BBC: Meet CG animator Paulo Machado, the man who has lived in hospital for 45 years

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  08 August 2013
BBC: Meet CG animator Paulo Machado, the man who has lived in hospital for 45 years

Quote:
"
...Because the pair have been living in the hospital for so long, they are allowed to decorate their room with their own possessions. Zagui's side is filled with dolls and books - and being a confirmed cinephile, Machado's is full of film memorabilia. He also has two powerful computers, as he has been able to train in hospital as a computer animator.


In May this year he reached his target - $65,000 (44,000) - in an online campaign to raise finance for a 3D animated film series called The Adventures of Leca and her Friends, based on a book that Zagui wrote which he will direct"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-23364127
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  08 August 2013
Is the bad animation forgiven/not mentioned just b/c of their sad physical state?
 
  08 August 2013
Originally Posted by malcolmvexxed: Is the bad animation forgiven/not mentioned just b/c of their sad physical state?

OUCH..Ouch oh man, OUCH.

-R
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  08 August 2013
Well, I'll admit this isn't the kind of show I'd like to see but:

Originally Posted by Rocky Balboa: All I wanna do is go the distance. If I can go that distance, you see, and that bell rings and I'm still standin', I'm gonna know that I wasn't just another bum from the neighborhood.


Even if the technique or theme isn't the best or the most exciting. The fact is you're sometimes dealt a poor hand and you still have to make the play.

At the very least the pair will have done something with their lives.
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  08 August 2013
Any particular reason for this to be in GD and not in News? It'd probably be a bit of a stretch in news as well...
Is the idea to have a discussion on how CG specifically can give severely constrained hospitalized people a bigger incentive to live than pretty much any outward facing creative activity? (only case in which this would be GD material).
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  08 August 2013
Originally Posted by ThE_JacO: Is the idea to have a discussion on how CG specifically can give severely constrained hospitalized people a bigger incentive to live than pretty much any outward facing creative activity? (only case in which this would be GD material).


What, exactly, is an "outward facing creative activity?"
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  08 August 2013
Originally Posted by RobertoOrtiz: OUCH..Ouch oh man, OUCH.

-R


Ouch what? This cult of personality/sob story thing on the internet has gotten completely out of hand. If someone makes terrible work but they're handicapped, how should it be viewed? Purely as a charity case, which is perfectly fine, but you've posted it on a CG discussion area and the CG isn't being discussed. Setting creators up to be free from criticism by telling a sympathetic backstory is disingenuous.
 
  08 August 2013
Originally Posted by Artbot: What, exactly, is an "outward facing creative activity?"

A creative activity intended to have an audience, potentially connecting the author to it as well, as opposed to one you'd only do for the sake of itself, or for your own edification.
Admittely way wankier than I ever might have intended it to be. My apologies for that.
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  08 August 2013
Geez, some of you guys are pretty heartless...

Yeah, maybe the guy technique is not the best, but how many of us would have the will power to do this in his situation? I'm happy for him.
 
  08 August 2013
I kinda feel bad about saying this, but I agree with malcolmvexxed. Kudos for trying and making the most of a bad situation. However, bad is still bad.

I love my nephew and cherish all of his drawings, but I hold him to a different standard than I would somebody like Stahlberg simply because the kid's only 5yo. Similarly, I think (as a society) we often have a different metric for success when it comes to certain challenged or disadvantaged groups.

There's nothing inherently wrong with that, as an apple can never be an orange. Still, let's at least acknowledge that there are two sets of rules and that things might play out mighty different if suddenly everybody were held to the same objective scrutiny.

It reminds me of why I don't watch "Dancing with the Stars". People heap praise on how well these D-listers tango or quickstep when, in fact, the professional partners are usually doing most of the work. For non-professionals with no training and little prep, they dance very well. Compared to anybody with actual training, experience, and talent, they all kinda suck though.

I don't see it as heartless, personally. The truth isn't always about happy puppy dogs and sparkly rainbows. Isn't that why we seek critique anyway? Honesty is way more important, imo, than pandering & stock compliments.

Again, I commend this guy for doing something with himself and reaching toward something greater. Do I personally think that his work is great? Well, there's the art in MOMA and then there's the awesome art my nephew makes that I stick on the fridge. I'm pretty sure that says it all.
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Last edited by cookepuss : 08 August 2013 at 07:23 AM.
 
  08 August 2013
Well, but the point of the article it was more about his willpower and the power of art to give the guy meaning. No one was calling him the next best thing.

And you have to think that not only he has these serious health problems, but he's also poor and lives in a developing country, my home country of Brazil (where we don't have a serious animation Industry, where the wages in the private sector are very low and computers cost three times more than in the US, thanks to stupid protectionist taxes). I'm not even sure if he knows English (which makes much harder to learn anything CGI related)

Those are all facts that get in his way but he was still able to learn his craft, even if not in a high level and to crowdfund a personal project. Kudos to him.

