Need help Building 64bit Linux system - from scratch.

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  03 March 2014
Question Need help Building 64bit Linux system - from scratch.

Hi -

I have a branded comp (HP Duo core x64). I tried installing Win7 and it's not going to happen as there are no drivers from HP for Win7 let alone Vista - and no going back to XP.

I would like to get back to doing something while I look for another machine. So my thought is to turn it into a Linux machine.

I'm absolutely clueless when it comes to building a Linux machine. And getting more and more confused the more I look around as to which build to install or even try out.

A couple articles I ran into were:

http://www.blendernation.com/2012/0...-distributions/

And this one for anything when it comes to A/V creation:

http://www.dynebolic.org

And this one 50 Linux Builds - which is best for you

Seriously?! 50 distros...? Now I'm really confused...

I have a lot of questions but . I presume the best way to handle this is from the beginning and at the moment I would have to say that would be:

"Where do I start?" "And with which build for an A/V system?"
And where do you get drivers for Linux no matter the distro? HP doesn't have any, that's for sure.

I could use some help on this if you guys don't mind.

thnx
- chase -

Last edited by chasecanade : 03 March 2014 at 08:27 PM.
 
  03 March 2014
Make sure whatever programs you want to run will work on Linux. I've read Blender works well on Ubuntu, but it will run fine on the popular ones like Fefora/Red Hat.

Just download the ISO from:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

Burn the ISO to a DVD, plug in your blank HDD or SDD, and follow the instructions.

Ubuntu should be able to install the system drivers (ethernet, USB, ect..) automatically. It might also find and install your graphics driver for you.

Win7 should also be able to install the system drivers automatically from your HP just fine. Have you tried it?
__________________

Last edited by AJ1 : 03 March 2014 at 03:42 AM.
 
  03 March 2014
I've played with Ubuntu and thought it was a friendly OS. From what I've read its the most user friendly OS in terms of usability and apps. Back in the day I used FreeBSD and liked it. I'd use it now but I'm happy rocking with OS X.
 
  03 March 2014
HP is one of the few system builders that intentionally limit their OS support. It is not the rule but the exception. Don't expect to get any kind of support for a HP system outside of the explicitly declared list of supported items.
I have yet to encounter any current combination of PC components where you can't get Linux successfully to run. Driver support is very complete.
Like AJ pointed out, the important point is to make sure that the applications you want to use are supporting Linux. I would check which Linux distributions are recommended by the software manufacturer, chances are you will end up with Red Hat or Ubuntu, and use that.
Cheers
Björn
__________________
- www.bonkers.de -
The views expressed on this post are my personal opinions and do not represent the views of my employer.
 
  03 March 2014
Originally Posted by AJ1: Make sure whatever programs you want to run will work on Linux. I've read Blender works well on Ubuntu, but it will run fine on the popular ones like Fefora/Red Hat.

Just download the ISO from:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

Burn the ISO to a DVD, plug in your blank HDD or SDD, and follow the instructions.

Ubuntu should be able to install the system drivers (ethernet, USB, ect..) automatically. It might also find and install your graphics driver for you.

Win7 should also be able to install the system drivers automatically from your HP just fine. Have you tried it?


I downloaded Ubuntu 13.10 and installed it.

Did the steps illustrated on several sites on how to install Blender on it - did them and well
- nothing happens when I click the Blender app.

If you're supposed to be connected to the web when you use the terminal to do these steps - I'm not nor can I.

It also didn't do what they claimed it would do once the "archiver" or "extracter" or what ever they call it claimed it would do. Which is excract to the Home directory.

I had the Blender x64 linux archive on my desktop and that is where it extracted it. I moved the file under "Home" and still nothing.

