Best way to format a drive for both Mac and PC?

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Old 03 March 2013   #1
Best way to format a drive for both Mac and PC?

Without the FAT32 4gb limit please.

Got a new hard drive that is Fat32 right now. It work on both mac and pc but I cannot copy big backup files. If I format it to NTFS, it might not work well on the mac.

??
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Old 03 March 2013   #2
try GPT format...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table
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Old 03 March 2013   #3
you could use NTFS and something like Tuxera NTFS:

http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/33122/tuxera-ntfs

or this:

http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/26288/ntfs

the free FUSE NTFS driver is outdated and unsupported I think.
 
Old 03 March 2013   #4
Originally Posted by tswalk: try GPT format...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table


GPT isn't a file system. It's just a partition layout scheme.
 
Old 03 March 2013   #5
I didnt think GPT was a format, its a replacement for the overall structure of the drive. ie. in the same way that a .AVI file can contain a divx or h264 codec, a GPT drive can contain an NTFS or HFS.

For cross platform drives it depends whats important. NTFS gives full read and write ability on windows and read-only on macs. Fat gives read and write across the board but as youve seen it has a 4 gig file limit. Personally I use HFS for full mac support, then I use one of the cheap 15 drivers on windows to read and write to the volume.
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Old 03 March 2013   #6
Damn, it feel slightly surreal that in 2013 there's still no commun format.

If I go with NTFS + Tuxedo on mac, is the extra software make the workflow more awkward (slower, taking cpu in the background...) or is it just install and forget it la driver?

thanks for the replies, very appreciated.
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Old 03 March 2013   #7
right... well, if he has the file system as FAT32, it's tables are probably MBR. So, restructure it has GPT. better compatibility and performance for large disks...

as for the file system, i'ld go with NTFS but like pointed out, you'll need something on the Mac to be able to write to it... not so sure how the security is handled on the Mac.
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Old 03 March 2013   #8
If you can access NTFS with a simple soft on OS X, why the hell it is not implemented in the OS? Pure stubbornness?
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Old 03 March 2013   #9
from my understanding, you can read NTFS natively on OSx but just not write... /shrug.

i'm not a mac guy, but thems what's written on the internets.
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Old 03 March 2013   #10
Originally Posted by tswalk: right... well, if he has the file system as FAT32, it's tables are probably MBR. So, restructure it has GPT. better compatibility and performance for large disks...

It doesn't really hold true.

If you buy a large enclosed drive (or any drive with reason to be pre-formatted), it will usually be GPT, regardless of FS. If it's less than 2 Tera and older than a year, it will probably be MBR, regardless of FS.

Neither is an issue on either platform, nor it matters much unless you need large partitions.
Allegedly GPT is less prone to corruption, but that's in cases that differ from home use.

For home use, unless you have a 3TB drive, you don't care, it's just the table to show the system the available mapping to partition.

Quote: as for the file system, i'ld go with NTFS but like pointed out, you'll need something on the Mac to be able to write to it... not so sure how the security is handled on the Mac.

exFAT will work in Lion/Mountain Lion and Vista and on, has no single file 4GB indexing limit, and to my knowledge (other MS having a patent pending on it) has no major drawbacks and is managed natively in both platforms.

Pre-Lion Mac formatted exFAT drives would usually not read in windows (the only surefire way was to use an external software in win I believe), but Lion addressed it.

I don't have a mac at home, but received multiple exFAT drives from my editor before and had no problems whatsoever using them, and handing him data back on them (and he uses Macs exclusively, whereas I use Linux and Windows exclusively).

Slightly trickier in Linux, but not an issue if you know your way around.

Absolute pain in the arse in more embedded systems (sharing a drive through a NAS or Router), as none of the embedded mini-unix running on those devices, or even the more complex ones (like Syn or QNap's NAS OS') have proper exFAT support. In those cases fat is usually more compatible.

Any reasons why nobody pointed out exFAT yet? NTFS wrapped is a pain in the arse.
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Old 03 March 2013   #11
maybe because it just wasn't adopted so well and microshaft has a death grip on it..?
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Old 03 March 2013   #12
Originally Posted by earwax69: If you can access NTFS with a simple soft on OS X, why the hell it is not implemented in the OS? Pure stubbornness?


Like someone else said, read support is built in but not write. NTFS is probably closed-source, so any implementation of write is a reversed-engineered hack, which would be too risky to add natively since MS doesn't have to document changes to the FS. just a guess.
 
Old 03 March 2013   #13
just a note that you should be careful about what you put on the NTFS system since file permissions, ACLs and Mac-specific things might not work correctly. Documents would be okay, probably, but avoid anything like applications, Mac Postscript fonts or system-specific items like that.
 
Old 03 March 2013   #14
What you're asking for is exFAT. A better solution in a studio environment would be to use a file server or NAS and let the workstations share data through that. Then the filesystem wouldn't matter to the clients because the data would be accessed through networking protocols (SMB, NFS, AFP, whatever).
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Old 03 March 2013   #15
Originally Posted by tswalk: maybe because it just wasn't adopted so well and microshaft has a death grip on it..?

Huh?
Sorry, but Lion, Mountain Lion, and any MS from vista and on supports it, and MS has an even tighter and fiercer grip on NTFS, while they are desperate to see exFAT picking up and loosened constraints considerably.
That makes it both MORE adopted AND not as tightly gripped by the balls.

In fact, take note of how NTFS isn't natively supported in macs, while exFAT is.

So, still don't see why NTFS is being recommended over exFAT other than oversight, or people not being aware of it being so convenient these days.
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