CG animation schools to rich for my blood

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Old 03 March 2009   #31
there's also the online training options:

Video training which I use all the time, and is a very quick way to learn:

http://www.digitaltutors.com/digital_tutors/index.php
http://www.cg-academy.net/

and best of all, online classes where you can ask a lecturer questions if you get stuck:

http://www.fxphd.com/

and

http://www.escapestudios.com/en_GB/training.html
 
Old 03 March 2009   #32
Originally Posted by blenderhead: I am also dismayed that not a single post in this thread actually answers his question.



Maybe you missed a few of the posts that do actually try to help him? The ones in between my bickering about spelling :P

A lot of folks have been trying to say that he doesn't necessarily have to rely on schools to get the CG education he needs to succeed in the industry. And, more importantly, that the more money a school charges doesn't make it a better school.

There have been a ton of help comments already, and also comments asking us not to speak of grammar anymore! I can continue the discussion re PM if you wish, as I would still say more, but I think the whole argument is a bust anyways, as, like Jaco says, the OP has in fact stopped. :P

Anyhow, another question from myself, what happened to the stickied thread that had a link to a ton of schools? I know it still exists in the CGS Wiki (as I put it in there myself) but why is the sticky gone?
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Old 03 March 2009   #33
Ive learned alot from here
http://www.video-tutes.com/

it covers a variety of programs
 
Old 03 March 2009   #34
Hey Duhjin.

Here are my thoughts on the whole subject:

You can go very far on your own, especially at this day and age.
Most likely you will get farther on your own than any school will get you education wise. But getting your education in a school can offer you things that you probably wont be able to get on your own like, learning to work in a team, Structured learning curves and deadlines. You will also learn a lot from your peers, and working closely with them will definitely expose you to a lot more. You will also develop a network through school, whether it is with peers or school alumni. If your goal is to work at a major studio, more and more studios are requiring college degrees.
Dont judge a school by its price! Ask about successful alumni, and check out students work. Most schools will post their graduate's senior projects somewhere on the website. If you do choose to learn on your own, try to be as involved as possible with the forums and industry related communities, as that will become your main source of networking.

As for Geta - Although I agree that propper grammar is important, I think you have taken this a bit out of proportion. Yes, employers might be hanging out and reading these forums... but that doesnt change the fact that this is a casual place to freely express your ideas regarding anything industry related. I wear Jeans T-shirts and colorful sneakers to work every day... While some people would agree that my work outfit isnt a traditional one, I was never critisized for it nor taken not seriously at work for dressing the way that I feel comfortable dressing. Keep in mind that there are people of all trends and age groups on these forums and in this industry.

Duhjin, Skillz and a great attitude will get you far. Consider both paths, and go with the one you find most suitable for you. Be dedicated!

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Last edited by Wick3dParticle : 03 March 2009 at 06:44 PM.
 
Old 03 March 2009   #35
Originally Posted by Boone: Or how about you get off your own ass and do it yourself?

Go and get some books, dvds, software etc and just do it yourself. With The Animator's Survival Kit you have enough to get practicing with.

Get Blender, TrueSpace, Maya PLE, Houdini Apprentice, Messiah - or whatever - and go for it. True, you'll spend the first month or so trying to figure out the interface, but if you have a manual then its not exactly rocket science is it...

I know this is like a slap in the face, but the best thing for you right now is to just do it.

i would advise against that, with out seeking some form of help froma experienced person or a fellow newb to the industry.
maybe im just easily distracted, but if i could go back, theres alot of things i would change about how to learn 3d (first being would be to ban zbrush).
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Old 03 March 2009   #36
Originally Posted by Geta-Ve: And, more importantly, that the more money a school charges doesn't make it a better school.


Just look at Full Sail.
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Old 03 March 2009   #37
Originally Posted by mxdirector: i would advise against that, with out seeking some form of help froma experienced person or a fellow newb to the industry.
maybe im just easily distracted, but if i could go back, theres alot of things i would change about how to learn 3d (first being would be to ban zbrush).


