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Old 12-27-2012, 08:10 PM   #1
Haider of Sweden
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Achieve same white balance in PS as in Vray?

I realize the question might be very wrong in some way, but I am quite new to white balance and such.

The question is simply like, in Vray I can set a custom color to setup white balance while in Photoshop, you work in RGB (values -100 to 100) and different tones.

What I wanted to try out is to achieve the same look in PS as the one from Vray. And since I know the RGB color used in Max, I was hoping there was a way in Photoshop to do white balance based on that color.
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Old 12-28-2012, 02:26 PM   #2
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In Photoshop you can only set the whit balance for RAW image files. For jpegs and other non-RAW image files, you can instead set the White Point in the Curves editor. Hit Ctrl+M to open Curves, then click the little white point icon. Now click anywhere in the image to set a white point. You can make as many attempts as you like until it looks right to you. You can also set the black point if you need it.

Photoshop also has a Variations section. Image Adjustments > Variations might get you close enough, then you can fine tune it.
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Old 12-28-2012, 03:17 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillster
... set the White Point in the Curves editor. Hit Ctrl+M to open Curves, then click the little white point icon.


Thanks Dylan,

That would mean I might need to render a non-balanced image from Vray, and then afterwards pick the exact color I used for white-balance in Vray.
Will have to try it out, to see if I can mimic the exact result in PS as in Vray using that method.

I tested on an already balanced image. No wonder I couldn't achieve the result I was hoping for...
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Old 12-29-2012, 08:38 PM   #4
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You are better off in Photoshop if you render out linear material in 32bit floating point colours. Then you'll get the same working conditions in Photoshop as you get in 3dsmax before it is colour corrected so to speak.
 
Old 12-29-2012, 09:03 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Swahn
You are better off in Photoshop if you render out linear material in 32bit floating point colours. Then you'll get the same working conditions in Photoshop as you get in 3dsmax before it is colour corrected so to speak.


Could you please explain a little more?
Can you explain "... if you render out linear material in 32 bit...". And how should I set the white balance in the Vray Camera. White?
Should I use EXR as file format or another?
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Old 12-29-2012, 11:03 PM   #6
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Well, this is all about what people call the "linear workflow" thingy. But you don't have to think about render out different "passes" for compositing in compositing tools such as After Effects, Nuke or whatever.

I'm not sure if you are familiar with concepts such as "gamma curves"? To put it short, it's about the luminance response curve within low dynamic range images.


In the real world light is neither limited, and naturally not gamma corrected either. But if you view linear material on a monitor it will appear too dark for the human eye. That is why it is gamma corrected with a value of 2,2.

But the light in 3dsmax and Vray is always linear before being shown in the framebuffer. It becomes even more obvious with the Vray framebuffer, because you need to toggle the sRGB-button to make it appear right on a normal monitor.

If you want to get the same "working conditions" in Photoshop as in Vray you need to do the following:
  • Turn off all clamping and sub-pixel mapping.
  • Turn off all exposure settings, or just set the white balance to "neutral" if you don't care about adjusting the initial exposure in Photoshop.
  • Save out the image as linear floating point, either TIF, openEXR or other suitable format.

Unfortunately there are no proper default tools in Photoshop that will allow you to handle floating point material like in Vray. Photoshop isn't designed to "act" as a virtual camera the way Vray or other photo realistic 3d-renderers do. It is merely an adjustment tool for (mostly low dynamic) photos, and the RAW importer tool is not really designed for computer generated floating point material. At least I have never found out such a workflow.

If you look for more advanced compositors such as Nuke and Fusion there are good tools that mimic proper physical camera settings. I even think Autodesk's Composite (Toxik) have good fairly tools for that, at least when it comes to white balance and exposure value.

But I'm afraid Photoshop alone lacks the tools you seek which would give you the same type of workflows in both.
 
Old 12-29-2012, 11:03 PM   #7
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