Going the Self Taught Route

Become a member of the CGSociety

Connect, Share, and Learn with our Large Growing CG Art Community. It's Free!

THREAD CLOSED
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  04 April 2010
well one thing's for sure, the self taught route is the most painful one, it's like fumbling in the dark as you struggle to learn and you have to make lots of mistakes before you really get the concept but that's how you really harden yourself to be good
 
  04 April 2010
I'd also suggest taking some local art courses to supplement your personal CG training. Learning the artistic fundamentals is something I've lacked while teaching myself and am now realizing would have been invaluable had I picked it up years ago... so please don't forget that!
__________________
ComboMash Entertainment Inc
Website | Twitter | Facebook | IndieDB | PressKit
 
  04 April 2010
Unhappy Advice

Hey everyone. Right now i'm wondering if I made the right move.

I'm about to get my undergraduate degree in Illustration, and I was accepted into the MFA Computer Art program at SVA. I'm not sure exactly what field I want to get into, whether it be modeling for movies, games, or animation.

Yesterday, the $1000 deposit for SVA was due and I faxed it out and I'm wondering if I should just go the self-taught route instead. I have a good background in drawing, painting and some digital painting. I've been teaching myself Maya and ZBrush for the past couple months and I feel confident in my ability to learn, there are a couple examples on my website http://blog.davidmerrique.com/

Do you think SVA is a good idea or should I continue teaching myself?
 
  04 April 2010
Since you already have an undergraduate of a related field, I don't think you need to spend more money and time into a master degree, unless you want to be professor or researcher.

I am personally holding a master degree of computer science, but because I wanted to do research and software engineering of computer graphics technologies.

If you goal is to be a modeler and get a job in the studios, the reel is the most important thing you should focus on.

Online tutorials and some Gnomon workshops could teach you the tools. And, just practicing and polishing your reel until you landed a job.
__________________
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm4400105/
 
  04 April 2010
Aye, unless you want to teach it's really not necessary if you're confident you can learn on your own. Even then, there are quite a few teaching gigs that only require a bachelor's.


The one thing it may help you with is making a decision on what direction you want to head. Unfortunately, that's a pretty heavy investment just to help with a decision, but some people need it.
__________________
Portfolio : Blog
 
  04 April 2010
Yeah, if you want to be in an art type field and do not want to get into a serious educational career, a masters degree will be overkill. You cant go wrong with more education but you should contemplate your direction before making that commitment. Your work is solid, now you just need direction.
__________________
Regards,

Todd Palamar

www.speffects.com
 
  04 April 2010
oops wrong thread
__________________
"It's not wrong. It's stylized."

Last edited by DoctorMonkeyFist : 04 April 2010 at 10:40 PM.
 
  04 April 2010
Originally Posted by Krymzon40: Hey everyone. Right now i'm wondering if I made the right move.

I'm about to get my undergraduate degree in Illustration, and I was accepted into the MFA Computer Art program at SVA. I'm not sure exactly what field I want to get into, whether it be modeling for movies, games, or animation.

Yesterday, the $1000 deposit for SVA was due and I faxed it out and I'm wondering if I should just go the self-taught route instead. I have a good background in drawing, painting and some digital painting. I've been teaching myself Maya and ZBrush for the past couple months and I feel confident in my ability to learn, there are a couple examples on my website http://blog.davidmerrique.com/

Do you think SVA is a good idea or should I continue teaching myself?


Hi Krymzon,

SVA is an excellent idea. Their MFA program was one of the first anywhere, and they are still one of the best. Their classes are taught by professionals from the industry. An MFA will allow you to teach, and coupling your illustration degree with their CA degree is a very good match. And you will be in New York, which will put you in tune with a primary market for computer graphics. You will be among the very best in a fairly competitive and collaborative environment.

If you can afford it, apply yourself and persevere, I don't think you will be disappointed.

Full disclosure: I used to teach for SVA at their short lived Savannah campus in the late 90s, and I got to know some of the folks from New York. Good people!

I wish you luck!

Excelsior!
Eric Kunzendorf
 
  04 April 2010
If you already have an undergrad, you can definitely go the self learning route. My best friend did his undergrad in fine arts. But all CG (animation) was self taught. So it is doable. But getting a minimum undergraduate degree in some related field could be helpful to get feet wet with some no-name studios. Then again I guess if you have a killer portfolio, nothing else would matter I suppose.
__________________
There is only one difference between a long life and a good dinner: that, in the dinner, the sweets come last.
 
  04 April 2010
Thanks

Thanks for all your suggestions. I took most of your advice, a professor's advice and my gut's advice. I'll be skipping SVA (for now at least). One of the reasons i was unsure is that I'm not very impressed by the MFA work on their website . It seems like I'm already there, or close in terms of modeling skill and I've only been doing it for about 3 months. Here's something I've been working on Dancer

I'll be taking the self-taught route, thank's to the internet, this is very possible.
 
  04 April 2010
if your going self taught take a looksy at digital tutors, they are really good. I'm not sure how you learn but I hate books I need to see videos and such. But they have a pretty large selection of all kinds of programs and its decently priced. And of course Gnomon DVDs. Figured I'd put in my two bits.

Good luck on your learning
__________________
Nicholi Conterno - Gnomon Student

Time To Answer A Question: 15 Minutes
Time To Thank Someone For An Answer: 30 Seconds

Post of Wisdom
 
  04 April 2010
I agree with MrConterno, DT(digital tutors) are a good place to start................after u've gotten all your software and you understand what it is you want to be learning. I started using their materials for a year and i can say i'm pretty good with Maya now.
Like someone already said ..............it could and it WILL get lonely teaching ur'self stuff but if you are focused and dedicated you can master a key area of CG in a year!
 
  04 April 2010
Thread automatically closed

This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.
__________________
CGTalk Policy/Legalities
Note that as CGTalk Members, you agree to the terms and conditions of using this website.
 
Thread Closed share thread



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
CGSociety
Society of Digital Artists
www.cgsociety.org

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright 2000 - 2006,
Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Minimize Ads
Forum Jump
Miscellaneous

All times are GMT. The time now is 11:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.