Told you I was clueless when it came to Linux. lol
But! I will say this. My Audio worked again. The fans didn't run like crazy on boot up after installing Ubuntu, nor while in Ubuntu. Though boot up time was somewhat long I felt. Shut down is almost instant. Surprised me how quick it was.
- I had zero BSOD's so far. Which says a lot. No error messages from Ubuntu thus far.
Memory use after install was 2% while Win7 was holding at 16% - CPU was 1-2% while Win7 was holding at 3-4%.

It found my GC fine - though I have a Driver from NVidia for Linux I downloaded yesterday. DIdn't install it yet.

What it did not find was my new dual N wifi card.

And it wouldn't play any of my video's no matter what they were. Kept asking for codecs. or this or that... It said it had flash player but wouldn't play flv files. Again - codec not istalled. or Mims?

As for Win7 - it would install most drivers on it's own but - not the audio and wouldn't take the audio driver - I didn't expect it too. But it's reasoning was it wasn't a "signed driver." Win7 only excepts signed drivers.

But the big factor was BSOD's - I'd move a file it would Blue screen - any time CPU got around 50% or held for any length of time above 20% it would blue screen. And it would corrupt the files. Same Kernal exceptions all the time.

I kept WinXP running - but it would BSOD as well - not as much but the more intense the usage, better chance it would crash out.

I did all the memory tests and cpu tests and it always came out fine. Pulled every thing out - put it all back to reseat things - ran the tests again - every thing showed fine.

But nothing was as bad as when I put Win7.1 on it - it crashed right after install. and Like I said kept crashing when I was moving files - most were big files.

Linux ran last night for 3 hours with me playing around with it with out a hitch. Moved some big files 8 giggers or more - no crash. no error messages.

Not blaming Win7 - it's a HP - I've come to expect that from them. Their support as Srek mentioned totally sucks - their drivers are crap. But it's what I have so... I'm dealing with it the best I can.

I need a Win7 machine - no question. In order to run my apps, or open existing project files.

Linux seems to be the answer for this machine, (thus far)

I tried to go to the Ubunto forums - but you have to have Ubunto installed to register via SSO... or that One thing app I saw on it last night.

So asking them directly via their forum - is out.

Edit - i'm searching now for how to get blender to work - its not the only app I want to install - but figure I need to first get one to work.

Then I want to un-install all the games and Office stuff they have. And...

I found this web page 10 Things to do after Installing Ubuntu 13.10

Which one of the first things I saw was how to get proprietory codecs to work.
So I'm going to follow that - see what else it recommends.

Look around for what else can be installed A/V and 3D creation app wise.

I know there is Gimp for 2D - eh..?
Blender has a decent Video editor from what I heard. Been a while since I used Blender. Should be a fun thing to re-learn or keep me busy till while waiting for the Win 7 machine.

I did like the interface of ubuntu - it's kinda like a cross between a Mac and Win7 - kinda.
Takes a little getting used to with the close buttons on the left and not on the right.
And the shut down in the upper right corner not the bottome left. But graphics really seem to pop - maybe it's just me - but they look better for some reason. Sharper..?

Probably just me... and two weeks of frustrated down time just glad to see something on my screen again.

If you can think of what I did wrong installing blender - let me know. I'm not finding much in my search. No mention of whether or not your supposed to be online when doing the sudo - apt-get stuff in the terminal manager.

tia
- chase -

Last edited by chasecanade : 03 March 2014 at 06:13 PM.
 
  03 March 2014
Stop downloading things from websites. Linux uses repositories. Instead of getting Blender from the project website, get it from the Ubuntu repositories. This command will install Blender and any dependencies automatically. The "sudo" means do it as the root user, "apt-get" is a package manger, "install" is what you're asking apt-get to do, and "blender" is the name of the package.

sudo apt-get install blender


If you want you can install multiple things at once like this, not saying you need those specific packages just showing you can install more than one thing at a time.

sudo apt-get install blender vlc p7zip


If you want to know more about apt-get look at the manual for it. There's a manual page for every command on the system pretty much.

man apt-get


If you don't want to use the terminal there's a GUI for installing software from repositories called Ubuntu Software Center (like an app store sort of). Though I'd suggest getting familiar with the terminal if you plan to use Linux because it offers many benefits to power users.

