What to do as a (poor) cg beginner?

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  2 Weeks Ago
When your goal is the industry, then you have to use the industry tools. It's really this simple.
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  2 Weeks Ago
Originally Posted by Mari13: Okay, I'll try that! But some of the student versions say I have to be in college, and i'm not in one. Another worry of mine was how a lot of the student versions were non-commercial. While that's not a problem, I still need to be able to do commissions to get courses and even helping my current situation. What should I do? I still feel stuck. Thanks!
Non-commercial should be fine long enough for you to figure out if its truly what you want or not.
It is not very realistic to hope to get a lot of commissions while your are learning because really you are not likely to be that marketable.
There are thousands of people out there just like you. Unless you are quite the salesman there isn't a lot of reason for folks to seek you out in particular
until you are making outstanding work (which speaks for itself).

Also there are no 'learn-how-to-learn-CGI videos' out there. So you may find you'd learn better in a class room situation.
Industry Professional mentors are extremely rare and may cost more than a CGI school (by the hour).

Yes its cheapest to learn on your own. But also the hardest.
 
  2 Weeks Ago
Hi,

Wow lots of good instructions here. Funny comments too

It has become very sad as you need to pay a lot to use CG software Nowadays especially as 3D Artists, you tend to need at least 3 - 5 of these each at around 1k or more per year. Plus you need a high spec PC or Mac to run them which you need to update and buy new every few years.

So for newcomers it looks harder than ever.

To be honest I personally learnt everything on 'possibly' illegal software. Nowadays it's very hard and also the software prices are 'rental' - you pay per year or month - previously we could make one payment and use it forever. But I think you may be able to ly about ur college or write to them? Student versions I think have watermarks etc so they're just for learning not for commercial use.

Only Substance Painter with me is a permanent purchase ATM.

It is an insanely competitive industry / world and it's unlikely you'll get commissions while learning definitely don't rely on that - also chances are you'll start off as a modeller? There are millions of these guys out there and insanely dedicated, and in my opinion - it's oversaturated.

If I was to go back in time I'd say focus on Graphic Design at the very beginning and drawing skills - learn Adobe stuff - because if you can design logos and websites etc you're immediately making money. Then probably move onto 3D with Cinema 4D?

But ultimately I'm saddened that it seems if you're not wealthy or struggling - CG is not for you.

However all the best and good luck !!
 
  1 Week Ago
Originally Posted by circusboy: [table]Originally Posted byMari13:Okay, I'll try that! But some of the student versions say I have to be in college, and i'm not in one. Another worry of mine was how a lot of the student versions were non-commercial. While that's not a problem, I still need to be able to do commissions to get courses and even helping my current situation. What should I do? I still feel stuck. Thanks!Non-commercial should be fine long enough for you to figure out if its truly what you want or not.
It is not very realistic to hope to get a lot of commissions while your are learning because really you are not likely to be that marketable.
There are thousands of people out there just like you. Unless you are quite the salesman there isn't a lot of reason for folks to seek you out in particular
until you are making outstanding work (which speaks for itself).

Also there are no 'learn-how-to-learn-CGI videos' out there. So you may find you'd learn better in a class room situation.
Industry Professional mentors are extremely rare and may cost more than a CGI school (by the hour).

Yes its cheapest to learn on your own. But also the hardest.[/table]
I understand. I should probably try and tap into other things that I might be able to do for money while learning cg and saving up, then attempting to market myself once i've developed my skills to a certain point. Thank you circusboy! I'll try my best.
 
  1 Week Ago
Originally Posted by nicovangoed: Hi,

Wow lots of good instructions here. Funny comments too

It has become very sad as you need to pay a lot to use CG software Nowadays especially as 3D Artists, you tend to need at least 3 - 5 of these each at around 1k or more per year. Plus you need a high spec PC or Mac to run them which you need to update and buy new every few years.

So for newcomers it looks harder than ever.

To be honest I personally learnt everything on 'possibly' illegal software. Nowadays it's very hard and also the software prices are 'rental' - you pay per year or month - previously we could make one payment and use it forever. But I think you may be able to ly about ur college or write to them? Student versions I think have watermarks etc so they're just for learning not for commercial use.

