Postmortem: Threshold Entertainment (Food Fight- The Movie): What really happened...

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Old 03 March 2013   #31
omg... what is that?
is there a single expert that can explain how that much money can go into something like this and keep coming even after single first shot is made?
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Old 03 March 2013   #32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrewty07
Is there no system to check and deter things like this from happening? I have no experience with anything to that scale, I just figure with such hefty investment in time, money and talent that they would want "safety nets" in place to get the investments worth.



Yes there is. The position is called a "Line producer"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_producer

A line producer is the key manager during the daily operations of a motion picture production. The title is associated with the idea that he or she is the person who is "on the line" on a day-to-day basis.[1]
The line producer supports the director's vision but does not usually have direct influence on the creative expression or narrative of the film.[citation needed] Though it could be argued that through the Line Producer's ability to influence certain aspects of the film, like allocation of resources to certain departments, they can change important aspects of the film that have creative consequences, e.g Production Value.

From the beginning of principal photography, the line producer oversees the budgetary and physical production needs of the shoot. By the first day of production, several versions of the budget have usually been drafted. A finalized or "locked" budget is the one used as the basis for the production to move forward. A key objective of a line producer will be to respect this "locked" budget and to deliver in time.[citation needed]

While in production, the line producer oversees the execution of many decisions that must be made to deliver each day's shoot. The administrative aspects, especially those that have any financial impact, are all crucial areas of the line producer's work. These areas include but are not limited to negotiating compensation (usually during pre-production) of crew members (both for union and non-union productions), overseeing the locked budget, and resolving daily production issues (in conjunction with the first assistant director and possibly the unit production manager).[citation needed]
[edit]
 
Old 03 March 2013   #33
Interesting, thanks for the insight, I looked on IMDB and didn't see specifically a line producer just:

Produced by

Robert D. Cain .... executive producer Gregory Cascante .... co-executive producer Amber Dodson .... associate producer Robert Engelman .... producer Jenny Hope .... associate producer George Johnsen .... producer Lawrence Kasanoff .... producer Tom Ortenberg .... executive producer Alison Savitch .... producer Danny Suh .... co-executive producer Joshua Wexler .... producer
 
Old 03 March 2013   #34
Quote:
Originally Posted by balistic
Up somebody's nose, probably.


After watching the trailer for the first time today, I think you are right.
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Old 03 March 2013   #35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrewty07
Interesting, thanks for the insight, I looked on IMDB and didn't see specifically a line producer just:

Produced by

Robert D. Cain .... executive producer Gregory Cascante .... co-executive producer Amber Dodson .... associate producer Robert Engelman .... producer Jenny Hope .... associate producer George Johnsen .... producer Lawrence Kasanoff .... producer Tom Ortenberg .... executive producer Alison Savitch .... producer Danny Suh .... co-executive producer Joshua Wexler .... producer


I wonder how many of them still work in the VFX field?
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Old 03 March 2013   #36
I hope you guys are linking these postmortem threads.

I plan to cover more films in the near future, so if you have any ideas for films please do post them.
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Old 03 March 2013   #37
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertoOrtiz
I hope you guys are linking these postmortem threads.

I plan to cover more films in the near future, so if you have any ideas for films please do post them.


I always love these sorts of stories.
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Old 03 March 2013   #38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrewty07
Interesting, thanks for the insight, I looked on IMDB and didn't see specifically a line producer just:


IMDB may not have a slot for Line producers. Much like they don't have any listings for TV commercials or game credits.
 
Old 03 March 2013   #39
One other thing to keep in mind is most smaller films usually have a "Bond Completion Guarantee"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Completion_guarantee

In a nutshell it's like a form of insurance that the film will get finished on time and under budget. If the bond company has to step in they have the right to pretty much do whatever ever they have to in order to get the film finished. Including firing directors, actors, reshooting etc.

A little known detail about "Blade Runner" fact is that Riddley Scott was fired from the film for going 10% over budget.

"Only days away from the beginning of principal photography, production company Filmways Inc., who had promised to provide $15 million for the production, withdrew from the project, investing the money in Brian De Palma's Blow Out instead. In only a matter of days, producer Michael Deeley was able to broker a $22 million three-way deal with Tandem Pictures, the Ladd Company (through Warner Bros.) and Hong Kong producer Sir Run Run Shaw (20th Century Fox, United Artists and Universal all turned the project down). The Ladd Company provided $7½ million and took domestic distribution rights. Sir Run Run Shaw also provided $7½ million and took international distribution rights. Tandem Pictures provided $7 million and took ancillary distribution rights (TV, home video etc). Tandem also provided the completion guarantee on the proviso that if the film went over its $22 million budget by 10% or more, they would pay for it but they could assume complete artistic control of the project. Ultimately, the film cost $28 million, and executive producers Jerry Perenchio and Bud Yorkin did indeed take over the project."

"Ridley Scott and Michael Deeley were briefly fired from the production shortly after principal photography wrapped. Because the film had gone over budget, executive producers Jerry Perenchio and Bud Yorkin of Tandem Productions had stepped in, firing Scott and Deeley and taking over the editing of the project themselves. And although they did rehire Scott and Deeley (mainly due to the intervention of Alan Ladd Jr.), they retained artistic control. After two disastrous preview screenings of the workprint, which the audience claimed was difficult to understand, Yorkin and Perenchio decided to record an explanatory voiceover and add a happy ending. Ridley Scott was not averse to the idea of a voiceover (as is often claimed), but he had wanted a voiceover with Deckard musing philosophically on the implications of his actions. Yorkin and Perenchio however wanted a voiceover where Deckard literally explains aspects of the film to the audience."


In reading about Bond Completions I ran across the story of the animated film
"The Thief and the Cobbler"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thief_and_the_Cobbler

It's way to long to post here but it took a Grand total of 31 years to complete!
 
Old 03 March 2013   #40
Michael32766 has just (possibly) explained in a nutshell how this project got finished, using only Wikipedia references and without any hazardous testimonials.

Last edited by Pookyjuice : 03 March 2013 at 10:19 PM.
 
Old 08 August 2013   #41
NYTIMES: The Rise and Fall of the Computer-Animated ‘Foodfight!’

Quote from cartoonbrew:
The CGI trainwreck Foodfight!, which has been a perennial favorite on Cartoon Brew, finally hits the bigtime with this New York Times article. If there’s one lesson to take away from the production of the film, it’s that people without animation experience shouldn’t be trusted to produce or direct animated features

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/11/m...&pagewanted=all&
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Old 08 August 2013   #42
And here I thought Delgo was the worst CG animated film...

That said, I must admit, its things like this that makes me want to get into animation. I suppose its the feeling that, "hey, I could probably do that..."
 
Old 08 August 2013   #43
OMG I wish I knew about this film before! After just watching the trailer I don't think I've ever laughed so hard at just a movie trailer. Is there any cult following of this movie at all? Maybe just the trailer is hilarious but now I'm really interested in watching the movie. It's not on Netflix but it's only 7 bucks on Amazon. I'll have to consider getting it.
 
Old 08 August 2013   #44
Ummm....


Quote:
Originally Posted by New York Times Article
It is not unusual in the animation industry for workers to amuse themselves by sexualizing their characters. “I thought: ‘They’re just having fun writing this. It won’t make it into the finished film,’ ”


Say what again?
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Old 08 August 2013   #45
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