If you ask me there are far too many people who want everything handed to them on a plate. Years ago, I was told "You've got it easy - software used to cost almost as much as a house, but now you only pay a few thousand...", yet now I'm the one saying "You people have it easy! I had to make do with half-decent cover-cd-mag software, but now you have access to many open source applications...".

Seriously, we have it good nowadays. For education in this field I would look to evening courses and fill in the rest for myself. It gets even better when you make the effort to hook up with pros for a drink...

Dont get me wrong, I'm not saying anyone paying out for an education is stupid or anything - but if that path is not open to them then there is another good option to fall back on. All it requires is hard graft and dedication...
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Last edited by Boone : 03 March 2009 at 11:12 PM.
 
Old 03 March 2009   #38
Originally Posted by mxdirector: i would advise against that, with out seeking some form of help froma experienced person or a fellow newb to the industry.
maybe im just easily distracted, but if i could go back, theres alot of things i would change about how to learn 3d (first being would be to ban zbrush).


That might be a little harsh, but it is important to learn the basics, even if you're a child prodigy you will always benefit from having the basics down pat. I know if you've learned bits of a program more or less on your own it sucks to have to sit through beginning tutorials, but I don't even know the number of times I've talked to somebody who was a total noob and still learned something from them. Then again, with apps like 3DS max you never actually know the application there's always little things that escape you. I would also tend to agree on the zbrush bit, sculpting is great fun, but until you know topology and anatomy you should be learning those.
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Old 03 March 2009   #39
IMO If you already have good drawing, color and composition skills, and feel semi talented as an artist, then you already have a head start.

I would have liked to have attend a C.G. school but supporting a family and going to C.G. school was out of my reach so I went it alone. I did go to Art school for my training though which taught me all of the art fundamentals (Color theory, Composition etc.). A lot of art schools will offer 3D training as one of their course and art colleges are quite often a lot more inexpensive than schools that specialize in 3D training.

Sure I wish I had more skills in a lot of areas but learning all the skills in 3D doesn't have to happen overnight.

All the best.
 
Old 03 March 2009   #40
Originally Posted by philnolan3d: Just look at Full Sail.


Lol, doesn't Dave School charge the same?

And I definitely agree that with all the types of training available in the form of DVD's or online classes, you can learn without going to a school or university. But I think it's important (as has also been mentioned) to go for other reasons. I went to a university for business before animation, so I had to take a variety of courses that are helpful for non-animation reasons, and the networking was huge too. I keep in contact with classmates from school and we have helped each other out once we got into the industry.

You can get in either way, it just may be a harder path depending on your personality, ambition, and dedication.

Good luck

Last edited by dax3d : 03 March 2009 at 01:48 AM.
 
Old 03 March 2009   #41
I've learned something important from this thread. Although i was expecting a good list of art schools that doesn't charge much.
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Old 03 March 2009   #42
Whether to be self-taught or school taught is probably a decision based on personality and financial feasibility. Some people love the school environment of having other students to share the learning journey with, and teachers available to answer questions, but a good school will cost you, and even some not so great schools will cost just as much. You need to pick the right school because there are some bad ones out there with faculty members that have no talent for teaching, are barely artists themselves (as in their portfolios will get rejected at just about any decent studio), and have no persuasive industry experience to speak of.

To learn on your own, you have to be able to sit down and go through learning material step-by-step and actually do the tutorials instead of just scanning through the lessons, and learn to be resourceful and use the internet as the free education it is. You can still have a community to grow with--forums like this one and others. Post your questions, post your works for critique, participate in discussions, join collaborative projects...etc.

As for myself, I'm self-taught, and perhaps because I'm self-taught I'm a lot more sensitive to issues regarding the efficiency of learning/teaching methods. I've taught art schools and one common thing I noticed is that an unmotivated and lazy person will be that way whether he's learning on his own or in a school environment, and a passionate and hardworking one will be that way no matter if he's teaching himself or in a school environment. The good artists are the good because they either work hard, work smart, or have talent. The really good artists would have a combination of two of those qualities. The amazing artists will have all three qualities. Being self-taught or school-taught has no bearing on any of it, although a really good teacher can point out what you're doing wrong and help guide you if you stray.
 