I don't know how you guys can read this story and instead of thinking "Ow, awesome how our art can give this guy meaning and direction!". Instead you think "Oh, lame art. I can do better."

Heartless.
 
  08 August 2013
Originally Posted by hikarubr: I don't know how you guys can read this story and instead of thinking "Ow, awesome how our art can give this guy meaning and direction!". Instead you think "Oh, lame art. I can do better."

Maybe because these human interest stories are a dime a dozen. I'm not trying to be cruel. I'm not trying to devalue what he's doing. I'm not trying to underestimate the power of the human will to survive, thrive, and create.

While categorizing this a "sob story", as malcolmvexxed put it, sounds harsh, it's hard to deny that this is exactly how the media treats them. Tug at the heart strings and get people to cry. There's certain inspiration to be found through these stories. I won't deny that. However, such stories aren't particularly unique or all that new.

It's unfortunate that we live in a culture that says that everybody's special and that everybody's a winner. To quote Roberto, "OUCH..Ouch oh man, OUCH." I know. We're not all special though. Not everybody is or can be a winner. I look at this guy, what he's overcome, & what he's accomplished and say, "He's found something that makes him happy. He's found a way to make the best of his situation. Good for him."

I'm just struggling to find out what makes his story more special than the next guy's. Without getting too personal, I can safely say that a number of us here on this board have overcome some pretty stiff odds to be where we are today. Whatever our origins and circumstances, here we are - still standing and, hopefully, thriving.

We've all got a story; some more dramatic than others, but still. The story is not that life knocked you down, but that you got up again. That's the human condition. We either sink or find ways to swim. Thankfully, most of us are swimmers.

Put to paper, some of us here would seem as interesting or inspirational, if not more so. This struggle over adversity is all too common. This guy's story is interesting, but no more or less special.

We're not all made the same. I understand this all too well. I have a 26 year old cousin. She was born physically disabled and is mentally no older than a 3 or 4 year old. I fully acknowledge that there's a different set of standards for her than there is for her other cousins. She's her own best metric. When she accomplishes something above and beyond her known limitations, I'm happy for her. It's a "good for her" situation.

Similarly, when I look at this guy, I too say, "Good for him." Even so, I have to acknowledge that he's being judged by a different set of rules. The moment somebody puts him up as a source of inspiration for everybody else, the rules change.

Like I said, I love my nephew's art. It's got a permanent place on the refrigerator. In that context, I'll always judge him against himself. However, the moment I decide to hang his piece next to everybody else's in a gallery, I know that he's going to be judged against them. The bar gets raised and how his blue mowhawked stick figure men stand against everything else changes.

You can't offer up a story like this for public consumption without opening it to public scrutiny.

Honestly, how many of you would chime in and offer him some friendly tips and advice if you met him? Again, that's how we grow and get better. I'm sure that he wants to be treated like everybody else. If that's the case, we should be happy to constructively critique him as we would everybody else. That's the sort of thing these sites are built around, not ego stroking.

Good for him, but still.... I believe that we should strive for some semblance of equality, regardless of race, economics, or physical challenge. We may not be all made the same, but we can certainly strive to be treated the same. Love it or hate it, that comes with as many downsides as upsides.

If that makes me heartless then I'm sorry.


(FWIW, though I won't apologize for having an opinion, I do apologize if it has offended. I'm not trying to rub people the wrong way.)
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Last edited by cookepuss : 08 August 2013 at 03:08 PM.
 
  08 August 2013
Originally Posted by malcolmvexxed: Is the bad animation forgiven/not mentioned just b/c of their sad physical state?

Am I missing something? I see the 3 panels which must come from this book they keep mentioning and then the section of storyboard at the bottom. Where is this bad animation?
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  08 August 2013
Originally Posted by malcolmvexxed: Ouch what? This cult of personality/sob story thing on the internet has gotten completely out of hand. If someone makes terrible work but they're handicapped, how should it be viewed? Purely as a charity case, which is perfectly fine, but you've posted it on a CG discussion area and the CG isn't being discussed. Setting creators up to be free from criticism by telling a sympathetic backstory is disingenuous.


What a spectacularly horrid post. Where do you even see his animation work to have an opinion on it?

This isn't a "sob story" as you so heartlessly put it, it's actually, on the contrary, a story about how a guy in an extraordinarily difficult position is using a creative outlet to deal with his life. It's a very positive story and frankly I think it's a story that's always worth telling, as creativity can be an incredible cartharsis. I don't think the quality of the result is even relevant here, the story is that someone is actually doing something constructive with his time instead of wasting away in a hospital bed. And at any rate, he has plenty of time to practice his craft and improve.

Do you also go around trashing five year old children's drawings?
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  08 August 2013
Originally Posted by leigh: I don't think the quality of the result is even relevant here, the story is that someone is actually doing something constructive with his time instead of wasting away in a hospital bed.
I couldn't agree more.

I've now seen more CG artwork from this hospital bound guy than some users who have been posting on this forum for 11 years.
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