Help required to learn graphic design

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View Poll Results: Is Maya a good starting program to learn
yes 8 42.11%
no 11 57.89%
Voters: 17. You may not vote on this poll

 
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  11 November 2017
Help required to learn graphic design

Hey guys,
so I want to learn how to do graphic design similar to the amazing models that are posted daily on this forum. However, I am not studying digital arts in school, I am studying computer science. I am interested in learning how to design with Maya. I got my free student license and I was wondering what manuals should I read in order to properly learn Maya. Also, I was thinking about buying a drawing tablet to use in Sketchbook. Any tips would be nice. Thank You
 
  11 November 2017
Graphic design has not much directly to do with CG modeling although your CG modeling/rendering skills can be a great addition to your graphic design work.
Software related to graphic design would be more something like: Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Acrobat, etc and optionally some web-design (adobe Dreamweaver)

But to answer your question; Just look up some maya beginner tutorials on youtube... I'm sure you'll find a source to your liking within the search results.
Great payed sources for tutorials/courses are thegnomonworkshop.com, Lynda.com and pluralsight.com.
There are plenty more, but those are the most famous ones.

And to answer your poll question:

Yes: It is a good program to learn because it's very versatile and widely used.
No: You might find it to have a very steep learning curve especially if you are not familiar with a lot of the computer design related terms and theories. So it might be a bit much/overwhelming to start with

Last edited by ACiD80 : 11 November 2017 at 09:56 PM.
 
  11 November 2017
Graphic design typically refers to 2D designs - 2D graphical designs for websites, newspapers, magazines, product logos, product packaging, advertising billboards and so on.

What you want to do is typically called 3D Graphics, 3D Modeling, CAD, 3D Animation, CGI or just plain CG (Computer Graphics).

Your advantage is that a) 3D/CG is heavily based on Computing Science and Computer Graphics programming concepts and b) there are tons of video tutorials for doing 3D CG on Youtube and elsewhere.

Look here for example:

https://www.youtube.com/results?sea...ginner+tutorial

I would only recommend learning Maya if you have tons of free time - many months or even years to get really deep into it.

If you don't have that sort of time and only a few hours here and there I would highly recommend getting a student version of Cinema4D instead.

It can do a lot of what Maya can do, but is much better and friendlier for 3D beginners, and also typically gets you to an end result much faster than Maya.

Maya is only advisable really if you are looking to work fulltime in an actual Game, Film VFX, Animation or Television production company.

Maya is designed for team-work rather than 1 individual user. In a typical setting, 10 different specialists will be using only 1 or 2 aspects of Maya.
 
  11 November 2017
Originally Posted by skeebertus: Graphic design typically refers to 2D designs - 2D graphical designs for websites, newspapers, magazines, product logos, product packaging, advertising billboards and so on.

What you want to do is typically called 3D Graphics, 3D Modeling, CAD, 3D Animation, CGI or just plain CG (Computer Graphics).

Your advantage is that a) 3D/CG is heavily based on Computing Science and Computer Graphics programming concepts and b) there are tons of video tutorials for doing 3D CG on Youtube and elsewhere.

Look here for example:

https://www.youtube.com/results?sea...ginner+tutorial

I would only recommend learning Maya if you have tons of free time - many months or even years to get really deep into it.

If you don't have that sort of time and only a few hours here and there I would highly recommend getting a student version of Cinema4D instead.

It can do a lot of what Maya can do, but is much better and friendlier for 3D beginners, and also typically gets you to an end result much faster than Maya.

Maya is only advisable really if you are looking to work fulltime in an actual Game, Film VFX, Animation or Television production company.

Maya is designed for team-work rather than 1 individual user. In a typical setting, 10 different specialists will be using only 1 or 2 aspects of Maya.

I wouldnt agree with this... It is true it used to be like that when 3D was used relatively exclusively for VFX and previz because of the then high costs attached to it.
But since computers got more powerfull and CG/3D Animation software got a lot more cheaper it is used more and more in graphic design as-well since the late 2000's.
I'm not sure but I would be surprised if they don't give 3D classes in Graphic Design courses/schools these days.


It is hard to define the difference between CG and Graphic design.

CG literally means Computer Generated and is more related to the process of rendering/computing/generating imagery and video which in turn can be used in many different ways (including graphic design)

Graphic Design used to be just print related and thus it was much easier to define it in those days but these days since computers became awesomely media capable everything became digital it has more to do with the layout/balace of putting different elements (tekst, illustration, video...) including CG ones togeter into a final product/design like a web page or a poster/folder, etc.

Last edited by ACiD80 : 11 November 2017 at 09:55 PM.
 
