High school 3d programs?

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  11 November 2012
High school 3d programs?

Hi guys,

I was wondering if anyone knew of any 3d training programs for high school? It doesn't necessarily matter of the actual software, but I'm doing research for a paper, and haven't been able to find much. I was looking on the Autodesk education portal, but it seems like the only non-college program focused on the industrial design. I'm looking more for hm..general 3d/animation maybe aiming towards games or tv/film.

Thanks!
 
  11 November 2012
There's not going to be anything specifically targeted at high school
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The Z-Axis
 
  11 November 2012
Do you mean programs aimed at high school aged kids, or programs actually within high schools? The former is pretty common; most every art school has a summer program for high school students, and many include CG classes. The latter does, I believe, exist, but it's gonna be a lot harder to find.
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KevinBaker.Artstation.com
 
  11 November 2012
I took three years of a multimedia class that taught 3DS Max in high school.

If your looking for something that will start you from scratch, you could pick up a book like this.

http://www.amazon.com/Autodesk-3ds-...eywords=3ds+max

You can get a student license of all the Autodesk 3D programs for 250 bucks.

http://www.amazon.com/Entertainment...eywords=3ds+max

-AJ
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  11 November 2012
Originally Posted by AJ1: You can get a student license of all the Autodesk 3D programs for 250 bucks.

http://www.amazon.com/Entertainment...eywords=3ds+max

-AJ


Or you could get one for free from students.autodesk.com.
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KevinBaker.Artstation.com
 
  11 November 2012
blender is a free modeling and animation software, and Source Filmmaker is a free animation suite you can animate 3D models you can import into.
 
  11 November 2012
I developed a four year 3D animation course (that included elements of game design and motion capture) that I taught to high school students for nearly ten years.
The software I taught included 3ds Max, ZBrush, Mudbox, Unreal Development Kit (UDK), Photoshop, Sketchbook Pro, Premiere, After Effects, and Motion Builder.
I'd be happy to answer any questions you might have.
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Last edited by Locutus : 11 November 2012 at 06:04 PM.
 
  11 November 2012
You're not going to find anything specific for highschool, the majority of students who start learning 3D software at that age do it as a hobby rather than through a formal class. What is your research about? Maybe a quick synopsis could help us narrow down our suggestions.
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  11 November 2012
My local towns HS has a animation/multimedia building, part of a large grant for the public school + donations from past artists ( & myself), they use cinema, but are jumping to blender, since its free for students, and they can learn the basics. Its a pretty impressive building, stage, labs, green screen. Wish we had all that to play with! Sad though, the fine arts dept. did not get any of this grant money (the large chunk)

Its like a school within a school running during normal hours, the program, that students have to apply to get into is called SLAM. Its like trying to get in AP art in high school, or a special program that has a few pre req's. Its a fairly new facility, and they are still getting everything setup/along with faculty.

http://slamforum.ning.com/video/cinema-4d-expresso

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Last edited by ambassador : 11 November 2012 at 06:04 PM.
 
  11 November 2012
Originally Posted by grantmoore3d: You're not going to find anything specific for highschool, the majority of students who start learning 3D software at that age do it as a hobby rather than through a formal class.


Actually that's not true. Autodesk has the Autodesk Animation Academy that is specifically design for high school learning environments.
It includes software: 3ds Max, Maya, Mudbox, Sketchbook Pro, and Motionbuilder and an extremely detailed and substantial curriculum.

http://students.autodesk.com/ama/or...Start-Here.html
http://students.autodesk.com/ama/or...nding-page.html
http://imaginit.com/software-soluti...imation-academy

The curriculum aligns with the STEM initiative that was developed to expand student knowledge of Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathmatics and, in addition, it goes into modeling/animation production for film and game design.
The curriculum also has detailed lesson plans for the instructor to use.

I incorporated some of this curriculum into my own curriculum for the 4 year course that I taught. However, it can be used as a stand alone curriculum.

One last thing, by signing up at the Autodesk Education Community students can access much of what is available in the Autodesk Animation Academy curriculum.
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Last edited by Locutus : 11 November 2012 at 06:27 PM.
 
  11 November 2012
Originally Posted by Locutus: I developed a four year 3D animation course (that included elements of game design and motion capture) that I taught to high school students for nearly ten years.
The software I taught included 3ds Max, ZBrush, Mudbox, Unreal Development Kit (UDK), Photoshop, Sketchbook Pro, Premiere, After Effects, and Motion Builder.
I'd be happy to answer any questions you might have.


