Starting CG Arts for technical ppl

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Old 11 November 2010   #1
Starting CG Arts for technical ppl

Hi guys,

I am currently studying for a CS degree, but I would also like to start learning CG art as a side thing( from the artistic perspective) . I am considering on going further with my education on CG( technical side ). Thus, I think its better to learn both parts of the industry.

Besides, starting this stuff may give me a break from CS subjects .

If I would like to start CG arts, would it be better if I'd start with some basic drawing classes or should I get directly involved with modelling and stuff. I have some basic knowledge of applications like Max, Blender, Maya and I have done a few tutorials in them.

However there are parts of tutorials where one is instructed to " change your objects that they resemble a figure" (which you can see in the book/video) . Since I do not have an artistic vision I am sometimes having a hard time doing that.
 
Old 11 November 2010   #2
If you dont have artistic background.. you just cant expect your animation or models to look good, why? cause you need to learn the human figure, its proportions, what goes where, how it works in conjunction with all the other parts, perspective, now this is just my opinion: Drawing experience is a must, if you want to succed in CG.

So my advice, take drawing classes, practice a lot, learn the figure, draw from life, meanwhile, you can learn how to use the software, like getting used to the user interface and what does what, so when you are ready to move on to CG, you go right to the good stuff, cause you already know how the software works.
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Old 11 November 2010   #3
Originally Posted by jesse92: If you dont have artistic background.. you just cant expect your animation or models to look good, why? cause you need to learn the human figure, its proportions, what goes where, how it works in conjunction with all the other parts, perspective, now this is just my opinion: Drawing experience is a must, if you want to succed in CG.

So my advice, take drawing classes, practice a lot, learn the figure, draw from life, meanwhile, you can learn how to use the software, like getting used to the user interface and what does what, so when you are ready to move on to CG, you go right to the good stuff, cause you already know how the software works.


Well, what you say does make sense. I was wondering though, if there were people that succeeded just by starting to use the software.

But anyway, I think that if I am going to go down this road its good to do it properly .
 
Old 12 December 2010   #4
Originally Posted by Avrdan: Well, what you say does make sense. I was wondering though, if there were people that succeeded just by starting to use the software.


Quite a few people have. The really important thing is that you practice working from life. This tends to be a lot easier with traditional media, but you can do it on the computer if you really want to.
 
Old 12 December 2010   #5
I learned 3D modeling (and the "artistic" side) with lots of practice and feedback from mentors. My background was programming, math, physics, and AI. I did pick up a drawing course. You can learn from other background experience that you already have. For example, after working out in the gym for years, I knew what each muscle "did," but I had to learn how to better sculpt the human form after practicing sculpting and getting feedback. It was not too difficult, but it took time.

I've found that my technical background gives me advantages. Programmers (good ones) must be tenacious and organized, for example. I remember one lighting and rendering course that I took with mostly artistic students. Initially I struggled, but I put in a lot more time than them and soaked up every detail of the instructor's critiques. In some cases I reworked an assignment project three or four times. At the end of the course, the instructor (that actually worked in the industry and taught as an adjunct) told me that I made the most progress of all the students. I analyzed each critique and then tweaked my work and improved it. I still have a lot to learn, but I will share something that I've learned from life. You cannot prevent getting knocked on your butt in life, but no one can stop you from getting up and moving forward. Even if it takes me longer to learn something, I will learn it and I will improve. With that attitude you will succeed even if your artistic skill is not as high as others. But, if you have technical skills you will understand scripting and other technical aspects that more artistically inclined people might struggle to implement. There are many people that cannot ("give up," etc.) learn programming, math, physics, etc. If you can learn technical things well you can learn artistic things. I don't subscribe to the left/right brain, tech/artisitc "school" of psychology. I'm like the bumblebee, I just fly (even if I bump into lots of stuff).

Last edited by FrankIowa : 12 December 2010 at 05:39 PM.
 
Old 12 December 2010   #6
This is an easy one to answer.

Remember when you first tried to learn your first program code?
Most likely it was completely overwhelming and only started to make sense to you after you created a whole bunch of very simple examples like this:
if(this is true)
{
Do This;
}
else
{
Do that;
}


The same type of learning curve applies to the art side.
You'll first create the mesh equivelent of an if-else stament. A very simple cartoonish looking thingy that doesn't look very exciting.
And after you do this a couple of dozen times or so. You'll start to become more comfortable with the whole feel of the process. And you'll gradually start adding more complexity to your stuff.

It's a process, and it takes a long time to get good at it. Just like learning how to write code takes a long time to get good at.
But they both have similar learning curves... where you start out very simple. Do that simple thing a whole bunch of times until you can do it in your sleep. Then gradually build on that and add new techniques as you go.

-ScottA
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Old 12 December 2010   #7
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