  11 November 2017
Type "graphic design course" into Google image search and you'll see that the term is still highly associated with Photoshop, Ilustrator and so forth - mostly bitmap and vector graphics.

Yes, 3D is heavily used in Graphic Design these days.

But I don't think that googling for "how do I get into graphic design" leads you to anything hugely useful for learning 3D/CG.

Better terms are 3D modeling, CG animation, 3D Graphics, DCC (Digital Content Creation), CGI and so forth.
 
  11 November 2017
Originally Posted by skeebertus: Type "graphic design course" into Google image search and you'll see that the term is still highly associated with Photoshop, Ilustrator and so forth - mostly bitmap and vector graphics.

Yes, 3D is heavily used in Graphic Design these days.

But I don't think that googling for "how do I get into graphic design" leads you to anything hugely useful for learning 3D/CG.

Better terms are 3D modeling, CG animation, 3D Graphics, DCC (Digital Content Creation), CGI and so forth.

Sure, totally agree...
That's also what I essentially tried to explain in my first reply (i admit i sometimes cant find the right ways to explain things in english and it can get confusing) but just wanted to respond to your post where you categorise them as 2D vs 3D... which isnt exactly true.
The 2 shouldn't be seen as separated subjects but rather as complementary ones.
I've been in Graphic design since the 90's and there has been a lot of change because of technology. Saying graphic design is just 2D stuff isn't correct anymore.
 
  11 November 2017
Dude no!
As a graphic designer you start with tools such as: Photoshop,Illustrator,CorelDraw,InDesign!
 
  03 March 2018
Today people learn Zbrush as well as a main design course.
 
  03 March 2018
Your bread and butter isgoing to be with Ps Ai and Id and you'll have a very hard time getting a job without at least intermediate proficiency in those three. Being able to use Maya is a useful kicker because 3D is becoming much more widely used in graphic design, likewise designers are having to diversify more with skills in animation, illustration and interactivity now also. On top of that the market for designers is oversaturated and you'll need a BFA in design these days to get anywhere.

If you're interestedin "graphics" I'd stick with comp-sci and maybe see what your options are after studying. If you graduate knowing python/C++ etc you may want to check out software like Houdini or Grasshopper for Rhino where your expertise will give you best leverage. From there you could go towards VFX, procedural industrial design, motion graphics, etc. etc.
 
  03 March 2018
Quote: I want to learn how to do graphic design similar to the amazing models that are posted daily on this forum.

Ignoring the semantics of 3D vs Graphic Design - it looks like you want to use Maya to make rendered images. Maya, while complex, can be learned faster than some people think. As long as you figure out what aspects you need and focus only on those. For illustration, you would need to know modeling, texturing, lighting and rendering. Possibly some very minor rigging as well (for posing your characters).

Youtube is definitely your friend here! As someone else mentioned, there are also plenty of paid routes as well. Gnomon tends to be at a more advanced level so you may not be ready for that yet. Lynda is usually taught from the perspective of someone who's never seen a computer before so they can be a good place to start BUT - Lynda is primarily aimed at graphic designers. If you are looking to get a job doing this kind of work professionally, I would skip Lynda. They are fine if you just want to learn Maya for personal use, but they do not update their courses very often and frequently have out dated or obsolete techniques in their library. Plural Sight is probably the better place to start. Their stuff is a little more current than Lynda and moves faster, but isn't as advanced as Gnomon.

I would also second the Cinema 4D recommendation. If you just want to do this for fun, and are not looking for a career in games/vfx, C4D may be a better way to go. We use several packages where I work and I can almost always get someone up and running in C4D in a morning. Not so with Maya.
 
  03 March 2018
I worked for 20 years as Graphic Designer
for various companies in the washington DC metro area.
That meant having to b fluent in Quark Xpress(in the old days)
and most certainly fluent in Photoshop. Illustrator and
eventually Indesign.



That background has helped me tremendously in 3D/CG
particlularly in VXF Apps like After Effects CS
where I sometimes have to build Custom animated HUDS
etc. for certain Sci fi shots.
 
  03 March 2018
As a professional Graphic Designer in DC I usually DRILL into students the need to learn FUNDAMENTALS.
And a little bit of art history. It can only HELP you in you professional development long term/When we here in my team we focus on getting people with a STRONG traditional art background. The Tools come later.
Anyway

Here is year worth or Art school in Videos.
Gelstat theory
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yadmpXUQ68A
Rules of Third
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMjvvltQpmw
Golden Mean
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wcq5x8rSMXo
Color theory
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1CK9bE3H_s
Shape Theory
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KwmcJYtdLp0

There is more but this is a good start

And this is a GREAT Video to learn about trends
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcc1VyGvaYk
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Last edited by RobertoOrtiz : 03 March 2018 at 07:13 PM.
 
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