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Old 02-26-2013, 11:07 PM   #1
poopydoopy
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Crystal (Criss) Maitland
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How to draw from the inside out?

Hello, I'm having a serious issue that worries me, very badly.
But I'm having an issue drawing from the "inside out" I think you're supposed to do...

I've seen on a thread here that when drawing the human figure, you're not supposed to worry too much about the lines but rather the tones in between the lines. But even so, I lack originality in poses, and trying to remember all that I've learned only screws up my memory of the body in shape itself.
When I draw, I try to think of the muscle and bones beneath mainly, but because I do not remember so much, I tend to blow things out of proportion and my lines look horrible.

If I cannot draw from the inside out relying on the bone and muscle beneath, how can I actually draw my lines right from simply thinking of the tones?

I hope you guys understand what I mean and know what I should practice or study more to fix this issue.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 07:50 AM   #2
Lunatique
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Anatomy and figure takes a long time to learn. Artists spend years and years trying to master it, and they continue to spend a lot of time mastering it even after they've already become professionals. Even the most famous and respected artists are still continuing to learn and practice so they can get better at it. There is no shortcut--you just have to pay your dues.

I have a post that contains some tips on how to get the most natural looking poses in your artwork: http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthr...955#post7242955
 
Old 03-29-2013, 08:30 AM   #3
BillyWJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poopydoopy
Hello, I'm having a serious issue that worries me, very badly.
But I'm having an issue drawing from the "inside out" I think you're supposed to do...

I've seen on a thread here that when drawing the human figure, you're not supposed to worry too much about the lines but rather the tones in between the lines. But even so, I lack originality in poses, and trying to remember all that I've learned only screws up my memory of the body in shape itself.
When I draw, I try to think of the muscle and bones beneath mainly, but because I do not remember so much, I tend to blow things out of proportion and my lines look horrible.

If I cannot draw from the inside out relying on the bone and muscle beneath, how can I actually draw my lines right from simply thinking of the tones?

I hope you guys understand what I mean and know what I should practice or study more to fix this issue.


A good book on anatomy is a great place to start:

http://www.amazon.com/Classic-Human...omy+for+artists

This book is a good one, I got it in college, and still use it as reference. The process of learning the body starts usually with a figure drawing class, where you learn the ways that the body changes as it moves - the parts of the body move in specific ways, and muscles and tissue move along with the limbs - for example, if you have the forearm raised, the biceps will bulge, with more bulge if the figure is carrying weight.

Then, you move onto learning what the muscles are, where they are, and how they move and change. You don't need to learn the names, but it can help.

The next step is to experiment with different body types - fat, skinny, young, old - a good figure drawing class will have you draw from a wide range of body types, of both sexes. The more knowledge of the basic framework of the body can help you figure out what's going on, and make choices in how you render it.

Then, you keep doing it, over and over and over.

I was lucky that as part of my degree in illustration, my college offered a class specifically about anatomy for artists, and I learned a great deal from it. Some of the early material was to translate the joints of the body into a mechanical form - for instance, the elbow is a hinge, whereas the wrist is more of a ball and socket, just like the the shoulder and hip. We were shown how to use rubber bands as muscles, and metal rods as bones (drawing them), and we would work with a live model and translate the pose into rods and rubber bands. Very interesting thing to work with. We also learned things like how the body changes over time, for instance, as people grow older, their ears and noses and lips keep growing, and get almost comical when elderly. So, to draw a child, you want small noses, lips, and ears.

We also got to work with cadavers, which was interesting - the old masters like Michelangelo learned anatomy by dissecting cadavers, as using live models was banned by the church (as was working with cadavers).

The best way to learn all of this is to get some books, take some classes if you can, and STUDY. Use every opportunity you can to study the human body, and how it works. Being an artist to me means you have a healthy curiosity about everything anyway - I'll often look at my wrists or feet or shoulder and move them, and watch other people around me.
 
Old 03-30-2013, 05:56 PM   #4
Lunatique
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I forgot about this post (advice on how to approach anatomy and figure drawing):
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthr...?f=166&t=939978

It'll help you approach anatomy and figure in a way what won't frustrate and discourage you.
 
Old 03-30-2013, 05:56 PM   #5
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