Sculpting and Animating

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Old 05 May 2017   #1
Sculpting and Animating

Hello guys, I've got a few questions about software and stuff. So my priority is to learn animation, but I don't want to do this while using some free 3D models. I want to know how things work from the very beginning. So 2 months ago I've been doing a lot of speed sculpts in Zbrush (my trial has ended and I don't have money to buy it tho), and I know that Sculptris and Mudbox are also sculpting softwares, so I'm planning of trying them out (downloaded both of them, so far I don't know which one is better?). I'm also trying to learn modeling in Maya, but it seems so much harder than sculpting (I mean, when it comes to characters/creatures, I've heard it's great for hard surfaces and enviro tho). And all these high/low poly talk (which I barely understand) made me wonder if it's actually smart to sculpt characters when I want to make animations with them. Cuz it means they gotta be low poly cuz my PC is gonna die with high poly stuff? Right? There's also something about topology/retopology which I don't understand at all. Buuut, is there any possibility (and is it a good idea) to sculpt characters in Mudbox/Sculptris and then import them to Maya and then somehow prepare it for animation or is it better to just model characters in Maya from the very beginning? If so, are there any tutorials you can really recommend? Because yes, I know there's tone of them on youtube, but maybe you know some of "the best" for a person like me, a newbie?
Thanks so much for you answers and help, I hope you can understand everything, since English is not my first language. I DID MY BEST.
 
Old 05 May 2017   #2
If your priority is really animation than distracting yourself with
-sculpting
-topoloy cleanup (from sculpts)
-rigging
-texturing shading
May be more trouble than it is worth as you will spend months on all of that!

If Animating is your goal maybe this is a better approach.
http://www.animationmentor.com/anim...ion-characters/
If your animation is truly good than the fact that you used a ready-to-go anim rig/character doesn't matter much.
 
Old 05 May 2017   #3
...I'll also add the tutorial library Digital Tutors into the mix as well too round things out in terms of quality instructional material which are generally authored by industry professionals.
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Old 05 May 2017   #4
Hey, thank you for answering! I was thinking about going straight into animation, but some time ago I've been looking through stuff like "what should an animator portfolio have" and some people said it's a bad thing to see free character rigs in your reel (and that they see them in 10000 reels and that's what makes them less interesting I guess?), some said it's better to team up with character artist and get them to do everything "animation-preparing-related", and only few people said there's nothing wrong with going with free rigs. So it's all a little confusing :(
 
Old 05 May 2017   #5
Like I said if your animation is *good* its doesn't matter as long as the character/rig portrays your 'chops'.
What you don't want is something the looks horrible and is animated as-good-as-you-could-make-because you are held back by all the stuff you can't do well (modeling, rigging, etc). Rigging especially can hold you back. If you aren't good and technical your animation might suffer drastically cause your rig is bad and inarticulate!

If you can find great collaborator great. But if not you might spend years making your first character to a point you can animate it. Do you really want to take that time away from animating? Thats a long road ahead.
 
Old 05 May 2017   #6
Originally Posted by dgandgd: Hey, thank you for answering! I was thinking about going straight into animation, but some time ago I've been looking through stuff like "what should an animator portfolio have" and some people said it's a bad thing to see free character rigs in your reel (and that they see them in 10000 reels and that's what makes them less interesting I guess?), some said it's better to team up with character artist and get them to do everything "animation-preparing-related", and only few people said there's nothing wrong with going with free rigs. So it's all a little confusing :(


you won't get docked for having rigs that people have seen before if the animation is very good. you can also customize most rigs a decent amount so that they don't just look like they came out of the box - so I do suggest you know some very basic rigging/modeling concepts. it also helps to place your animation in a good context, meaning the ability to make sets that serve the story (whether you create the models or download them). it's far preferable usually and makes the animation more specific than a character talking into the void or sitting on a chair in the middle of nowhere.

You could do something like w/ artella so you work on a short film as well.
 
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