Proportions & Zbrush Practise

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Old 01 January 2014   #16
Hey man! I guess the way I expressed myself wasn't very clear. Sorry! I didn't mean that the arms and legs are crooked, I meant that the spine is crooked. Look at the mesh from the side view carefully and you will see that the center of gravity is way off. The legs need to be pulled back a lot more, and you have to then straighten the torso as well because it will look like he's bending forward, and the head needs adjustment too.

As I mentioned, it's probably easier to make headway if you focus on one aspect to work on. Either the technical side, or the art side. Struggling with both at the same time is pretty painful.

Before you even begin to sculpt anything (and I mean anything, humans, cars, rocks, whatever). You have to make sure that the basic proportions, mass and silhouette are right first. In this case the proportions need a lot more work, and it's basically just a lot easier to fix that in a low mesh cage. Zbrush isn't exactly a newbie friendly tool, and rather than struggling with a new tool, I would suggest building a launch pad from a tool that you already understand.

Keep on truckin' man!
 
Old 01 January 2014   #17
Progress.

Getting happy with the form, a few things worth changing. Shape of shins, curvature of areas like torso and, especially, aspects of face.



 
Old 01 January 2014   #18
Hello Howard,

For your current skill level, I would greatly suggest NOT doing the block out in ZB.

It will be far more beneficial to you to create the block out in a 3d application where you can place the real life photo references of the front and side shots of the body in your viewports, and align your initial block out model to them.

I can't stress this enough.

Cheers,
- Bergquist


PS,
Just as Xiangjun pointed out, having an initial block out with a MUCH lower poly count will be very helpful to you as well to align your model to the photo reference.
 
Old 01 January 2014   #19
Originally Posted by Bergquist: It will be far more beneficial to you to create the block out in a 3d application where you can place the real life photo references of the front and side shots of the body in your viewports, and align your initial block out model to them..


Yeah, I have come to notice that too.
 
Old 01 January 2014   #20
When it comes to sculpting the human form using ZBrush, go to YouTube, and do a search for Ryan Kingslien. He is one of ZBrush's top guys, and he has a load of advice, guidance, and tricks on using ZBrush to sculpt the human form. He also has workshops available (if you can afford them) at www.zbrushworkshops.com but he also has a LOT of free vids out there too.
 
Old 01 January 2014   #21
Originally Posted by Drakaran: He also has workshops available (if you can afford them).


I was thinking about this too. Youtube has only oh so much. Will look into Ryan, with greater intent.

I have resources from University library too- more information the merrier. Right?
 
Old 01 January 2014   #22
Originally Posted by xiangjun: Hey man! I guess the way I expressed myself wasn't very clear. Sorry! I didn't mean that the arms and legs are crooked, I meant that the spine is crooked. Look at the mesh from the side view carefully and you will see that the center of gravity is way off. The legs need to be pulled back a lot more, and you have to then straighten the torso as well because it will look like he's bending forward, and the head needs adjustment too.

As I mentioned, it's probably easier to make headway if you focus on one aspect to work on. Either the technical side, or the art side. Struggling with both at the same time is pretty painful.

Before you even begin to sculpt anything (and I mean anything, humans, cars, rocks, whatever). You have to make sure that the basic proportions, mass and silhouette are right first. In this case the proportions need a lot more work, and it's basically just a lot easier to fix that in a low mesh cage. Zbrush isn't exactly a newbie friendly tool, and rather than struggling with a new tool, I would suggest building a launch pad from a tool that you already understand.

Keep on truckin' man!


Alot of the things you mention I understand and either have begun to fully understand or understand in general.
Thank you, very helpful. Thank you for the encouragement- means alot.
 
Old 01 January 2014   #23
Found a tutorial that talks in detail about the processes.

Went back to 1st subdivision and dynameshed the entire thing, that way I had the proportions yet denser topology to get detail in.
What I am essentially aiming to do now is getting the volume in starting from the bottom (and building up).
Using different tools and methods to get what I see from anatomy observation from places like http://anatomy4sculptors.com/

I think in the future I will model the base mesh in 3DS Max, to get the proprtions sorted easier, then begin this process in ZBrush (which I am quite liking a lot).

Also, what I try to accommodate is the deformation in the animation by bending the elbows slightly. In the future I will either go for A or T pose with straight arms and legs, however I was told that bending the fingers is a good idea because it helps with animation deformation instead of straight ones. Is this a good school of though, to bend the fingers?









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Old 01 January 2014   #24
Fine tuning aspects of the structure. Aimed to get the areas that define the silhouette and create detail from a distance.

Next aiming to sort out the anatomy and structure, then get the skin surface detail in.









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Old 01 January 2014   #25
the hips area is too low. You need to adjust that.
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Old 01 January 2014   #26
Hey dude!

You are really far from adding in anatomical details yet. Your proportions still need a lot of work. In like the first few posts of this thread, you uploaded one of your reference, that pic came from one of Andrew Loomis' books on drawing characters. You should try to find that book and read it cover to cover. Not just look at the drawings, but read what Andrew Loomis wrote.

Forget about anatomy for now man. Focus on getting the proportions right first. Anatomy is more about understanding the science behind it, but to get it to look right, it needs to be on a model where the proportions are spot on.

Check your work dude. Take your latest front view screenshot, bring it into photoshop and lay it over that reference pic. Then you'll know where you have gone wrong.

Also, forget about the face for now. Work on the body first then go on to the face.

TBH, if you want to work on proportions, and train your observation skills, you should be doing still life drawings/paintings. That is the basic of the basic, and if you get that going, you can have a foundation solid enough to help you through most stuff.


Hope this is not too preachy.

XJ
 
Old 01 January 2014   #27
do a search for "eight head figure". That is the proportions for a "heroic" figure. To understand the human body, you have to start at the skeleton as all else is connected to it.

If you'd looked up Ryan's work, that's what he talks about too, and how to see and understand the body from the skeleton out. Any of the good instructors talk about it.
 
Old 01 January 2014   #28








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Old 01 January 2014   #29
Gonna have to put this mini project of mine on hold for a while- there are things with greater priority to deal with at the moment!

Some of it can be seen here: http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthr...401#post7738401

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No Stagnant Skill.
 
Old 01 January 2014   #30
Learnt and understood a lot by posting on here and driving to work & build understanding.

The things learnt on here are being transmitted onto a new project, found here:
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthr...916#post7743916

However, I will return to this character in the future.

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