Canada vs USA(3D animation)

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  02 February 2009
Canada vs USA(3D animation)

Hi, im a 18 year student and since 2months ago ive been wondering about my future and i cant make up my mind.


Im looking for a school for 3D animation and vissual effects, im aplying for EMILY CARR in vancouver, but my real goal is to go to VFS or GOBELINS.
The problem is that VFS is just a diploma and i want to have a bachelor documents, just for any situation that it would be helpfull, like if i want to teach, or if a job oportunity ask me for it.

If somebody can advice me i will apreciate it very much. I have 2 principal options:


EMILY CARR - Vancouver, CANADA

FULL SAIL - Florida, USA

What do you think about that schools?

And in terms of animation learning what would you choose: Canada or USA?

If you have any other suggested school please tell me.

Thanks
 
  02 February 2009
More important than the difference between countries is the difference between the schools. Full Sail is very technical, at the expense of creativity, while Emily Carr is very creatively focused, at the expense of technical skills.
 
  02 February 2009
I've yet to work with anyone that took 3d studies at Emily Carr.
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  02 February 2009
Yeah, I dont think their 3d reputation is very good, Emily Carr is very theory based courses.
You should explain what sort of person you are because if your the sort of person who learns on their own very easily then you might want to consider an academic education and dedicate your spare time to getting intimate with the more practical side of animation.

I know a lot of people go to vfs to learn the software and principles because they think their learning experience will be better than if they tried to learn themselves.
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  02 February 2009
Originally Posted by PorkpieSamurai: Yeah, I dont think their 3d reputation is very good, Emily Carr is very theory based courses.
You should explain what sort of person you are because if your the sort of person who learns on their own very easily then you might want to consider an academic education and dedicate your spare time to getting intimate with the more practical side of animation.

I know a lot of people go to vfs to learn the software and principles because they think their learning experience will be better than if they tried to learn themselves.


i agree with mister pork here.
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  02 February 2009
Emily Carr never had a good reputation in traditional art either. Someone once made a lamp out of a roadkill cat and handed it in for assignment.



Supposedly it had a good 2d animation program, but it was very anti-traditional art when I applied there in the 90s.

When you are interviewed for the school and one of the interviewing teachers says: our philosophy is that the student throw out all their existing work and start from scratch

and the other says: I dont understand why you ( a 22 year old male) are doing monsters and demons and dark stuff when my 5 year old daughter does faeries, and pixies and nice things

you dont get a good school vibe.

I did hear that EA had established some sort of partnership with them a few years ago though.
 
  02 February 2009
To reiterate what all the others say Emily Carr is a Fine Art School, it is not well suited to producing visual effects professionals. It is not a trades or technical college and that is not its mandate. Do not go there simply for the degree. If you want a career in visual effects VFS will do much better for you. As for you narrowing down your options to full sail or Emily Carr, try to think of it this way. You will be spending tens of thousands of dollars at these facilities and devoting a huge amount of time and attention to the programs they lay out for you. They will be the breeding ground for your first contacts in the industry and quit probably the links to breaking into the industry. I would strongly recognsider your options and go for the best institutions you can get into that are producing the most "hirable" studants. The money you are spending is an investment in your futur. I wouldn't narrow it down to certain schools just because they offer degrees.
 
  02 February 2009
Having attended Emily Carr myself, I can say its a great Fine Arts School, in a fantastic location. I cant speak for there 3d program, or its requirements, but Fine Arts at Emily Carr is not easy to get into without a substantial background in art, or some serious self taught skills.
 
  02 February 2009
I consider myself as a person who learns easily, and i really want to go to VFS the the problem is that, the certificate.. because y live in mexico and may be one day for any circunstance i will have to return and it will be very helpful to get a job.
 
  02 February 2009
How about Animation Mentor ?

Their student demo reels looked rather pleasing

Not sure what you'll get after graduating but they said 60% of their graduates are hired by the big companies, (faint memory from a video interview).
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  02 February 2009
Quote: I consider myself as a person who learns easily, and i really want to go to VFS the the problem is that, the certificate.. because y live in mexico and may be one day for any circunstance i will have to return and it will be very helpful to get a job.



In this industry its all about your portfolio and exeperience not the peice of paper that states what your degree is.
Oh also your reputation is vital!
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Last edited by PorkpieSamurai : 02 February 2009 at 06:28 AM.
 
  02 February 2009
Unless the interview teachers were imposters, Emily Carr did have a bias against traditional fine art skills, self taught or substantial background.
They tended to prefer "clever" art over technical skill.
They also changed their name 3 times in 25 years.

For a while they even stopped having portfolio requirements for entry and wanted students to make something specifically for admittance.

But they do have more competition now, so maybe they have recently been forced to abandon their bias against traditional art.
It was very hostile to it from the 80s-through mid 90s.

I knew someone who was expelled because he did a prosthetic makeup appliance for one assignment.

Last edited by kelgy : 02 February 2009 at 09:41 AM.
 
  02 February 2009
Personally I think you should look into The Ringling School in Florida, Art Academy University, CalArts, Savannah College of Art and Design those are the best schools in 3D/animation at the moment and they all offer degrees. BYU also has a burgeoning animation/3D program with alumni connections to Pixar execs. To a large extent, I think that any school that has an actual program and at least one or two good instructors will work for the talented and driven student though. My only issue with Goebelins would be the language barrier, the French are well known for not speaking any language other than French in their country so if you don't speak French fluently that would be a huge impediment to learning a very complicated set of skills.
 
  02 February 2009
Originally Posted by PorkpieSamurai: In this industry its all about your portfolio and exeperience not the peice of paper that states what your degree is.
Oh also your reputation is vital!

Not if he's an international applicant trying to work in the US someday. Indeed a degree shaves 12 years off work experience (as far as immegration are concerned).
Obviously everything else is true for landing that job and for the CGI company to want to sponser you. But unless you've been working 12 years they need you to have a degree to 'land you' as far as immegration are concerned.

Last edited by circusboy : 02 February 2009 at 08:37 PM.
 
  02 February 2009
I find Emily Carr students more rounded. They have better artistic eyes than the majority of VFS artists. VFS doesn't have art background requirements, they only require you to have the money. Only those who are already good in art accelerate in VFS. Plus, some companies in particular game companies with corporate background requires people to have bachelor degree to to move up to position like producers...which VFS doesn't require.
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