If you want to install graphics drivers use the "Additional Drivers" utility which will install Nvidia or AMD graphics drivers in a clean way such that they can be removed or updated later. If you use the downloads from the websites they'll hose things and removing or updating the driver will be very difficult.

Shameless self plug - a training video series I made for Linux geared towards VFX and graphics workflows. Of course if you don't buy the video I'll still help you out!

https://cmivfx.com/store/480-Linux+...on+Environments
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  03 March 2014
Originally Posted by olson: Stop downloading things from websites. Linux uses repositories. Instead of getting Blender from the project website, get it from the Ubuntu repositories. This command will install Blender and any dependencies automatically....


Oh!

the instructions in the Blender wiki said to download Blender from the Blender site.
And the one I followed:

http://wiki.blender.org/index.php/D...x/Debian_Ubuntu

I'm not clear on what you mean - install from the repository..?

When I tried this - I got an error message on the first one:

Quote: 1. Open Terminal
2. Type in the following commands then hit Enter after each.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:irie/blender
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install blender


I just look up where to get Blender at the repository for Ubuntu and ran into this about it:

Quote: NOTE that the packages doesn’t include pre-compiled CUDA kernel. If you want to use the Cycles renderer with CUDA support, you have to install the CUDA toolkit on your system to do runtime compilation of the CUDA kernel:


And I found a bunch of announcements that Blender 2.69 PPA is ready for download for Ubuntu but where is this repository? and where are the down-loadable files? No one has links to them or this repository you and others mention.

The machine I have installed Ubuntu on - is off line. Has no internet access.
For me, I have to down load it - put it on USB - transfer the files to the HD when I get home.
Install.

Keep in mind - I know nothing about Linux.
I'm used to Windows - grab the file hit install - it installs and you open the app.

So now that Blender is on the computer - can it be installed? With out going to the repository as Blender suggests? Or is there a way to get these files from the repository with out having Linux installed?

I tried to get the codecs download for Ubuntu the web page I mentioned in my last post recommended and - no link. or it didn't work with my win browser. And that was on the Ubuntu site.

I'm trying get a grasp on it. I guess I really need to know if you have to be connected to get files or applications installed?

if so - then I'm wasting my time. I'm not dragging a tower workstation around. too heavey - too many parts - risk of breaking my monitors - and it's too bulky to fit in my laptop back pak.
 
  03 March 2014
Originally Posted by chasecanade: And I found a bunch of announcements that Blender 2.69 PPA is ready for download for Ubuntu but where is this repository? and where are the down-loadable files? No one has links to them or this repository you and others mention.


Ubuntu hosts user generated repositories called PPA (personal package archive). They function similarly to the official Ubuntu repositories but have no oversight from Canonical. The reason why the Blender wiki instructs users to go there is because it might be a newer version of Blender than what the official Ubuntu repositories have.

https://launchpad.net/~irie/+archive/blender

That's the page for the PPA, to add the PPA to the system the following command can be run. This does require an internet connection, as does anything else coming from a repository or PPA.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:irie/blender


Alternatively you can install packages that are manually downloaded (assuming they're for your version of Ubuntu). Directly downloading packages through the repositories is by far the recommended way to go for many reasons, but if that's not an option because there's no internet connection so be it. You can download the packages from that PPA below.

https://launchpad.net/~irie/+archive/blender/+packages

Note there might be other packages required as Linux uses shared libraries. In order for this to work you need to manually download all of the dependencies too (which a package manager like apt-get would handle for you automatically if you had an internet connection). From Ubuntu you can double click the packages and it'll bring up a dialog from the package manager, or you can install them with the terminal (don't remember the command off the top of my head though).
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  03 March 2014
Thanx for the explanation and the links olson.

