Wanting to go to DeVry University.

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  08 August 2007
Originally Posted by TerribleOne: Why is TV not research? I went online to see reviews of the schools, and DeVry had excellent reviews, and said their game design program is top notch. I've read many times in this forum "It doesn't matter what school you go to, it's what you put into it". If I put a lot of work into my education at DeVry than I can be just as good as someone graduating from Gnomon.


In five years, you'll look back on this comment, and either have a good laugh, or have a good cry.

I'm not going to bother repeating myself so I'll just say this: If you end up deciding to go to DeVry.

1. Set aside half the money you would have spent on DeVry tuition.
2. Use that money to buy Gnomon DVD's, Game Development books, etc...
3. Make a check for the other half of the money and mail it to me.

Why? Because if you go to DeVry, you're going to have to do step 2 anyways in order to do learn anything. Its going to frustrate the hell out of you when you arrive there and realize you already know more than the instructors (hint: If they really had worked at a gaming company or anything other than game testing (typically a minimum wage position), they wouldn't be teaching at DeVry afterward.)

Am I still not clear enough?
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Last edited by mummey : 02 February 2008 at 10:53 PM.
 
  08 August 2007
Here, I'm even going to help you do actual research as opposed to being sucked in to their half-assed PR on their website and TV ads.

List of schools in North America (from the CGWiki)
http://wiki.cgsociety.org/index.php...n/North_America

The Unofficial Truth of the Industry (also from the CGWiki)
http://wiki.cgsociety.org/index.php...ut_the_Industry
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  08 August 2007
Originally Posted by Babybell: From what i have read, having a degree for overseas jobs does help. Not to sure though. Where these people just starting out in the industry Celtic, or had they allready been working in the CG feild?


You skipped the rest of my quote, I also said "or relevant work experience" If you have a degree, you are more likely to be able to work overseas, but if you don't have a degree and have been working for 5-10 years, it's still an option.

That's just my focus, I really want to work around the world while i'm still young, so it's something i've looked into. Others don't care about working outside the US, so ignore that whole part of my post if you're one of those, just don't go to Devry, listen to what everyone is saying, teach yourself, do gnomon, do whatever you can, but don't waste the time or money or effort on poorly planned projects, bad teachers, and bald-faced lies about your chances of getting into the field.
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  08 August 2007
I went to a "cash grab" school and spent $16 000 on an education I basically could have given myself but I didn't have much choice in my province because it was the only course I thought I could get into with no prior experience.

The teacher ended up being poorly qualified, the one I got had never really done much animation and never even worked with MAYA! Looking back there were definite warning signs but hey I worked my butt off, got my reel finished and now i'm modestly in the industry.

Did I overspend? Maybe but I probably wouldn't have been able to start from scratch at home with just books. I think I needed that school atmosphere with assignments and deadlines to really cue me into how much work this industry demands. I met other people in the industry and got some connections and the school did help me get my first real job so they didn't totally rip me off.

What i'm trying to say is if you go to one of these schools you should probably expect to be on your own once they get that cheque.
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  08 August 2007
Okay so basically everyone is telling me DeVry sucks a lot. Man this is frustrating. My parents are really pushing me to go to college, so learning from books at home is not an option, even if it is a better education. They are really bugging me to the point of doing daily checks on my school search process. I really just wanted to relax and enjoy my Summer. I just graduated high school for christ sakes, what's the rush.

Ok so no DeVry. Are there any CG programs people can recommend in the Boston area. I really don't see many schools in Boston with digital art programs. Maybe I need to leave Boston and go to NYC.

Last edited by TerribleOne : 01 January 2008 at 06:05 AM.
 
  08 August 2007
Originally Posted by aesir: Any program that is called "game design" will suck.


If you want to be a programmer, find a computer science program somewhere.

If you want to be an artist, go to an art school.


