How to prepare for work in 3D industry

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Old 11 November 2012   #16
Also may I suggest the idea of hoarding skills.
If you are given a chance to learn something outside your comfort zone, DO IT.



Your missing should be to LEARN as much as you can.

EDIT

And you would be surprised how a skill can help you.

For example

A bud of mine would travel all over Europe, spend a couple of months in one region and learn the local languages. He would use his skill with learning languages to offer translation services.
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Last edited by RobertoOrtiz : 11 November 2012 at 08:21 PM.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #17
We hired a matchmove artist once not realizing he was actually a talented animator. He was switching skillsets based on which market was stronger. Smart dude.
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Old 11 November 2012   #18
Originally Posted by leigh: Speaking as a highly experienced artist who has been out of work for four months now, I'd have to disagree with you on the second part of your statement there. Yes, people must definitely follow their dreams, but they also need to be aware that this industry isn't the most stable and inevitably there will be times when work is scarce. Thankfully I've always prepared for gaps financially, but it still kinda sucks to not have a job to go to everyday. My point being that a backup plan should consist of hoarding money when times are good so you'll be able to survive when times are lean. There isn't always work out there, so always be prepared.


Fair enough. To be honest, i work in the TV industry so i cant speak for the big film VFX houses, but i have not had more than 3 weeks of no work for the last 8 years. I stand by if you work hard and get good, look after your clients (very important!) and are not afraid to do the occasional boring corporate work, you can stay busy.

But of course Leigh is right about the saving part..it definately makes sense and its a trap i fell into when i started freelancing. Suddenly you have lots of money in your account and you go nuts and spend...bad idea.

And as others have said...its a good idea to spread your knowledge onto lots of things. Maybe i have been busy because i am an experienced 3d animator, 2d compositor and know Realflow very well...it definitely helps to know lots. (Sorry if that came across as braggy, i didnt mean it that way)
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Last edited by thethule : 11 November 2012 at 01:14 AM.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #19
Originally Posted by leigh: Speaking as a highly experienced artist who has been out of work for four months now, I'd have to disagree with you on the second part of your statement there. Yes, people must definitely follow their dreams, but they also need to be aware that this industry isn't the most stable and inevitably there will be times when work is scarce. Thankfully I've always prepared for gaps financially, but it still kinda sucks to not have a job to go to everyday. My point being that a backup plan should consist of hoarding money when times are good so you'll be able to survive when times are lean. There isn't always work out there, so always be prepared.


I know you will always get cool work but I am sorry to hear you haven't been working for four months. You are the last person I would think that would happen to
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Old 11 November 2012   #20
Leigh, would you say you have been out of work because from what i know of you, you only do texture work for films, therefore are tied into the film industries ups and downs? If you diversified more and did TV and freelance work in other areas, do you think you would have found work?
I know i'm taking a LOT of guesses about you right there, please feel free to put me in my place. I dont mean to offend (if in fact i did)
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Old 11 November 2012   #21
Originally Posted by thethule: Leigh, would you say you have been out of work because from what i know of you, you only do texture work for films, therefore are tied into the film industries ups and downs? If you diversified more and did TV and freelance work in other areas, do you think you would have found work?
I know i'm taking a LOT of guesses about you right there, please feel free to put me in my place. I dont mean to offend (if in fact i did)


Not offended at all, you're absolutely right. Funnily enough, my first four or five years in the industry was actually spent working as a generalist in TV commercials and other TV work, but for the past eight years I've done almost entirely texture painting only (and some lookdev and lighting when I lived in America, but that was more than six years ago). The point being that I've kinda mostly forgotten how to do everything else besides painting textures. Specialising like this has definitely closed some doors; this has never been an issue before since the big London studios I've always worked for hire lots of texture painters, but now that work is thin on the ground, loads of us have ended up out of work. It's important to note that this is the longest I've ever been between jobs - I've never had a problem finding work in the past, so specialising is not necessarily a bad thing. It's only bad when there's a situation like Soho is currently going through.

Thankfully over the years I've always kept other things on the side, like writing magazine articles and teaching texturing, both of which I'm currently involved in to keep money coming in. I also do photography professionally. But my first choice will always be painting textures in a studio so I'm hoping things will improve in Soho soon.
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Old 11 November 2012   #22
Thanks for your answers. Very interesting.
And how did become a animator or texture painter... ? Im just before any study or tuition, so what should i do to prepare. What should i do to get a tuition? Or should I do internships and then start to work?
 
Old 11 November 2012   #23
For now you can always dig through the internet for resources, many free or fairly affordable. Much of my initial exposure to CG and animation came from hours of just surfing and exploring free tutorials and projects online, same goes for schools I easily spent a handful of months just digging through courses and options to be certain which one I wanted for my goals and financial standing. If your convinced you want formal schooling dig for scholarships as well, even if you pick up a few small $500-$1000 ones it is a great ease off your wallet. I had a couple ones I did that took me maybe 10 minutes each which were about that amount.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #24
OK, thats what Im doing all the time.
Thanks guys
 
Old 11 November 2012   #25
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