I took a look at both of the pages you linked to for Blender and I have to say it's quite over whelming.

One page has 41 files and the other 43.

So from my point of view they made it a guessing game as to which are the right files let alone which are needed - for one app. yeah that gets a newb's heart pumping. Makes you feel all warm and tingly all over for Linux.

After seeing those pages, what I'm thinking right now is
- "One down, 49 Linux distro's to go."

That is unless they made all Linux Distro's this rediculous just to install an app?

IF they did, Then I'd be thinking
- "Could I make it in from 20 feet in one toss with my Hp to the dumpster, or should I play it safe at 10 feet?"
Hmmm? Decisions, decisions.

Last edited by chasecanade : 03 March 2014 at 12:09 AM.
 
  03 March 2014
Originally Posted by chasecanade: One page has 41 files and the other 43.

So from my point of view they made it a guessing game as to which are the right files let alone which are needed - for one app. yeah that gets a newb's heart pumping. Makes you feel all warm and tingly all over for Linux.

After seeing those pages, what I'm thinking right now is
- "One down, 49 Linux distro's to go."

That is unless they made all Linux Distro's this rediculous just to install an app?


Linux is not Windows. It does things differently. This is a shock to new users but once you get the hang of things you'll probably like it a lot better than the "Windows" way of doing things. Modern Linux distributions are very easy to setup and administer if you stop treating it like Windows.

Here's a list of some of the files from the links I posted for the PPA. What you're looking at is packages that contain Blender for five different versions of Ubuntu.

Quote: blender - 2.70+git201403131515.a349a3a-0irie1~trusty1
blender - 2.70+git201403131515.a349a3a-0irie1~saucy1
blender - 2.70+git201403131515.a349a3a-0irie1~quantal1
blender - 2.70+git201403131515.a349a3a-0irie1~precise1


The first part is the package name, then the version the version, the build date (unique to this PPA probably because there might be several minor releases of Blender 2.70), and then the end part is the version of Ubuntu the package is for. You can see all the names of the Ubuntu releases here (LTS denotes long term support).

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases

The other packages on the page like blender-codecs-ffmpeg2.0 are either dependencies or optional packages that expand the capabilities of Blender. I'd install the 64-bit version (assuming 64-bit hardware) of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS which is also called Precise Pangolin. Then download the packages for Blender with the "precise" name on the end. For what it's worth the correct release would be automatically selected by a package manager connected to the internet.

You might be asking, why is there a build for every version of Ubuntu? Since Linux uses shared libraries, those libraries are different versions for each release, and the compilers are always getting better with each release. This means that if you want the latest and greatest advancements for every release then you have a version for every release of the operating system. It's possible to use static libraries and include them with the application but it would waste a huge amount of space and bandwidth when there are dozens or hundreds of applications that share many libraries. A lot of commercial applications for Linux do this, but software in the open source ecosystem usually uses shared libraries.

While this seems like a huge pain in the ass, you're right, but it doesn't always have to be like that. Modern Linux distributions are meant to be connected to the internet. If you had been connected to the internet this would've taken less than a minute to install from a single command and you would've been on your way already. Also if you had an internet connection whenever new builds of Blender went up on the PPA it'd ask if you want to update it on your system too (single click to do so). If it were Windows you'd have to download another installer from a website which may or may not alert users of new updates, find it on the disk, click through a bunch of crap, update your desktop shortcuts, etc. That's a lot more work than a single click!
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  03 March 2014
Actually with windows it's a single click.

But I do understand and understood going into this that Linux was not like Windows or Mac.

After reading the install instructions they mentioned to make sure which file you downloaded - ie x32 or x64 and the version.

Seeing all the files listed - well -it's overwhelming. And none stated whether they were x32 or x64bit. That and normally I would not just install Blender from the blender site - but rather builds from Graphic All

Even with your explaination I do not understand which file to use. Which release of Ubuntu do I have...? I don't know - I just went to the Ubuntu site and downloaded 13.10. It didn't give a choice of 4 different releases. So how do I find out which I have and which file I need?

