Sheridan College's admission requirements for Digital Visual Effects course

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  03 March 2011
Question Sheridan College's admission requirements for Digital Visual Effects course

Hi everyone, I am in Grade 11 and planning on going to Sheridan College for Computer Animation - Digital Visual Effects program after Grade 12. The question is this.....I want to attend the Sheridan's digital visual effects program and it requires you to have

1.
Sheridan’s Computer Animation Program or equivalent and
2.
A post secondary diploma or degree in the visual or fine arts and/or
3.
Four years of demonstrated competence through relevant work experience.

Now do I have to take some other computer animation program first then take digital visual effects program ? I am in high school I dont really get what they mean same for number 2 and 3.......can someone help me please with this admission requirements plzzzzzzzz...Thanks in Advanced.
 
  03 March 2011
it sounds to me like it's a specialized course in VFX - so they don't want people who don't already have some knowledge/experience in Computer Animation/arts etc...

from this page HERE
"This intensive, specialized two-semester program prepares you to step directly into a career producing VFX for movies, television, advertising, video games and Web applications. "

'specialized' is the key word here...though frankly this statement is hilariously untrue in the the real world but whatever...

hope that helps...
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  03 March 2011
Originally Posted by arctor: it sounds to me like it's a specialized course in VFX - so they don't want people who don't already have some knowledge/experience in Computer Animation/arts etc...

from this page HERE
"This intensive, specialized two-semester program prepares you to step directly into a career producing VFX for movies, television, advertising, video games and Web applications. "

'specialized' is the key word here...though frankly this statement is hilariously untrue in the the real world but whatever...

hope that helps...

I went there. But I had a degree (bfa) before going. Basically the course is a step2 in your secondary education. You need to fill the gap between grade 12 and that course with 'something.' Particularly if you wanted to be an animator an awsome route would be to do their 3 year (if i remember correctly) traditional animation course (which you can do with grade 12)-or some other of their arts programs-or a program in another institution.
But traditional animation would give you some *serious* chops (their course used to be the best in the world back in the early ninties anyway).

But I doubt a simple 'beginners animation' course at a community colledge will cut it.
But you'll have to confirm that with them. Another route is to work 4 years professionaly-one of my classmates was a professional photographer before he went there.

So lots of work to get in. But if you do its a bargain compared to pretty much any other animation school out there.

Last edited by circusboy : 03 March 2011 at 05:03 PM.
 
  03 March 2011
Don't they have admissions staff there to answer these kinds of questions? I'd be very concerned if they didn't.

There's also a CG Schools forum right on this very site for such questions.
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  03 March 2011
From what I've heard, Sheridan's animation program is not what it was back in the day. To paraphrase what others are saying, here's what you'll need:

1. Complete high school, ready to enter college.
2. A 3 year diploma art course - qualified examples are Sheridan's classical animation program, Sheridan's Illustration program, or some equivalent (a 3 year photography diploma, a 3 year media arts diploma, etc).
3. After you get your 3 year art diploma, then you can take the 1 year Computer animation post-diploma program (might be more than 1 year now).
4. After all that, THEN you can take the Sheridan Digital Visual Effects program.

Steps 2 to 4 can be replaced with work in the field...but then you most likely wouldn't need the program.

You can also choose to go to Seneca's (or some other school's) Computer Animation course, where you can choose character animation or visual effects. Not suggesting that is a better route at all, but I have worked with many people that took that course and are well into their careers now.

Sheridan will give you a deep art background, which is very valuable for many reasons...but not at all "required" to find work as a CG artist. Download some free software if you haven't already, start learning, and if you stick with it and can learn on your own, you may not even need to go to school at all to get in the field (I never did).
 
  03 March 2011
You made a similar thread a couple days ago, asking which school to go to, and you didn't listen to anyones advice.

You'd be better off investing the tuitions fee's then enrolling in these school because you will be lost before the end of the first semestar.

Seriously, take a year or two and get some fundamental training in before you go to private school.

The instructors will not cater to your lack of knowedge, they will let you sink and move on to those who have the potential.

I'm sorry if this sounds harsh but it is the reality you are faced with.
 
  03 March 2011
you need a 4 year prerequisite to enroll in a 4 year program? wtf?!

Originally Posted by kemijo: From what I've heard, Sheridan's animation program is not what it was back in the day. To paraphrase what others are saying, here's what you'll need:

1. Complete high school, ready to enter college.
2. A 3 year diploma art course - qualified examples are Sheridan's classical animation program, Sheridan's Illustration program, or some equivalent (a 3 year photography diploma, a 3 year media arts diploma, etc).
3. After you get your 3 year art diploma, then you can take the 1 year Computer animation post-diploma program (might be more than 1 year now).
4. After all that, THEN you can take the Sheridan Digital Visual Effects program.

Steps 2 to 4 can be replaced with work in the field...but then you most likely wouldn't need the program.

You can also choose to go to Seneca's (or some other school's) Computer Animation course, where you can choose character animation or visual effects. Not suggesting that is a better route at all, but I have worked with many people that took that course and are well into their careers now.

Sheridan will give you a deep art background, which is very valuable for many reasons...but not at all "required" to find work as a CG artist. Download some free software if you haven't already, start learning, and if you stick with it and can learn on your own, you may not even need to go to school at all to get in the field (I never did).
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  03 March 2011
Sheridan's vfx program has been that way since the 80's. So its nothing new.
Cheap tuition and hundred's (maybe more) of applicants per session for less than thirty spots.
Applicants qualify with a portfolio.

So-yup they filter.

Edit: The VFX program is (or used to be) one year (not 4).

Last edited by circusboy : 03 March 2011 at 03:34 PM.
 
  03 March 2011
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