Only Substance Painter with me is a permanent purchase ATM.

It is an insanely competitive industry / world and it's unlikely you'll get commissions while learning definitely don't rely on that - also chances are you'll start off as a modeller? There are millions of these guys out there and insanely dedicated, and in my opinion - it's oversaturated.

If I was to go back in time I'd say focus on Graphic Design at the very beginning and drawing skills - learn Adobe stuff - because if you can design logos and websites etc you're immediately making money. Then probably move onto 3D with Cinema 4D?

But ultimately I'm saddened that it seems if you're not wealthy or struggling - CG is not for you.

However all the best and good luck !!
Hi! I've been thinking about doing vector art and graphic design to do money, but the field seems so intimidating. Even on fiverr you see so many people pitted against each other, being able to make logos in 24 hours, unlimited revisions, i'm just not sure what i'd do to be able to stand out or even just be on the same playing field with so many people, especially as I am still learning with Inkscape and hope to maybe get affinity designer after i'm able to do commissions- it's just a loop. I'm not sure what to do. What would you suggest? At this point, I think i'm just going to have to find a second job somehow and find a way to manage. Thank you!
 
  1 Week Ago
Originally Posted by Array: 1) Stop using Blender. It's not going to do you any favors in regards to getting an industry job unless it's at one of a very small handful of indie game studios which make use of it.

2) Get an indie or educational version of a piece of software like Maya or Houdini. Not only will learning one of those will make you more employable, but the tutorials/training available for them can be quite good.

Also, what is it specifically that you are trying to create with your projects, and what is it that you are getting stuck on?

Finally, to answer your question about how I got to my current level, I started using 3d software in my early teens without any real guidance. This was well before forums like CGTalk, let alone YouTube, existed. My only real guidance at the time were books which in retrospect were written by people who also did not know what they were doing. I eventually went to university to study computer science, though in a program which heavily emphasized computer graphics. Even while in this program I continued to work on personal projects and self study. Following graduation I had a job which was pure programming. While at this job I continued to work on my graphics skills and portfolio and did not get my first 'industry' job until a few years later. I'm currently working on my 11th feature film credit.
I'm so sorry for the late reply! Everything had piled up recently. What i've generally wanted to do with cg has been to worldbuild in a way, I started trying to learn cg after watching some movies made with cg and wanted to create things and stories, like a barbie playhouse. Characters, vehicles, food for them to eat, homes.. That and animation, and even still renders with stories in them. Sorry if I sound silly or incoherent. One thing I often get stuck on is texturing and retopology, and rendering and animation, the whole process has been difficult in trying to figure out a professional way without shelling out money for courses, etc. Also, generally finding the time to create that many things? I know that by myself I won't be able to create a city, but even scenes like a coffee shop can take months from several knowledge setbacks.

I'll try my best to find a way to apply for a educational license for maya or houdini, but also, what should I do once the trial expires? I'll try my best to create things that can be applied to a portfolio and see if I do get in a gig somewhere, but what if I don't? What if rather I can only freelance? I don't know if i'll have the money to pay for the software/subscription by myself. Do I accept a lot of commissions and then get the software and start them? Sorry if I sound silly. I'll try my best to hone other skills and get money from other things too, and see whether I can save up moneyfrom that as well. Thank you so much Array for your advice!
 
  1 Week Ago
Seems like you are asking a lot of yourself.
Most of your examples are done by entire studios (50-250 people +). Not individuals.
Its not impossible for a generalist to 'do-it-all' but you could easily find there is a stage your are not good at-say 'rigging' for example- that roadblocks you from animation.
There you are -show stopper. Very hard to 'self-teach yourself an *entire animation pipeline*. I expect it to take your years to lean let alone produce.
Here is a great example what a pipeline is according to Pixar:
http://pellacini.di.uniroma1.it/tea...01_pipeline.pdf

No wonder you are hitting things you can't finish.

Also a one-person-character animation studio is going to have *way slower* turnaround times-like maybe years- compared to months at a full animation studio
and that is just for an animation short that is well crafted.
Most of these things are calculated in man hours.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man-hour
The examples listed here are more ambitious than yours-but still-its daunting.
https://www.quora.com/How-many-man-...th-feature-film
Because even simplified its gotta be a lot of work or it will appear
like *complete crap* that your really won't convince anyone to pay for.