As mentioned Blender 2.70 is an upcoming release candidate - not an official release yet.

For me - trying to play it safe I'd choose 2.69.

I do have a good feeling about Linux on this machine. I knew patients was going to be a virtue especially being new at it.

The Terminal is just a cmd line window from what I can see.

I heard mention of a Black Screen of Death with cursor in 13.10. I have seen that on boot-up - it doesn't crash but does go black with cursor and I noticed something didn't load correct or there is an error line behind the desktop on boot up. Once the desktop is there I can't see it nor do I know how to reveal it. It's like Blender does with python cmd window behind it I take it.

I did find the error logs - nothing there for anything.

One other thing I did notice - was when in Terminal window - enter the sudo apt-get lines
it asks for a password and my keyboard would quit working - it wouldn't take the letter entries. Enter worked.
I'd do it a couple times and then it would work and I could type the password.
An error showed for the language pack - but it says its fine in the logs.

Now before I go downloading the five files and try installing them all -which I take it one should not do.

How do I determine which Ubuntu I have of the five?
 
  03 March 2014
Originally Posted by chasecanade: Even with your explaination I do not understand which file to use. Which release of Ubuntu do I have...? I don't know - I just went to the Ubuntu site and downloaded 13.10. It didn't give a choice of 4 different releases. So how do I find out which I have and which file I need?


If you downloaded and installed Ubuntu 13.10 then you have Saucy Salamander. That's not a LTS release, perfectly usable but know that supports ends for it in July. You'd want packages that end in "saucy" and you probably want the amd64 build unless it's a really old machine and you installed 32-bit Ubuntu.

Originally Posted by chasecanade: As mentioned Blender 2.70 is an upcoming release candidate - not an official release yet.

For me - trying to play it safe I'd choose 2.69.


If you want stable software just get it from the official Ubuntu repositories (Blender 2.66 is in the Ubuntu repositories). If you want the latest and greatest then that appears to be what the PPA is offering. Not sure if there's a build of Blender 2.69 in any official channels for Ubuntu 13.10 but there might be if you do some searching.

Originally Posted by chasecanade: I heard mention of a Black Screen of Death with cursor in 13.10. I have seen that on boot-up - it doesn't crash but does go black with cursor and I noticed something didn't load correct or there is an error line behind the desktop on boot up. Once the desktop is there I can't see it nor do I know how to reveal it. It's like Blender does with python cmd window behind it I take it.


I'm not sure what you're referring to, you might have better luck troubleshooting specific bugs on the Ubuntu forums. If it's a known bug you might consider using the LTS release instead. The non-LTS releases are more like release candidates for the LTS releases. Red Hat has a similar workflow where Fedora is the testing ground for stuff that eventually ends up in Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Originally Posted by chasecanade: One other thing I did notice - was when in Terminal window - enter the sudo apt-get lines
it asks for a password and my keyboard would quit working - it wouldn't take the letter entries. Enter worked.
I'd do it a couple times and then it would work and I could type the password.
An error showed for the language pack - but it says its fine in the logs.


The password prompt for sudo doesn't show the characters that are typed. This is so someone standing over your shoulder doesn't see the password, or even the length of the password. Same goes for the terminal login. Not sure what the language pack error was about, Ubuntu typically downloads language packs from the internet during the install. I'd suggest taking the machine to somewhere that has an internet connection, install all the crap you want, update everything, and then take it back to wherever to use without an internet connection. It'll save you a lot of headaches.
__________________
http://www.whenpicsfly.com
 
  03 March 2014
Originally Posted by olson: If you downloaded and installed Ubuntu 13.10 then you have Saucy Salamander. That's not a LTS release, perfectly usable but know that supports ends for it in July. You'd want packages that end in "saucy" and you probably want the amd64 build unless it's a really old machine and you installed 32-bit Ubuntu.


