Traditional Animation, Dead,Dying or Just Napping? (Editorial from 2003)

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Old 10 October 2012   #31
Originally Posted by DePaint: There will always be room, and demand, for 2D animation, I think.

Also, there are NPR rendering tools that make 3D look like 2D.


With the possible exception of the system used in Paperman, cel shading is a pretty poor approximation of actual 2d, at least for organic characters. It can be a great supplement to 2D animation (see, Iron Giant) but it's not very satisfying as a replacement.
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Old 10 October 2012   #32
Originally Posted by Meloncov: With the possible exception of the system used in Paperman, cel shading is a pretty poor approximation of actual 2d, at least for organic characters. It can be a great supplement to 2D animation (see, Iron Giant) but it's not very satisfying as a replacement.


If more R&D were done on 3D NPR rendering, and on 3D squash & stretch type animation, we could some day see a result where 3D scenes look very, very close to 2D Cell Animation a la Disney; To the point, perhaps, where almost nobody can tell whether the scene was drawn and animated in 2D, or modeled and animated in 3D.

There has gotta be some coding genius/computer graphics researcher out there who can make this happen.
 
Old 10 October 2012   #33
To me 2D animation will always be a medium used, simply because of the visual style and quality it has that 3D has yet to grasp. Not saying that cel shading and other NPR rendering isn't getting the 2D quality aspect but more of with 2D, you can add line weights, powerful exaggerated lines of motion and etc. Plus in my opinion cel shading is very mathematical with the shades and I find it doesn't have the finest that a hand painted cel has.

In terms of if 2D animation is dead or not? I would say not, as there's still large amounts of anime coming from Japan and every 2-3 months a new 2D animation series is released, plus movies and OVAs every year. However in the west, I would say that the 2D animation industry has just shrank to a very small market. There is still Disney trying to revive the medium with Princess and the Frog but when will the next 2D animation come along? I also want to mention that there's still some 2D animation being produced in the US but the animation work is shipped to Japan or Korean, such as Ben 10, the DC animated movies and Young Justice. I have to agree with what some one has said already that 2D in the west has had it's time and 3D is the now.

I just want to state, I remember googling this topic in the past as I wanted to know this because I know of a course where they are teaching 2D animation just for the first year and a mixture of mediums such as 3D in the second, What I was trying to answer was whether having just 2D animation skills and very limited 3D skills would get them into the animation industry. In my opinion (UK perspective) I found that they would struggle alot since in the UK, 2D animation studios are near to non existence and 3D studios won't accept them since they don't have the level of skills unfortunately. This also meant that most of them would have to move onto to do non animation related work.

Last edited by Darkherow : 10 October 2012 at 06:17 PM.
 
Old 10 October 2012   #34
For a great example on how incredile the Disney CAPS system was
were is the intro of the 1999 Tarzan FILM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OK65xD31mbM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZA6nitNeYw

Too bad that 4 years later this research was dropped.


Originally Posted by DePaint: If more R&D were done on 3D NPR rendering, and on 3D squash & stretch type animation, we could some day see a result where 3D scenes look very, very close to 2D Cell Animation a la Disney; To the point, perhaps, where almost nobody can tell whether the scene was drawn and animated in 2D, or modeled and animated in 3D.

There has gotta be some coding genius/computer graphics researcher out there who can make this happen.


I think part of the problem is that I have yet to see a method that takes advantage of the strenghts of both Traditional animation and 3D animation.
It seems that the methods pushed to us tend to weight heavily on the 3D animation workflows.
(thus missing the point)

When Laika set out to re invent stop motion, they took the BEST of both traditional Stop motion and the best of CG.
They are using state of the art, 3d printing, character animation, image cleanup(to hide rigs and seams) to make something that frankly looks AMAZING.
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Last edited by RobertoOrtiz : 10 October 2012 at 06:19 PM.
 
Old 10 October 2012   #35
I think in many ways a 2D-style workflow is already possible in 3D animation, but since that means going in and really sculpting every frame whether with a really complex rig, or a screen space deformer etc, it's hugely labor-intensive.
Once you go down that road you can't just put some poses in there and then let the computer interpolate between them as the results won't make any sense visually. I see people trying it though, I think Horton Hears a Who was one of the first CG movies to really push the poses and shapes in that kind of way and I really loved the animation in that movie. I read that for Hotel Transylvania they did a lot of this too, with the director drawing over the frames of the animators showing them where to push the pose far beyond what a typical rig would do. I haven't seen it yet to see how that worked out but I'm interested to check it out (even though Sandler puts me off big time).

Traditionally CG has had a lot more in common with stop motion I think than 2D as it's essentially moving puppets around rather than thinking in terms of shapes as 2D animators would generally tend to. As rigs have gotten better though it moves closer to being able to think in shapes but it's still not going to be the same. In some of Keith Langos tutorial videos he discusses some of this kind of thing and it's very interesting.

Cheers,
Brian

Last edited by Horganovski : 10 October 2012 at 10:34 PM.
 
Old 10 October 2012   #36
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