So it may not be practical for you to be considering being a one-man-animation studio.
And no wonder you have a hard time finishing anything.
Maybe you need to investigate something where a lot of the assets are done for you.
https://www.daz3d.com/

So maybe don't sabotage your chances at learning 'anything' by trying to learn *everything* at once on your own.
 
  1 Week Ago
If you want to build entire worlds yourself and make high quality assets all by yourself you're probably going to have to little time on your hands to accomplish it.
When i started out i wanted to make my own game, all by myself, while there have been major advances in game engines that help out a lot in getting more done in a shorter amount of time, the workload for 1 man is still daunting, pretty much undoable.

I'd suggest you start finishing some models first, you said you hardly ever finish you models, that's not a good thing for morale, cause in the end you have nothing.
Just finish your work and when doing that you'll discover in what you're good at, you already know where some of your problems are, like you said, retopology and texturing, so read up on that to be able to finish your work..

Once you know what things you like to make and what things you're good at, you can decide in what direction you are going.
think logical to be able to solve your problems, there are a lot of forums where you can ask your problems.
I usually google some good keywords when i get stuck and after some reading i get a general idea on how to solve my problem.
And slowly you get better and better, it just takes a while before you are good enough to be able to earn some money with it, it took me approximately 7 years before i could sell my assets on the Unity store.

And yeah, ditch Blender, it's very user unfriendly.
Get Maya or 3DSMax student to learn, i'd suggest Maya if you want to just make assets and sell them, but 3DSMax if you want to go work for a gamestudio later on.

Best of luck to you, and Google is your best friend, just google if you get stuck to find new ideas and workaround, tons of tutorials on the net.
 
  1 Week Ago
Originally Posted by Mari13: Hi! I've been thinking about doing vector art and graphic design to do money, but the field seems so intimidating. Even on fiverr you see so many people pitted against each other, being able to make logos in 24 hours, unlimited revisions, i'm just not sure what i'd do to be able to stand out or even just be on the same playing field with so many people, especially as I am still learning with Inkscape and hope to maybe get affinity designer after i'm able to do commissions- it's just a loop. I'm not sure what to do. What would you suggest? At this point, I think i'm just going to have to find a second job somehow and find a way to manage. Thank you!

I was a professional Print Graphic Designer for 20 years before getting into 3D/CG.
Given The current state of the freelance 2D graphic design market
I would assert that trying to make a full time living creating Logos and flyers etc,
is a recipe for literal suicide by starvation.

It is 100 percent a buyers Market where you will be competing globally with people using perfabbed templates
and willing to create & deliver for incredibly low fees.

you are also competing aginst online print on demand sites that have built in online templates where
the buyer can pick from prefabbed templates and plugin in his text and have the finshed product delivered in 24 hours.

Having said that there is one fellow ,on these forums,
( Ilovekaiju)??, who claims he made over $100,000 USD on Fivre last year while sleeping in to
10 am every day so perhaps he can share his business model with you.

As far as becoming a one man Animation studio
this is technicaly possible as I am Essentially a one man operation using Daz prefab content for
Characters and Iclone Pro for quick easy motionbuilding/retargeting.

however I am rendering in Old NON sub based versions of
Software Like C4D R 11.5
using Old non cloud version of Adobe CS3 and after Effects CS3.

You however will only have the newer subscription based software that you obviously cannot afford .
So my advice is try to fob a student version of the Autodesk products or get the houdini apprentice version
and learn while working a proper job in hospitality /Food service.

Or forget about this CG/3D as career and learn to write code
particularly in the areas of institutional financial systems software
or PCI control systems for the medical industry.
 
  5 Days Ago
Hi, Is not bad using blender but learnning a standart industry software you will improve your chances. I think you need to study the fundamentals of desing, look at "Creative Illustration" by loomis (there is a pdf online)or any book about desing, color and form like alex white "The elements of graphics design". Becouse to learn a software is trail and error or youtube, it's my humble opinion.
 
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