I found the release code name saucy when I did an internal cpu test - it was in there.

I don't know what an LTS release is to be honest. Nor did I know support for it ended in July. That is a bit of news...

Yes - as mentioned I have a 64 bit machine. (see title of thread)


Originally Posted by olson: If you want stable software just get it from the official Ubuntu repositories (Blender 2.66 is in the Ubuntu repositories). If you want the latest and greatest then that appears to be what the PPA is offering. Not sure if there's a build of Blender 2.69 in any official channels for Ubuntu 13.10 but there might be if you do some searching.


I thought the links given were the official repositories for Ubuntu...?
lol - this is seriously messed up...it's absurd. Really it is. The more it's explained the more confussing it gets and... absurd.
It is no wonder Linux never took hold. What a mess.
50 distro - and the first one I pick which is recomemded everywhere as a good starter distro and all have the same links to the same site - ends support in 3 months. And there are five distro's of Ubuntu alone...?
you can't just download the Linux version of the app and install it - you need special PPA - and I still don't know to install those once I get It downloaded.

From my point of view - having run some pretty big companies before - it's freaking absurd.
So absurd its just plain stupid.

100% discouraging for anyone even thinking about going Linux as an alternative.
I must be into self torture this week to continue on.


Originally Posted by olson: I'm not sure what you're referring to, you might have better luck troubleshooting specific bugs on the Ubuntu forums. If it's a known bug you might consider using the LTS release instead. The non-LTS releases are more like release candidates for the LTS releases. Red Hat has a similar workflow where Fedora is the testing ground for stuff that eventually ends up in Red Hat Enterprise Linux.


The Black screen of Death - was mentioned in the comments section of a thread that notifed of the 13.10 release and did a small review of it.

But if you search Google for Ubuntu Black Screen of Death - you'll see it mentioned quite frequently.

I found this video - but it deals with the Black Screen hang due to Intel GC. It may be the same reason mine does - but the Ubuntu GC Drivers installed from what I saw for my card.



It pretty much just hangs on a black screen with ony the cursor available.

As mentioned in a previous post - you can not access the Ubuntu forums with out a SSO or what ever it's called account anymore. Ubuntu One I think it's called?
- what ever chat program they use.

I would have gone and asked them but you can't even register with out using this chat program they have. My laptop is not a Linux machine. so that avenue is out.

Originally Posted by olson: The password prompt for sudo doesn't show the characters that are typed. This is so someone standing over your shoulder doesn't see the password, or even the length of the password. Same goes for the terminal login. Not sure what the language pack error was about, Ubuntu typically downloads language packs from the internet during the install. I'd suggest taking the machine to somewhere that has an internet connection, install all the crap you want, update everything, and then take it back to wherever to use without an internet connection. It'll save you a lot of headaches.


Once I type in sudo apt-get what ever - it asks for a password
Typing does nothing - no dots - nothing.
I hit enter a couple times till the keyboard works again and retype in sudo apt-get what ever and then it will allow the password to be typed in.

Which brings up another thing - it stated after install - "It seems language support was incomplete" so I hit update with the install disk in and that seems to have gone away now this second time around.

I did see what it was stating on boot up - it was "unhandled int 0000 something something."

I looked at the disks while playing around - I saw it partitioned the drive [ 250gig ] into three partitions. One was a really small partition 4-5 gigs maybe, while the other two were 255gigs each. I didn't ask it to partition anything when installing so I choose to delete one of the 255gig partions and it gave me 255gigs of free space.

Of course I didn't know that one of those two larger partions contained the root.

So I reinstalled - and now the "unhandled int 0000" doesn't show anymore. As well the drive is portioned differently - now it's one single 250gig drive and two smaller partions - 4-5 gigs each.

