Please Help Me!

Become a member of the CGSociety

Connect, Share, and Learn with our Large Growing CG Art Community. It's Free!

THREAD CLOSED
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  03 March 2010
Please Help Me!

Hello,

My name is Joseph Lau. I want an education that will land me a career in 3D Animation & Visual Effects for films and such. I am more interested in the modeling and texturing aspects than animation and visual effects. I am unemployed and dependent on my widowed mother; we do not have a lot of money. Also, I am not already skilled in traditional art, so I am starting right from scratch.

I graduated high school in 2008 and have been attending City College of San Francisco ever since. Not until recently have I started following a guide to transfer from CCSF to Academy of Art University for their BFA program in Animation & Visual Effects. In total, I would be transferring 30 units of Liberal Art courses from CCSF and starting as a sophomore upon transferring there. However, I am looking for cheaper ways to obtain my education.

Under such circumstances, what do you guys suggest I do? Stick to my plan to transfer from CCSF to AAU or do something else? Should I disregard a degree and just go with certificate/diploma/self enrichment courses/programs? Should I build my foundation in traditional art in community college or state universities first and then look for a specific 3D program separately? I need some kind of plan, so help appreciated!
__________________
O====[[:::::SenseofTouch:::::>>
 
  03 March 2010
Hi Joseph.

In the area of 3d I am self taught and when I started as an industrial designer there
were no computers . I know very little about the complexities of the education system,
but one thing I know is that your port folio is still the most important aspect in
landing a job. Also in the beginning getting to know people and selling your skills is
also very effective. Read 'Getting a Job in Computer Animation' by Ed Harris.

Also read this from Ben Mathis, it also applies to films:
http://www.poopinmymouth.com/tutori...t_training.html
http://www.poopinmymouth.com/tutorial/money_mouth.htm

Schools that will teach you what you need to make your port folio stand out (assuming you
are talented) like Gnomon and VFS are around 50,000 dollars a year. Most employers will
only be looking at your Folio, not at your qualifications, unless you are going for a
teaching job.

You can learn all you need to know on your own. Just use the best folios on the web as
your guide and be determined. You will probably need some other job as a source of income
while you are learning.

May the force be with you man.
__________________
The terminal velocity of individual particles is directly related to pink rabbits on a bank holiday.
Characters, Games, Toys
 
  03 March 2010
Get a bachelor's degree at least.
It sounds like you might lack the funds for the pricier schools like AAU, so check out some cheaper alternatives:
http://www.sjsuai.com/ai/Welcome.html
http://www.deanza.edu/animation/
http://www.gnomonschool.com/ (not quite as cheap)
You have no traditional art skills so you have your work cut out for you. I would highly recommend getting into photography and traditional sculpture and figure drawing if you are interested in modeling and texturing.

right in your backyard:
http://www.freedomofteach.com/workshops/

I would recommend getting traditional art training at local universities then brushing up on 3d via professional training. At least you will have a degree to fall back on should dropping 60K on a certificate not pan out.
 
  03 March 2010
Originally Posted by Kanga: Hi Joseph.

In the area of 3d I am self taught and when I started as an industrial designer there
were no computers . I know very little about the complexities of the education system,
but one thing I know is that your port folio is still the most important aspect in
landing a job. Also in the beginning getting to know people and selling your skills is
also very effective. Read 'Getting a Job in Computer Animation' by Ed Harris.

Also read this from Ben Mathis, it also applies to films:
http://www.poopinmymouth.com/tutori...t_training.html
http://www.poopinmymouth.com/tutorial/money_mouth.htm

Schools that will teach you what you need to make your port folio stand out (assuming you
are talented) like Gnomon and VFS are around 50,000 dollars a year. Most employers will
only be looking at your Folio, not at your qualifications, unless you are going for a
teaching job.

You can learn all you need to know on your own. Just use the best folios on the web as
your guide and be determined. You will probably need some other job as a source of income
while you are learning.

May the force be with you man.

Thanks, Kanga, I will read those.

Originally Posted by forsakendreams: Get a bachelor's degree at least.
It sounds like you might lack the funds for the pricier schools like AAU, so check out some cheaper alternatives:
http://www.sjsuai.com/ai/Welcome.html
http://www.deanza.edu/animation/
http://www.gnomonschool.com/ (not quite as cheap)
You have no traditional art skills so you have your work cut out for you. I would highly recommend getting into photography and traditional sculpture and figure drawing if you are interested in modeling and texturing.

right in your backyard:
http://www.freedomofteach.com/workshops/

I would recommend getting traditional art training at local universities then brushing up on 3d via professional training. At least you will have a degree to fall back on should dropping 60K on a certificate not pan out.

