Pre Education

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Old 08 August 2009   #1
Pre Education

Hi everyone,

I am going to be a freshman in college this year. And my main goal is to become an animator. I plan on attending Ringling after this first year at a local school and I am wondering what are some things i can do on my own that will help me prepare.

What are some short and long term goals i should make as far as becoming an animator with in the next 5 years?
 
Old 08 August 2009   #2
life drawing
 
Old 08 August 2009   #3
draw walk cycles. I'm assuming by "animator" you mean 3D? If so, get a free modeling program (milkshape 3D is $30 USD, but it's an excellent program) to learn on.
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Old 08 August 2009   #4
Call Ringling admissions office and talk to them about what classes could transfer over.
 
Old 08 August 2009   #5
Originally Posted by Meloncov: Call Ringling admissions office and talk to them about what classes could transfer over.


good point. No sense in spending money on classes that won't count later.
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Old 08 August 2009   #6
i do a life drawing class once a week.

Is milkshape better than blender?

I already called Ringling about which classes would transfer.
 
Old 08 August 2009   #7
Firstly search the web and see what kind of animation you want to do. Sounds simple but almost nobody does it. If you had done a search you would have known the difference between blender and milkshape. Now I could do it for you but from what I know blender is a full app , animation, modelling, rendering and even a game engine. I thought milkshape was for modelling only mainly, but you look, you need to know. There are a zillion resources on the web,... look for them!

If it is character animation then check out the reels over at animentor.com so you can see what will be needed when you want to find work. Make a reel and put it on a website.

The more you know before you start your ed the more you will learn.

What are you waiting for GET GOING NOW!

Read this, it also applies to animation,.... its about getting off your arse

http://www.poopinmymouth.com/tutorial/money_mouth.htm
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Old 08 August 2009   #8
milkshape does meshing and animating, but not rendering. i don't do many renders, so I really have no use for that functionality at the moment.
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Old 08 August 2009   #9
I tried milkshape once, I yhought it was pretty good. You can always get a standalone render engine to do that part for you.
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Old 08 August 2009   #10
Milkshape? Blender? Seriously? I'd bet my backside hide Ringling is not using either of these softwares, and I daresay neither are too many production houses (maybe Leigh can chime in on how much usability they have in industry). More than likely you will be using Maya at Ringling or Animation Mentor, since they are both small feeders into Pixar (who uses Maya). Why not download the free version of Maya and get cracking on understanding the interface (Autodesk is kind of pushing Max into architecture and product design)? Other than that, I agree with those that mentioned life drawing and traditional hand drawn animation books and videos. The software is just a new pencil that uses the same rules, so up your traditional workload.
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Last edited by MrPositive : 08 August 2009 at 05:25 AM.
 
Old 08 August 2009   #11
Yeah,... the free version of Maya would be the way to go.
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Old 08 August 2009   #12
I already downloaded the 30day trial of maya and its almost up so i need something else to use when its over. I also have books on traditional animation which i use ( The Animation Survival Kit) and i have done a few walk cycles using rigs i found online.
 
Old 08 August 2009   #13
No actually screw it!
Not everybody wants to work at pixar,... I certainly wouldn't. I would be happier with guns a blazin and arms flying off all over the place. Stuff fluffy animals! That is why I said look at what sort of animation turns you on. There is film, games, advertising, web, engineering, architectural animation etc. Many game studios use Max for instance. True traditional art is the best (ever) foundation, but it can't hurt to get familiar with software. I say this because it takes a long time to get comfortable with 3d, far longer than it takes to switch software, which I guarantee you will have to do at some time or other. Take the principles with you, that's what counts. If you are good at what you do every company will give you a chance to get to know their pipeline.

I never understand why people are eager to accept that learning traditional art principles is most important, and that goes out the window when we speak of software, as if software is less, its 'principles are equally important.

Maya is good though
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Old 08 August 2009   #14
Originally Posted by yyates05: I already downloaded the 30day trial of maya and its almost up so i need something else to use when its over. I also have books on traditional animation which i use ( The Animation Survival Kit) and i have done a few walk cycles using rigs i found online.


Have you posted any of it for critique then? It's kind of hard to dissect what direction you should go from verbage.
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Old 08 August 2009   #15
well of course, maya is the industry standard. Any good school will teach you on that, and maybe even 3DS, but more likely maya. I was just saying milkshape is a good program, is all. :P

Originally Posted by Kanga: I never understand why people are eager to accept that learning traditional art principles is most important, and that goes out the window when we speak of software, as if software is less, its 'principles are equally important.


This is true. I've never taken any formal art classes (on something harder than elementary school, I mean. ) and I'm fairly proficient with graphics software and I can more easily mimic a human shape in 3D than in 2D. So here I agree. Still, there's something to be said for knowing how to animate in 2D. It certainly helps in 3D.
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Last edited by Rapsheba555 : 08 August 2009 at 03:28 AM.
 
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