Quoted for a second time, for emphasis.
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  08 August 2007
Hi there,

There is a higher concentration of good quality schools in the Boston area than practically anywhere else in the country, so to choose DeVry over a place like, say, Boston University to me seems like insanity. I would say to get a good broad education at a place like BU and to take foundational art classes like drawing and painting first so as to establish a good basis for your eventual 3D studies. If you look around the forums, you will see this advice given out a lot - don't rush the digital studies, because you really need a strong art foundation if you are intending to go into something like modeling, texturing, and the like - DeVry will not be able to offer you anything of this sort. Take your time and investigate schools. I know that Boston U. has a strong tradition of teaching traditional art - representational drawing, painting, sculpting - check it out, set up an appointment with a counselor, and see what they have to say. Oftentimes the process of applying to colleges can seem labyrinthine, but college is such a great part of life, and you don't want to waste it at a technical place like DeVry - if you think of it as DeVry Corporate Park, that's a little less appealing than the term "University", which it is not. A university is going to offer you a comprehensive educational as well as social experience. Living in a dorm is such a rite of passage, and you will have memories and friendships that may well last a lifetime. Check out at least 3 or 4 colleges in Boston if not more - back in the days when the dinosaurs roamed the earth, I think I applied to at least 7 colleges - it's well worth the investment to check out various places to determine which is the right for you. Believe me, a place like BU or another Boston based university is going to offer you tons more than a corporate outfit like DeVry.

Any school worth it's salt is not going to have to advertise, and particularly it won't patronize it's audience with the silly ads that DeVry has created for it's market of gullible teenagers who don't know enough to look further for a more quality education. I can't stress enough that you should go to a university with a strong computer science or art program instead.

Alternately, if you are not ready for the full on college experience, then you may want to enroll in a community college, which will be cheaper, and a way to figure out what you want to do for a year before applying to a university.

Good luck!
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Last edited by Rebeccak : 08 August 2007 at 05:04 PM.
 
  08 August 2007
DeVry are the same asshats that keep spamming my email acount, I had to make a filter to keep out all their emails.. I can't believe you're actually seriously thinking of going there... there's so many alternatives.. a good way I think would be to check out some of the graduation demo reels that you see from people here..

edit: ok, I just read your previous reply.. good, no DeVry
Don't be afraid to move across country just to go to a school or creative environment that you aspire to be part of. It seems Boston isn't bad (since I live on the other side of the planet, I just have to assume ), but it won't hurt to spread your wings a bit.
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Last edited by Renzsu : 08 August 2007 at 04:59 PM.
 
  08 August 2007
Oh, one other thing if you are interested in the art side of things is to check out National Portfolio Day:

http://www.npda.org/

They have a list of art schools on their website:

http://www.npda.org/colleges.html

Each of these schools listed sends a representative to their Portfolio Review days, where you take your portfolio to be reviewed by different schools:

http://www.npda.org/events.html

There's one being held in Boston in November:

Quote: Sunday, November 4
Boston, Massachusetts
12:00PM - 4:00PM

Massachusetts College of Art + Design
621 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
617-879-7000

admissions@massart.edu
www.massart.edu

Go! This is the cheapest and best way to get the skinny on different schools, pick up their catalogs, ask questions, etc. If you are good enough, some schools may accept you on the spot, but this is only if you have a top notch portfolio. I've seen some students offered scholarships if they were exceptionally talented.
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  08 August 2007
Originally Posted by TerribleOne: I've read many times in this forum "It doesn't matter what school you go to, it's what you put into it".


i don't know who is saying that; because it is completely wrong.

to a certain extent, school is what you put into it - but working hard won't guarantee success - you need to work smart. meaning, you have to have instructors who know what they are talking about, and can guide your education.

if your working hard but doing the wrong things, it doesn't matter how hard you work.

see the difference?
 
  08 August 2007
Originally Posted by TerribleOne: They are really bugging me to the point of doing daily checks on my school search process. I really just wanted to relax and enjoy my Summer. I just graduated high school for christ sakes, what's the rush.