I've actually been looking a bit into SJSU lately. Suppose I choose SJSU, do I go with the BFA program in Animation/Illustration? If so, upon obtaining that degree, should I then find a program specifying 3D; that is, in pursuit of my career goals?
__________________
O====[[:::::SenseofTouch:::::>>
 
  03 March 2010
Originally Posted by SenseofTouch: Thanks, Kanga, I will read those.


I've actually been looking a bit into SJSU lately. Suppose I choose SJSU, do I go with the BFA program in Animation/Illustration? If so, upon obtaining that degree, should I then find a program specifying 3D; that is, in pursuit of my career goals?


They do teach a bit of 3D at SJSU, but they'd like their students to have a solid traditional art background first.

Here's work from their 3D modeling class.
http://www.shrunkenheadman.com/illu...allery.php?g=38

You should contact either of the program coordinators. They're very nice and could probably answer a few questions. http://www.sjsuai.com/ai/Faculty.html

I didn't attend this program (although I would have liked to) due to scheduling conflicts. My reasons being that double majoring in both computer science and art is very difficult since both disciplines require a ton of work. Now that I look back on it, I wish I did put up with the difficulties and just pursue both.

Last edited by gawl126 : 03 March 2010 at 10:41 PM.
 
  03 March 2010
Originally Posted by gawl126: They do teach a bit of 3D at SJSU, but they'd like their students to have a solid traditional art background first.

Here's work from their 3D modeling class.
http://www.shrunkenheadman.com/illu...allery.php?g=38

So basically, I don't even need to go to schools that specialize in 3D like Gnomon since SJSU already teaches it? I know it's probably not as strong, but with the foundation they help students build plus the 3D class, I can start developing my skills in 3D modeling and texturing pretty much on my own from there correct? Also, is it just a class in 3D or is there a program involved specializing in 3D?
__________________
O====[[:::::SenseofTouch:::::>>

Last edited by SenseofTouch : 03 March 2010 at 10:45 PM.
 
  03 March 2010
Originally Posted by SenseofTouch: So basically, I don't even need to go to schools that specializes in 3D like Gnomon since SJSU already teaches it? I know it's probably not as strong, but with the foundation they help students build plus the 3D class, I can start developing my skills in 3D modeling and texturing pretty much on my own from there correct? Also, is it just a class in 3D or is there a program involved specializing in 3D?


Programs like Gnomon go beyond what SJSU teaches in 3D. SJSU has a class that will teach you 3D modeling and there are classes that will teach you either 2D or 3D animation. These classes are part of their animation/illustration program and are basically your electives. Electives are classes you choose to take outside the required classes. They're also needed to graduate and they pretty much define what your focus will be within the animation/illustration program. Some people will specialize in 2D animation and will take only 2D animation electives. Others like yourself will be taking 3D related course electives.

You can also start learning anything on your own. The only thing that stands in your way is possibly yourself. There are free resources out there for learning, but some people develop better in a learning environment (like me). There are plenty of books to read, hit up your local library and check them out.
 
  03 March 2010
Originally Posted by gawl126: Programs like Gnomon go beyond what SJSU teaches in 3D. SJSU has a class that will teach you 3D modeling and there are classes that will teach you either 2D or 3D animation. These classes are part of their animation/illustration program and are basically your electives. Electives are classes you choose to take outside the required classes. They're also needed to graduate and they pretty much define what your focus will be within the animation/illustration program. Some people will specialize in 2D animation and will take only 2D animation electives. Others like yourself will be taking 3D related course electives.

You can also start learning anything on your own. The only thing that stands in your way is possibly yourself. There are free resources out there for learning, but some people develop better in a learning environment (like me). There are plenty of books to read, hit up your local library and check them out.

Thanks, I emailed one of the program coordinators. I'll see how it goes and I'll post back later.
__________________
O====[[:::::SenseofTouch:::::>>

Last edited by SenseofTouch : 03 March 2010 at 10:45 PM.
 
  03 March 2010
hi
i think if you are broke and your family has no money you should get a few tutorial dvd's and do many free tutorials along with an internship at a studio. try tippett in berkeley or ilm or something of the kind in the bay area. i think college in this instance would be a waste of money with loads of useless prerequisites you need to pay for. if in the future you would like to expand your knowledge/education you can always take classes even slowly get your degree taking a class or two in addition to having a paying job.
__________________
www.neurobasics.com

 
  03 March 2010
Originally Posted by neurobasics: hi
i think if you are broke and your family has no money you should get a few tutorial dvd's and do many free tutorials along with an internship at a studio. try tippett in berkeley or ilm or something of the kind in the bay area. i think college in this instance would be a waste of money with loads of useless prerequisites you need to pay for. if in the future you would like to expand your knowledge/education you can always take classes even slowly get your degree taking a class or two in addition to having a paying job.


