CGTalk > Main > News
Login register
Thread Closed share thread « Previous Thread | Next Thread »
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-28-2012, 10:14 PM   #1
johweedee
Frequenter
 
johweedee's Avatar
portfolio
Joe Daniels
Animator/Animation Instructor
Ex'pression College
Alameda, US
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 115
Near Real-time Rendering


Check out this post on techniques for rendering at near real-time:
http://starfishninja.blogspot.com/2...iewport-20.html

While the article focuses on a uniquely developed Maya technique, the application can be broad. The main point of interest is using game engine technology to render for television production, accepting the reduced accuracy for the boost in render speed.

Using only these techniques, the teaser trailer for my personal project Starfish Ninja was rendered in full HD at around 2-4 frames per second on a modest workstation, compared to around 2-4 minutes per frame in Mental Ray. While this is not a mature workflow by any means, I would love to see more development that makes use of the GPU for faster rendering on non-photo real productions. The article explores both the pros and cons, so take a look and see what you think.

Also included in the discussion are topics like Source Filmmaker , Unreal and Crysis game engines, Autodesk technology previews , and the Maya render plugin FurryBall .

Cheers!
 
Old 08-28-2012, 10:25 PM   #2
doffer
Keying everything
 
doffer's Avatar
portfolio
Christoffer Andersen
Animator
Valence, France
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 921
Very nice!
There was a sci fi project on these forums once, made ingame. I think maybe with cryengine?
Anyways, that was super interesting, and for a while I wanted to make something this way. Though going through a game engine was a bit of a showstopper for me.

I think it's super interesting to see the viewport develop capabilities of modern game engines. This way, we can do stuff like you write about, without leaving maya.
I can't wait to try out this new technology in... maya 2014 I guess
__________________
Website
Steam Punk Challenge
 
Old 08-29-2012, 11:47 AM   #3
fablefox
Lord of the posts
portfolio
Azhar Mat Zin
Fable Fox
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,162
Wink what about this

http://furryball.aaa-studio.eu/

Too busy to read/watch the articles, but there is a real time renderer for maya. although i never used it (not a maya user, and my gfx card is old anyway).
 
Old 08-29-2012, 02:27 PM   #4
Dillster
Always Learning
 
Dillster's Avatar
portfolio
Dylan Saunders
Dublin, Ireland
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 2,725
2-4 frames per second is very respectable.
__________________
I like to learn.
 
Old 08-30-2012, 03:20 PM   #5
EightBit
Lord of the posts
Mitch Rosefelt
OutThereSumwhere, USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,044
This is great! (both the technique and your animation).
I had just spent some time reading up on sourceFilmmaker and was considering how much work it would be for a total non-gamer to learn how to use it.
Any chance you would be willing to create and share a simple scene with some dummy objects so we can study how you put the various layers together?
Thanks.
__________________
If animation couldn't change the world, it wouldn't be such a Micky-Mouse place.
 
Old 08-30-2012, 04:03 PM   #6
doffer
Keying everything
 
doffer's Avatar
portfolio
Christoffer Andersen
Animator
Valence, France
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 921
You should check out this blog as well:

http://cryenginefilmtools.blogspot.dk/
__________________
Website
Steam Punk Challenge
 
Old 08-31-2012, 02:11 AM   #7
EightBit
Lord of the posts
Mitch Rosefelt
OutThereSumwhere, USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,044
That is also interesting.
There is also a beautiful Crysis map on Seith's page here:
http://seithcg.com/wordpress/?page_id=48

It appears that gaming technology has advanced to the point where it is poised to takeover a much larger chunk of CG production.
Even in joweedee's VP 2.0 project, game shaders make the whole thing easier (or perhaps are essential).

Looking at sourceFilmmaker, and the Crysis examples, I see the tools are incredibly advanced for creating environments and animation, though in the examples I've seen the character faces are still pretty stiff.
I've never modded anything and have no idea how work in any of the game engines.
Obviously I could learn, but how would one choose which engine and is it worth the effort?
Or is VP 2.0 going to be the non-gamers way of using this type of technology?
__________________
If animation couldn't change the world, it wouldn't be such a Micky-Mouse place.
 
Old 08-31-2012, 03:30 AM   #8
Zendorf
synapse farmer
portfolio
James Redmond
Sydney, Australia
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 875
Very interesting workflow that you are using Joe. I love the teaser and the characters....very original In some ways it reminds me of the Killer Bean series, having simple quirky characters with martial arts action.

I look forward to seeing more of it in the future.
 