Old 03 March 2009   #43
Originally Posted by Boone: If you ask me there are far too many people who want everything handed to them on a plate. Years ago, I was told "You've got it easy - software used to cost almost as much as a house, but now you only pay a few thousand...", yet now I'm the one saying "You people have it easy! I had to make do with half-decent cover-cd-mag software, but now you have access to many open source applications...".

Seriously, we have it good nowadays. For education in this field I would look to evening courses and fill in the rest for myself. It gets even better when you make the effort to hook up with pros for a drink...

Dont get me wrong, I'm not saying anyone paying out for an education is stupid or anything - but if that path is not open to them then there is another good option to fall back on. All it requires is hard graft and dedication...


although they are major aspects of it all, i think one needs a few other things, goals and competition.
i simply dont want people to fall in to the same traps i did when self teaching. i think some one really needs specfific direction. if you could imagine a race with me in one track and some one studying 3d at college in another track. then he would be running in a stright line towards a goal. but i would be running 10 times faster but in every direction, i would literally be running circles around him.
if i had some form of direction i am confident i would be in the industry by now.

and competition is very important, expectionally if you are learning alone.working alone, you are comparing yourself to the very best in the field, its kind of depressing.
a bit of heatly competition is certainly a perk. i tried a few times but none of them went any where.

the bottom line is, that if i could go back a couple of years and change things, i would. i just would like to think that others dont go in to self teaching so blindly.
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Old 03 March 2009   #44
Originally Posted by mxdirector: although they are major aspects of it all, i think one needs a few other things, goals and competition.
i simply dont want people to fall in to the same traps i did when self teaching. i think some one really needs specfific direction. if you could imagine a race with me in one track and some one studying 3d at college in another track. then he would be running in a stright line towards a goal. but i would be running 10 times faster but in every direction, i would literally be running circles around him.
if i had some form of direction i am confident i would be in the industry by now.

and competition is very important, expectionally if you are learning alone.working alone, you are comparing yourself to the very best in the field, its kind of depressing.
a bit of heatly competition is certainly a perk. i tried a few times but none of them went any where.

the bottom line is, that if i could go back a couple of years and change things, i would. i just would like to think that others dont go in to self teaching so blindly.


You are correct regarding goals and competition. In art I am pretty much self-taught, yet since pitting myself against others in the HMCs my modelling skills have increased significantly with each challenge. Before the HMCs I would set my own targets such as spending at least one hour every night in Maya without fail, seeing a project through to completion by a certain date and so on...

As for guidance, I have said that getting in with professionals is important. Take every oppertunity to attend events, gatherings, a drink down the local and evening classes. Being self-taught does not mean locking yourself in your house and relying 100% on the internet; its about being resourceful with your time, money and what is around you. Being resourceful is after all a highly prized skill. For example, a friend of my family was a professional for creating Wedding videos. I scoffed at him at first, but not only did he introduce me to Macs, Final Cut Pro and some flashy high quality cameras - he also took me to an evening Master Class for Lightwave, which was presented by a very decent chap by the name of Andrew Bishop. At the time I didn't appreciate what my friend had done for me( I was a Maya user at the time, and felt falsely superior ) and I made the mistake of not attending further classes. And to think the classes didn't cost any more than a donation of a few quid at the door...
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Old 03 March 2009   #45
Originally Posted by Geta-Ve: I can tell you one thing. No one will want you if you continually think spelling skills with a zed (z) at the end is OK. It is NOT ok to be intentionally ignorant.

Guilty as charged

It is true though that whatever study you choose you are going to have to do the lion's share by yourself. Your aim should be how to create a terrific port folio. That isnt really something you can buy. Schooling can be great, self study can be great, but the next quote says it all.

Originally Posted by Lunatique: I've taught art schools and one common thing I noticed is that an unmotivated and lazy person will be that way whether he's learning on his own or in a school environment, and a passionate and hardworking one will be that way no matter if he's teaching himself or in a school environment.
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