How do you get internships without any education or skills? Don't I have to go to school to get an internship?
__________________
O====[[:::::SenseofTouch:::::>>
 
  03 March 2010
Originally Posted by SenseofTouch: How do you get internships without any education or skills? Don't I have to go to school to get an internship?


I'm fairly certain you do..
 
  03 March 2010
Originally Posted by SenseofTouch: How do you get internships without any education or skills? Don't I have to go to school to get an internship?


Yeah, you do need to be enrolled in school to even qualify to apply for an internship and you also need to meet requirements for the position of course. Most people, at least that I know of, don't get an internship until at least after their first year. Even then with limited skills, competition will be rather tough. Once you're at least taking classes, I would keep a close eye on companies around the Bay Area for internships.

While you're in school, also apply for scholarships and cal grants. These things will really help you out. There are tons of people who qualify for cal grants, but never take the time to fill out the forms to get the money. If you keep your grades up, you'll qualify for more scholarships and there's a possibility of you paying your way through college using scholarships, cal grants, and anything you've earned from internships. It's a really optimistic plan, but it is possible.
 
  03 March 2010
enrollment in school is not a necessity for an internship from my experience. portfolio is.
you can build one if you are a good self learner.
for example:
http://motionographer.com/jobs/job/...hip-at-charlex/
go to the jobs section and search for internships. look at the requirements. maybe it will help you form your own opinion on the subject. everyone had a different experience.
__________________
www.neurobasics.com

 
  03 March 2010
Originally Posted by neurobasics: enrollment in school is not a necessity for an internship from my experience. portfolio is.
you can build one if you are a good self learner.
for example:
http://motionographer.com/jobs/job/...hip-at-charlex/
go to the jobs section and search for internships. look at the requirements. maybe it will help you form your own opinion on the subject. everyone had a different experience.


I know that here are internships out there that will take on those who are not students, but from what I know about the companies around the Bay Area (where he lives) they require you to be a student. If you know of any around his area, please post a link at least to help the guy out.

Lucasfilm:
Who is eligible to apply?

In order to apply you MUST be either an undergraduate junior or graduate student who will return to your academic studies upon completion of the internship. The internship is NOT open to recent graduates.

Pixar:
What are the qualifications to be considered for an internship?

If you are interested in a Technical Director Internship, you must be currently in college working towards your Bachelors, Masters or PhD Degree and returning to school following your internship at Pixar.

For all other internship opportunities you must be in or have completed at least your Junior year of college, be a graduate student, or have graduated the year the internship commences.

International students who are able to show work eligibility in the U.S. can apply. We do not provide internship opportunities for high school students.

DreamWorks Animation:
Want to get started? Then you:

-Are (or will be next semester) a junior or senior enrolled full-time at an accredited college or university.
-Have an academic major related to the position in which you’re interested.

Tippett and ImageMovers Digital doesn't have any internship requirements listed so you might be able to get one here even if you don't go to school, but they don't even have any internships listed so I can't say for sure that school isn't a requirement.

There are video game companies around here that have internships, but the big name ones also require you to be a student. I'm not sure about the smaller studios though.
 
  03 March 2010
Mate, seriously, if you can't afford it - don't do it. There is simply no point in going into heavy debt to get an education when you can go the self-taught route. Sure, self teaching requires discipline and dedication, but there is absolutely nothing stopping you but yourself. I honestly don't understand why people constantly push the "you must get a degree" thing onto people if they cannot afford education easily. Do you really want to end up drowning in debt when you could learn this stuff without going to a college? Think about it. Education is great for those that can comfortably afford it; to everyone else I'd suggest learning on your own. It is true that most studios only take interns from schools, but internships are not the only way to break into the industry. A good portfolio is just as effective.

And for what it's worth, I have no degrees. I originally come from a shitty third world country where there were no decent CG courses. I'm 99% self-taught, I started working in the field six months after opening a 3D package for the first time, and I've worked at some of the top studios in the visual effects industry since then. I'm not saying it's easy, but if you're dedicated enough and you really push yourself, you can do anything you want. And the best part is that I never had to deal with any debt from any massively over-priced courses. Although, funnily enough, I am now preparing to start a degree in a totally unrelated field simply for the hell of it. But I'm paying for it with cash upfront.
__________________
leighvanderbyl.com
 
Thread Closed share thread



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
CGSociety
Society of Digital Artists
www.cgsociety.org

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2006,
Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Minimize Ads
Forum Jump
Miscellaneous

All times are GMT. The time now is 10:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.