BINGO!!, now we're getting somewhere with this.

Problem: "Parents pushing me night and day to get into college and get my ass out of the house."

Personal Advice: Grab a couple of classes at a community college. MAKE SURE they're classes that will transfer well to other schools; its a waste of your time to take basket-weaving or Phys Ed. at this point.

Tell your parents you decided to start at community college then transfer to another school for the degree. This will be mostly true.

While you're taking those couple of courses, either get your portfolio together to submit to art schools, or learn C++ if you want to become a game developer.

The community college courses are basically a way to buy time until you KNOW what you want to study and where you want to study it. You can't make a decision that will involve four years of your life in a week/month's time.

Ok, so in review.

Step 1. Enroll in Community college and take some classes you'd probably end up taking anyways if you go to a four-year school (Psychology, Anthropology, and/or Sociology are good candidates.) This is to buy time for...

Step 2. Build up a portfolio or learn C++ (whether you want to go art or technical.) If you want to do both. Pick one and worry about learning the other once you got a job in the industry.

Step 3. Use your newly found experience (as well as college transcript) to apply to the schools you know you REALLY want to go to, as opposed to the one's who you think will accept you as you are now.

Yep, it doesn't look as easy, and it looks like it will take a serious amount of your time and effort, but remember this:

Anything worth doing is neither easy nor fast.
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Last edited by mummey : 08 August 2007 at 09:24 PM.
 
  08 August 2007
Originally Posted by mummey: Anything worth doing is neither easy nor fast.

Agreed, most high school grads start looking for a school in Spring, not late August. Enroll in Community College and start planning the next step now. You are right about school is what you put into it, that includes the time and effort into researching schools.
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  08 August 2007
I would love to be a fly on the wall in a DeVry game design class. I bet they start by
with a history of the GUI interface.
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Last edited by Stevemoh : 08 August 2007 at 10:16 PM.
 
  08 August 2007
Anyone can buy a book on 3D and do the tutorials out of it, basically mimicking the structure of a 3D class. BUT the benefit of going to a school to learn 3D is the possibility of having great teachers. This can make all the difference in the world. Good teachers can give you real-world industry experience tips and help guide you to be a better artist by nurturing your weak points and building on your strong points. I know a good amount of people that work at respectable 3D studios/production houses and a lot of them also teach on the side to sort of give back to the community. I can GUARANTEE you that none of them would ever teach at DeVry...at least not now.

3D is the "hot new thing" which is why we keep seeing horrible 3D films like Barnyard. Everyone wants a piece of the pie and there is money to be made. Any non-art school who is offering a "brand new" 3D program is automatically suspect. If you're a school where 95% of your curriculum is non-art related (computer repair, etc.) then there's not a great chance you'll be able to get good teachers to come work for you. What you will get is the crappy community college or adult education type art teachers who will basically have you spend your hard earned dollars to do the same thing you could have gotten out of a book. My advice is that whether you go to a crappy art school or a good art school, chances are you'll still be paying out the ass, so you might as well choose the best one. VFS, Ringling, Academy of Art...it's worth looking into the "big ones" because often times they have the best teachers (depending on what discipline of 3D you're getting into.) But seriously, I'd stay away from DeVry if you can.

Good luck!
 
  08 August 2007
Originally Posted by blufftone: 3D is the "hot new thing" which is why we keep seeing horrible 3D films like Barnyard. Everyone wants a piece of the pie and there is money to be made.


While I don't disagree with the sentiment of your post, bashing a film is not the way to make the point. Alot (and i mean ALOT) of talented people worked on Barnyard, myself included, it wasn't a great film, but it by far was not the worst of the lot in the past few years.

Sorry for hijacking the thread, i just couldn't let that past. Like i said, I agree with his post, there are alot of people in CG (on the business end) who only see the profit. This leads to schools like Devry and sequels out the ass of every movie ever to be made.

You've got some good adice here (to OP) take it! And again, sorry for the brief hijack.
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