I'm seeing some bugginess in Ubuntu that many talked about now. I replaced the CMOS battery today and after that the boot screen has a bunch of white dots lined up in a pattern across the screen. Like 1 inch squares only a single white dot in each corner making up the squares.

Once I log in they go away.

And the system time and Ubuntu time won't sync - like Win does. There is either manual setting or - auto from online for the clock.

In Windows this makes a huge difference if the OS and the system aren't in sync time wise. I don't know how Linux is on this and don't want to guess at it either.

But if I'm going to use this for Audio and Video - the system clock has to sync up with the OS and Apps I would think. Okay I'm guessing - couldn't resist.

BTW - I just looked up on Google "official Ubuntu site" and this is what came up

http://www.ubuntu.com/download

So I don't know what official Ubuntu you are referring to. The download page there gives you the Desktop and the one I downloaded. 13.10 - 12 just doesn't have the extras from what I read.
As mentioned - That is the same site as all the links I've followed before downloading brought me too.

But with 5 different distro's as you pointed out - I haven't a clue which is official or not or if there is actually an official release of Linux any more. lol

And btw - thanks for the help and tips guys.

It would be nice to get something going with this computer.

Last edited by chasecanade : 03 March 2014 at 11:41 PM.
 
  03 March 2014
To answer some of my own questions I did stumble into some answers on the web.

It may help someone else as well trying to do the same.

For installing Blender or other apps from via say Blender or Graphics all or other apps as well which are archived I found this solution at AskUbuntu:

Quote: The first thing you need to do is extracting it in a folder, let's make it your desktop. You can extract an archive right clicking on it and choosing the appropriate entry. It should create a new folder with a similar name, e.g. program-1.2.3. Now you need to open your terminal and then go to that directory:

cd /home/yourusername/Desktop/program-1.2.3


Make sure you first read a file called INSTALL or INSTALL.txt or README. Check if there is any of these files with the ls command, and then display the right one with:

xdg-open INSTALL


The file will contain the right indications to go on with the compiling process. Usually the three "classical" steps are:

./configure
make
sudo make install



You may also need to install some dependencies, generally after some configure error which will tell you what you are missing. You can also use checkinstall instead of make install. See here https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CheckInstall


And these are the links that thread refers to:

Ubuntu - Check Install

and

Ubuntu Packages Search

And another quote from that thread:

Quote: Even if you have no Internet connection, you can still use Ubuntu's package management system, just download the .deb files from http://packages.ubuntu.com/ . Do not forget to download dependencies too.

For an easier way to install packages offline, see the question How can I install software offline? .


In further reading of the thread there is a lot of really usefull info on different ways to install including from source code etc etc.

here is the link the the thread so you can check it out.

http://askubuntu.com/questions/2596...or-tar-bz2-file

- chase -

Edit: The best thread to read is this one as it really goes into many ways to install packages/software offline. As well as making offline repositories and offline package management system such as "Cube" "which is available to Ubuntu, Linux Mint and other distributions that uses apt-get in installing."

it's found here:

How can I install software or packages without Internet [offline]

There is another good thread on installing software for Linux I found. A google search will pull it up.

Well that should take care of installing software.

Personally - I'm still going to look around at other distro's
I did like the one that showed it was 47% faster at render times than Win7 using blender - even though it is no longer supported - I'm sure there are others that are aimed toward A/V Creation and softwares for Linux.

Should keep me busy till I get a Win7 machine up and running.

Last edited by chasecanade : 03 March 2014 at 12:36 AM.
 
  03 March 2014
Originally Posted by chasecanade: I don't know what an LTS release is to be honest. Nor did I know support for it ended in July. That is a bit of news...


The full details are on their wiki.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LTS

Also when you click to download Ubuntu on the homepage it shows you this where it says how long each release is supported for.

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

Originally Posted by chasecanade: I thought the links given were the official repositories for Ubuntu...?


