advice about buying cgi hardware!

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  08 August 2013
Red face advice about buying cgi hardware!

Hay everyone, my name is liad
I am gonna start this year my 3d animation and vfx degree.
i need some advice regarding what is the best hardware to work with in this industry. i know i need a really strong computer. so i checked it out and i have several questions....
1) i heard that a strong computer for the 3d industry contains between 4 to 8 cores proccessor.
2) i heard the the more ghz memory it has the better it is.
3) i heard also about the 8,10,12m,etc.....proccessors speed i guess....
so i think my main question is that:
is there a preference to whice variable is more important?
the 8,10,12m speed, the number of cores or the ghz memory?

also, can someone explain to me what each of the variable means actually?

thx a lot..
 
  08 August 2013
There's a lot to consider that wouldn't be practical to explain all of in a forum post, that's what Wikipedia and Google are for. What is practical is giving hardware suggestions based on your budget and applications.

If you want a 30 second primer here it is, more processor cores are good, faster processor cores are good, more memory is good, faster memory is good, the priority of each is entirely dependent on what you plan to use the machine for. For example having a ton of processor cores doesn't matter if all you're doing is rigging characters for animation, but having a ton or processor cores does matter if you're rendering most of the time. So, what's the budget and what applications do you plan to use in school?
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  08 August 2013
Originally Posted by liad144: 1) i heard that a strong computer for the 3d industry contains between 4 to 8 cores proccessor.

I don't even know of an x86 CPU for sale right now that has less than 4 cores.
At this point in time and in the market it's like saying "a workstation contains a CPU". Yes, it does

Quote: 2) i heard the the more ghz memory it has the better it is.

Nope. That's incorrect.
For overclocking on AMD the frequency has some (minor) impact, on Intel even in an overclocking scenario it's proven to be irrelevant.
You buy ram of a frequency the CPU needs/likes, that's it.
For modern intel CPUs that's usually 1866, but a good 1600 will do too.


Quote: 3) i heard also about the 8,10,12m,etc.....proccessors speed i guess....
so i think my main question is that:
is there a preference to whice variable is more important?
the 8,10,12m speed, the number of cores or the ghz memory?

Hmm, afraid that doesn't make a lot of sense.
8 - 12M (CAPITAL M, it's important) is likely to be an indication of the size of the cache on board of that CPU.
It's probably the last detail you need to worry about, and has little to nothing to do with speed.
CPU speed is measured by many parameters (base clock, multiplier, boosted clock for single core operation, cores, virtual cores, auxiliary units etc.), which represent the best bang for buck is strictly dependent on what type of operation you run in what context.

Quote: also, can someone explain to me what each of the variable means actually?

You've listed the variables you really won't care about, but if you really want an explanation of them from a technology point of view you only have to go on wikipedia and read about RAM, frequency, and CPU cache.
You're likely to come out none the wiser for it though.
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  08 August 2013
i'll be totally honest with you about this.

"you are worried about the wrong things"

I understand your desire to be concerned with a computer, but just starting out.. it should be one of the last things to be concerned with.

As an example, after having not touched rendering or modeling software after 13 years.. i installed Maya 2012 on a system from 2006 (a pentium dual core) and was able to model and render just fine to get back up to speed on things.

You could essentially get a low powered, in-expensive system to start learning from and in two years when you've mastered your classes and increased your skills.. THEN start looking at a new system to take your work to the next level.

that's just my opinion though.
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  08 August 2013
When youre learning, a powerful machine is not needed. It can be nice but it really isnt required. Just grab a machine with 4 cpu cores as fast as you can afford, 16 gigabytes of ram and any geforce graphics card made in the past few years, it will work fine and have everything you need to learn. Save your money for buying a more powerful machine after you graduate if you need one.
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  08 August 2013
i7 with HT, 16GB of RAM, and some GTX460-560-660 should work quit fine!
no need for expensive dual socket xeon mobos and fancy quadros.
relax!
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  08 August 2013
Originally Posted by okmijun: i7 with HT, 16GB of RAM, and some GTX460-560-660 should work quit fine!
no need for expensive dual socket xeon mobos and fancy quadros.
relax!

There are plenty uses where even an i5 would be fine (IE: lots of poorly or non-concurrently threading parts, rigging/anim etc.).

A cheap Ivy Bridge i5 with a good mobo and a gtx 570 and 16GB of RAM these days are excellent bang for buck.
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  08 August 2013
^^^
I agree, but 100-200, +/- is not a worth of waiting of rendering time, in times of learning, just my 2cents...
Ofcourse, for modeling learning, i5 feats perfectly, for rendering and lighting I would go for i7, maybe even 2011/3930K or 4930K, if I could get that money...
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  08 August 2013
As I said it depends on what you do.
Yes, if you do anything that threads well enough then an HT capable CPU is worth the added cash.
Personally I have an i7 and for stretches of time I some times turn HT off as there's plenty of stuff I work on where hyper threading inflicts a small penalty rather than speed things up. That's of course not rendering
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  08 August 2013
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