Graduates condemned to 'coffee shop jobs'

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Old 03 March 2010   #1
Graduates condemned to 'coffee shop jobs'

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/educatio...-shop-jobs.html

There appears to be much controversy about higher education in the UK at the moment with fees (maybe going up) and college losing millions of investment form the UK Government. Also there is a major debate about 'Soft courses' like media studies certain arts like CG or Digital stuff. There is also a recession going on or should I say a slow response of coming out of this recession.

So education is being knocked from all sides and the chances of finding employment after much investment of time/effort and finances in one of these soft option courses seems bleak.

What would you if your where a college lecture teaching CG say to this years graduating students?
Put your self in the lectures shoes. Would you ignore it and say nothing or you would say ..........

(It would be interesting to hear CG Talk (people with experience) posters what their advice would be)....

Thanks to all replies
 
Old 03 March 2010   #2
Originally Posted by notsosure: There is also a recession going on or should I say a slow response of coming out of this recession.


Just yesterday I was reading an article in the news about how visual effects is going to be added to the skills shortage list in the UK. Because the fact is that studios struggle all the time to find people to fill vacancies. Graduates not being able to find work has a lot less to do with the economic environment and a lot more to do with simply falling short of the required skill levels. And while it's easy (and often quite fair) to point the finger of blame at schools for offering such extraordinarily shit courses in increasingly popular fields like CG, there is also a responsibility on behalf of all of those wanting to get into these industries to get off their arses and actually make an effort to develop their skills too. People don't get jobs based on degrees or other certifications, they get jobs based on their portfolios.

Quote: What would you if your where a college lecture teaching CG say to this years graduating students?


I don't want to be a grammar nazi, but I honestly had to read this a couple of times to understand what you're asking. Anyway, if I was an instructor, I'd simply tell everyone that it's up to them to understand the requirements of the industry, and to ensure that they work hard enough to meet those demands. Courses are there to teach them the fundamentals, but they need to build on that themselves. Instructors who hold their students' hands throughout courses are doing more harm than good - students have a responsibility to themselves to develop a critical eye when it comes to viewing their own work. Out of every graduating class, the ones who get the jobs are always the ones who took the initiative to better themselves at every opportunity.
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Old 03 March 2010   #3
Originally Posted by leigh: Just yesterday I was reading an article in the news about how visual effects is going to be added to the skills shortage list in the UK. Because the fact is that studios struggle all the time to find people to fill vacancies. Graduates not being able to find work has a lot less to do with the economic environment and a lot more to do with simply falling short of the required skill levels.


Agreed. Even now, when the recession is still selling tabloids and convincing everyone that the end is near, there are so many vacancies here in London.

I honestly cannot imagine anyone with a strong (read: professional quality) reel failing to land a gig in London right now.
 
Old 03 March 2010   #4
I don't know why, I thought it was an opposite sort of situation in London. Again, only perception, but I thought there was a huge 3d talent base in London..and don't really bother to try and get in from the outside. Not sure where I heard that, but interesting to hear it's not the case.

As for what to tell any new graduates, Leigh is right on the money.
 
Old 03 March 2010   #5
Keep in mind that Leigh is talking about the need for skilled workers, not entry-level. So while they may need people, they won`t just be taking anyone who has touched 3D.
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Old 03 March 2010   #6
Originally Posted by grantmoore3d: Keep in mind that Leigh is talking about the need for skilled workers, not entry-level. So while they may need people, they won`t just be taking anyone who has touched 3D.


Very true. Education here in NZ isn't that great; but it's more an issue from un-motivated un-directed students then any institute's fault.

I find students are more keen to do what they "like best" (read: 80% going into modeling and animation). Personally I specialized in areas I knew the industry needed; had no problem getting a job. But there are many people who go into the course, start off interested in the early part, and never get past modeling and animation. No wonder competition in those fields is high.
 
Old 03 March 2010   #7
Quote: Just yesterday I was reading an article in the news about how visual effects is going to be added to the skills shortage list in the UK. Because the fact is that studios struggle all the time to find people to fill vacancies. Graduates not being able to find work has a lot less to do with the economic environment and a lot more to do with simply falling short of the required skill levels. And while it's easy (and often quite fair) to point the finger of blame at schools for offering such extraordinarily shit courses in increasingly popular fields like CG, there is also a responsibility on behalf of all of those wanting to get into these industries to get off their arses and actually make an effort to develop their skills too. People don't get jobs based on degrees or other certifications, they get jobs based on their portfolios.


Is this article online ?
 
Old 03 March 2010   #8
It was online, but I can't find it now. Typical.
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Old 03 March 2010   #9
I still can't locate the article, but here is a PDF directly from the UK home office:

http://www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/si...upationlist.pdf

It seems that many CG positions are already on the list:

Quote: the following roles within visual effects and 2D/3D
computer animation for film, television or video games:
- animation supervisor
- animator
- computer graphics supervisor
- technical director
- VFX supervisor
- modeller
- rigging supervisor
- rigger
- matte painter
- texture artist
- compositing artist
- producer
- production manager
- editor
- R&D tools
- R&D software
- software engineer
- system engineer
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Old 03 March 2010   #10
That's some interesting news. I wonder if that would give us international people who apply a better chance.
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Old 03 March 2010   #11
In the last six to twelve months, it seems that a lot of Americans have been arriving in Soho and starting work in the big VFX studios.
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Old 03 March 2010   #12
Hmm, that is good news to me =). I actually have some family moving to London in a few months. Maybe I shall try to send some resumes out that way.
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Old 03 March 2010   #13
Originally Posted by leigh: In the last six to twelve months, it seems that a lot of Americans have been arriving in Soho and starting work in the big VFX studios.


Damn Americans, They tuck er jerbs.
Rabble Rabble Rabble.
I just had to.

haha
 
Old 03 March 2010   #14
UCAS search

If one does a UCAS search; on their website there are 338 courses in CG

UCAS search

Computer graphics = 95

Animation = 243

Some are HND/2 year foundation but most are BA/BSC.

If each course delivered 20 students per graduation year that makes 6760 potential candidates for this vacuum of places for employment in these VFX comp in Soho.
Surely out of the 6760 potential candidates they must be able to fill these jobs?
Also there are loads of Arty students that mess around with 3D and Computer application to make their art so 6760 people is a very low estimate.

If only a few are good at what they can do then quite clearly the courses must be off at a complete tangent.

Why is that?

And what are these lectures telling the students as loads get 2:1 2:2 in this filed of study.
 
Old 03 March 2010   #15
Yeah but out of the 6760 graduates you need to factor in that maybe only 10% of them are any good.
Originally Posted by notsosure: If one does a UCAS search; on their website there are 338 courses in CG

UCAS search

Computer graphics = 95

Animation = 243

Some are HND/2 year foundation but most are BA/BSC.

If each course delivered 20 students per graduation year that makes 6760 potential candidates for this vacuum of places for employment in these VFX comp in Soho.
Surely out of the 6760 potential candidates they must be able to fill these jobs?
Also there are loads of Arty students that mess around with 3D and Computer application to make their art so 6760 people is a very low estimate.

If only a few are good at what they can do then quite clearly the courses must be off at a complete tangent.

Why is that?

And what are these lectures telling the students as loads get 2:1 2:2 in this filed of study.
 
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