No, they were for the PPA with the latest builds. If you want the official repository that's at the link below.

http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=blender

Originally Posted by chasecanade: lol - this is seriously messed up...it's absurd. Really it is. The more it's explained the more confussing it gets and... absurd.
It is no wonder Linux never took hold. What a mess.
50 distro - and the first one I pick which is recomemded everywhere as a good starter distro and all have the same links to the same site - ends support in 3 months. And there are five distro's of Ubuntu alone...?
you can't just download the Linux version of the app and install it - you need special PPA - and I still don't know to install those once I get It downloaded.

From my point of view - having run some pretty big companies before - it's freaking absurd.
So absurd its just plain stupid.

100% discouraging for anyone even thinking about going Linux as an alternative.
I must be into self torture this week to continue on.


Get an internet connection. That's pretty much all I have to say on the matter. You're doing things ass backwards. Modern Linux distributions are meant to be connected to the internet. Then you wouldn't have to worry about most of the crap you're running into.

Originally Posted by chasecanade: The Black screen of Death - was mentioned in the comments section of a thread that notifed of the 13.10 release and did a small review of it.

But if you search Google for Ubuntu Black Screen of Death - you'll see it mentioned quite frequently.

I found this video - but it deals with the Black Screen hang due to Intel GC. It may be the same reason mine does - but the Ubuntu GC Drivers installed from what I saw for my card.


Sounds like it's something specific to Ubuntu 13.10, in that case use 12.04 LTS or wait for 14.04 LTS (next month).

Originally Posted by chasecanade: As mentioned in a previous post - you can not access the Ubuntu forums with out a SSO or what ever it's called account anymore. Ubuntu One I think it's called?
- what ever chat program they use.

I would have gone and asked them but you can't even register with out using this chat program they have. My laptop is not a Linux machine. so that avenue is out.


You signup on the Ubuntu website. It's no different than signing up for any other forum.

https://login.ubuntu.com/

Originally Posted by chasecanade: Once I type in sudo apt-get what ever - it asks for a password
Typing does nothing - no dots - nothing.
I hit enter a couple times till the keyboard works again and retype in sudo apt-get what ever and then it will allow the password to be typed in.


It doesn't show characters for password prompts in the terminal, see my previous post. I can assure you even though you can't see the characters being typed, it's working. Also the package manager won't do you any good without an internet connection.

Originally Posted by chasecanade: And the system time and Ubuntu time won't sync - like Win does. There is either manual setting or - auto from online for the clock.

In Windows this makes a huge difference if the OS and the system aren't in sync time wise. I don't know how Linux is on this and don't want to guess at it either.


Every operating system in the world uses GMT on the system clock and then adjusts to the time zone in software, except for Windows which assumes the system clock is set to local time (which is stupid for a lot of reasons, GMT on the system clock is the proper method). An internet connection would also fix this as it would sync with time servers when booting. Of course you can fix this manually if you want (in Windows). This is the registry edit for telling Windows to use GMT like it should have in the first place.

Quote: To fix it, just hit Start and type regedit.exe in the search box. Hit Enter and navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Contro l\TimeZoneInformation. Right click anywhere in the right pane and hit New > DWORD (32-bit) Value. Name it RealTimeIsUniversal, then double click on it and give it a value of 1.


That bit was from a Lifehacker article about the issue.

http://lifehacker.com/5742148/fix-w...oting-with-os-x

Originally Posted by chasecanade: But with 5 different distro's as you pointed out - I haven't a clue which is official or not or if there is actually an official release of Linux any more. lol


It takes time to learn these things. People forget they had to learn how to use Windows and Mac OS at some point too. Wikipedia is your best friend (so are forums!). Stick with it and you'll start to appreciate the differences and their benefits. If you simply want what you already know then go back to Windows XP or whatever, nobody is holding a gun to your head.

Hopefully you stick with it though. Linux opens a lot of doors for production techniques and career opportunities. There's a reason why every major studio uses Linux for practically everything (storage clusters, render farms, workstations).
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