Old 08-31-2012, 06:47 PM   #9
Venkman
Don't cross the streams
 
Venkman's Avatar
portfolio
Peter Venkman
Frederick, USA
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 3,540
Here's an animated short rendered in Unity:

http://video.unity3d.com/video/6912...caJkT%2Fg%3D%3D

It looks pretty tight. I love the idea of having Unreal/CryEngine/Unity etc as renderers I can output to in Cinema 4d, Maya, etc. For most of my purposes it would be just fine.
 
Old 09-01-2012, 04:16 AM   #10
EightBit
Lord of the posts
Mitch Rosefelt
OutThereSumwhere, USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,044
That is incredible!
But still, the faces have a lo-res look to them.
In what format would you output from a game engine into a 3D program?
Seems like we'd want the realtime rendering and beautiful environments from the game engines and be able to use a bit higher res models of our characters/objects of interest.
__________________
If animation couldn't change the world, it wouldn't be such a Micky-Mouse place.
 
Old 09-02-2012, 06:13 AM   #11
DuttyFoot
Expert
 
DuttyFoot's Avatar
stephen curah
USA
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 3,427


the env on this site is pretty mind blowing
__________________
Heights of great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight, but they while their companions slept were toiling upwards in the night.
 
Old 09-02-2012, 07:53 AM   #12
Panupat
Expert
 
Panupat's Avatar
portfolio
Panupat Chong
Thailand
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,942
Quote:
Originally Posted by Venkman
Here's an animated short rendered in Unity:

http://video.unity3d.com/video/6912...caJkT%2Fg%3D%3D

It looks pretty tight. I love the idea of having Unreal/CryEngine/Unity etc as renderers I can output to in Cinema 4d, Maya, etc. For most of my purposes it would be just fine.

I want to appreciate the rendering... but the editing was really distracting and annoying.
 
Old 09-04-2012, 05:00 PM   #13
johweedee
Frequenter
 
johweedee's Avatar
portfolio
Joe Daniels
Animator/Animation Instructor
Ex'pression College
Alameda, US
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 115
Thanks for the comments, everyone.

@Doffer
Thanks for the link. The art in that project is beautiful. I will look into CryEngine more. Specifically for my project, I love that the engine has some pretty fantastic water shaders with realtime displacement: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPGu8AGV9X4

@EightBit
There definitely are ways to extract models from game engines, but it seems like currently the technique would be to put the assets together to light and render in a game engine, and then take to compositing or editing. If the engine does what is needed, it probably wouldn't make sense to bring it back to maya. Viewport 2.0 is its own sort of game engine, so to speak, or it's closer to that than the regular viewport. There are definite advantages to keeping everything inside Maya, though.

Those images from SeithCG are wonderful. So much detail, in real-time. Real-time refraction boggles my mind. Not that it exists, but that everyone in the entertainment industry wouldn't be begging for this immediately.

People like to point out that it's not "realistic", but I like to remind people that raytraced reflections didn't come to Pixar films until Cars. So Finding Nemo had "unrealistic" reflections. We bought it though, because the style was consistent and the art was amazing. It's not the algorithm, but the artist that makes great art.

@Venkman
Thanks for sharing the Unity link.


I'm interested to ask, does anyone here has experience with the CryEngine Sandbox for Cinema? There was a video that came out a while ago, but I'm having trouble finding where you can download, or purchase. Or anyone with tips on the CryEngine, feel free to share opinions.

~Joe
 
Old 09-04-2012, 07:26 PM   #14
johweedee
Frequenter
 
johweedee's Avatar
portfolio
Joe Daniels
Animator/Animation Instructor
Ex'pression College
Alameda, US
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 115
Here's another link showing more of CryEngine 3 for film. It takes Alembic caches, which would be the optimum way to export animation for rendering there. Start watching at 2:40

http://youtu.be/K7JV-5a0Mdw
 
Old 09-04-2012, 09:31 PM   #15
Venkman
Don't cross the streams
 
Venkman's Avatar
portfolio
Peter Venkman
Frederick, USA
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 3,540
Quote:
Originally Posted by johweedee
Here's another link showing more of CryEngine 3 for film. It takes Alembic caches, which would be the optimum way to export animation for rendering there. Start watching at 2:40

http://youtu.be/K7JV-5a0Mdw



Ooooo, cinema 4d just got alembic support. Sounds good to me.... :-)


Can we buy this as a tool for animations yet? Holy smokes.
 
Thread Closed share thread


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
CGSociety
Society of Digital Artists
www.cgsociety.org

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright 2000 - 2006,
Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Minimize Ads
Forum Jump
Miscellaneous

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.