I'm hoping to work out a connection with our studio and the local high school and middle school in our area with their engineering and arts program. I will have to touch base with you at some point for some tips. I'm hoping to create a learning environment that we can also identify and develope talent for future growth and depth.

**Thanks for the last post. Great information. I'll definitely be looking into what Autodesk is providing/promoting.
 
  11 November 2012
Hi guys,

Thanks for all the responses! To be specific, I was looking at researching programs either aimed high school kids, or to see if some schools already had a formal program (as in not summer school). There are some folks in Massachusetts that had asked me about this sort of thing. Nobody seemed to find any formal programs, but the idTech summer camps seemed like they were pretty popular throughout the country. But there has been a discussion of proposing a possible six week program (to start) or try and develop a full, formal program aimed at high school students. I am trying to see if there were any, and maybe see what worked, what didn't, etc.

The paper can hopefully help them outline how to structure any such program, maybe even a case study of sorts, or post mortem. So far I've only seen the idTech camps, and was thinking maybe it is too cost prohibitive.

Thanks for the links Locutus, I didn't see those on the Autodesk site! I'm sure I will follow up with you later. And thank you Ambassador, I didn't see that program, but looks pretty great!
 
  11 November 2012
I can't speak for everywhere, but I have a local example for you.

Locally in Vancouver BC, we have an extracurricular school of arts aimed at kids and teens called Arts Umbrella. They have been around for quite a while providing all sorts of arts related classes, including traditional animation. But not until recently did they have a new free scholarship program with a game industry focus (paid for by scholarship awarded to a limited number of teens selected by portfolio selection). This is jointly provided by EA. More info here:

http://www.artsumbrella.com/programs/scholarships

Disclaimer: I do not work for Arts Umbrella or EA and I do not endorse either of them. Just providing an example here. I do think it is fantastic to have outreach programs like these though, I wish I knew more about the possibilities of this industry in high school.


I believe there are many high schools around US and Canada focusing in the arts... but usually they focus on the core traditional art and performing arts instead of a specialized commercial field.
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  11 November 2012
Originally Posted by XLNT-3d: I'm hoping to work out a connection with our studio and the local high school and middle school in our area with their engineering and arts program. I will have to touch base with you at some point for some tips. I'm hoping to create a learning environment that we can also identify and develope talent for future growth and depth.

**Thanks for the last post. Great information. I'll definitely be looking into what Autodesk is providing/promoting.


Man, that's exciting. Just let me know how I can help.

Originally Posted by alexgk: Hi guys,

Thanks for all the responses! To be specific, I was looking at researching programs either aimed high school kids, or to see if some schools already had a formal program (as in not summer school). There are some folks in Massachusetts that had asked me about this sort of thing. Nobody seemed to find any formal programs, but the idTech summer camps seemed like they were pretty popular throughout the country. But there has been a discussion of proposing a possible six week program (to start) or try and develop a full, formal program aimed at high school students. I am trying to see if there were any, and maybe see what worked, what didn't, etc.

The paper can hopefully help them outline how to structure any such program, maybe even a case study of sorts, or post mortem. So far I've only seen the idTech camps, and was thinking maybe it is too cost prohibitive.

Thanks for the links Locutus, I didn't see those on the Autodesk site! I'm sure I will follow up with you later. And thank you Ambassador, I didn't see that program, but looks pretty great!

Well, there are a few school districts here in Texas that have fully developed high school curriculum in 3d animation and related industries. The district I worked for had the longest and most fully developed course. My classes produced students who are now working for BioWare, Timegate Studios, and Gearbox (after attending great colleges as well). Though I don't teach full time any more, I still have contact info for the people in charge of those programs in those districts.
Summer camp courses like idTech and Digital Media Academy are ok too, but they are only 1-3 week courses that are generally pretty fast paced. Of the two I would HIGHLY recommend Digital Media Academy, as I worked for them for 6 years. Their courses are taught by experienced industry pros rather than camp counselors .
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  11 November 2012
Wow, that is a nice list of studios the students are working in. Boston has some studios like Harmonix and Irrational, so that can certainly be a selling point of any program so to speak. I mean that only in getting funding for it, not "selling" it to students. I would imagine a shorter term program would be a bit hectic, but I think if it even excites them for when they get to college, that would be better than nothing. I'll look into Digital Media Academy as well, thanks again for the info!
 
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