Would it be "cheating" to use 3D models for 2D art?

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  4 Weeks Ago
Would it be "cheating" to use 3D models for 2D art?

I mostly draw 2D art without any sort of 3D models as a base, though I sometimes use one to try and help myself practice. One of the main issues I've had is drawing objects, especially while dealing with perspective, and was wondering if it would be considered "cheating" or whatever if I were to use 3D models to help me out occasionally by tracing them (whether partially or fully), just for a little while as I try to get the hang of it. I'm also curious about whether or not it would make this be/feel/look less like "cheating" if I were to use my own 3D models, assuming I ever get into making them at all.
 
  4 Weeks Ago
It's basically like this:

For professional work, no one gives a damn what your workflow is, as long as you don't break any copyright laws, such as copying someone else's artwork/photo or putting significant parts of them into your own artwork so they're recognizable by the original creator.

For personal work, if the only way you can achieve the result you want is by "cheating," then in your own mind, it IS cheating, as you feel insecure as an artist, knowing you can't draw/paint proficiently without using 3D and tracing as a crutch. But if your work is supposed to be a hybrid approach that combines 2D and 3D and you don't have a purist attitude about how art is supposed to be created, then it doesn't matter--as long as you don't mislead people and lie about your process, claiming you drew/painted everything by hand and out of your head.
 
  4 Weeks Ago
Should it still feel like cheating in personal work if I were to use a model just to make it a bit faster for whatever reason?
For example, I want to draw a special sword. I know I would be able to draw the sword without any assistance, but tracing a model I would make for it will end up being quicker, even if not by much.
 
  4 Weeks Ago
That kind of thing is similar to using a ruler to draw a straight line. For the perspective stuff, it might be more difficult now but if you use 3D models and you can do a good job that way then probably over time you will be more easily able to do it without them simply from having a lot of practice drawing perspective
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  4 Weeks Ago
Originally Posted by UpbeatChimera: Should it still feel like cheating in personal work if I were to use a model just to make it a bit faster for whatever reason?
For example, I want to draw a special sword. I know I would be able to draw the sword without any assistance, but tracing a model I would make for it will end up being quicker, even if not by much.

Only you can decide if you feel like a cheater. Digital art is all about using clever workflow that's not available in traditional art, so I personally don't think it's cheating. It's the end result that matters. As long as you aren't lying about your methods and misleading people, no one really cares (except for some purists who condemn anything but purely hand-drawn/painted from scratch).

There are digital artists whose workflow utilizes photo-bashing and 3D elements and tracing, and they manage to have successful careers. The purists might not be fans of their work, but it's a matter of taste and personal artistic priority. In the commercial world, no one really cares--whatever gets results faster and won't cause legal problems is fine.
 
  4 Weeks Ago
Whatever makes you faster and whatever makes you get the desired result.

Have you ever seen Brian Haberlin's work. He used to draw Spawn and other folks comics. Now he is working on his own comic and he uses Poser as a shortcut.
So did the guy who did GANTZ which has spawned a ton of manga, 2 movies, an anime series and a 3d movie.

Yeah dude it really doesn't matter as long as you are happy with the result and you don't copy someones work.
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  4 Weeks Ago
Why would drawing over a 3D model be "cheating" at all?

The more varied your techniques and workflows are, the more situations you'll be able to cope with as an artist.

If I were producing 2D art, I'd probably do exactly the same - model some stuff in 3D, render it with cell-shading and then paint over it.

Why wouldn't you? Why does it matter whether you drew something by hand, or created a 3D reference to draw or paint over?
 
  4 Weeks Ago
Originally Posted by skeebertus: Why would drawing over a 3D model be "cheating" at all?

The more varied your techniques and workflows are, the more situations you'll be able to cope with as an artist.

If I were producing 2D art, I'd probably do exactly the same - model some stuff in 3D, render it with cell-shading and then paint over it.

Why wouldn't you? Why does it matter whether you drew something by hand, or created a 3D reference to draw or paint over?

A while back some people I used to be close with viewed it negatively, so back then I tried to avoid it so I wouldn't be labeled as "someone who can't do art at all without 3D models" thanks to the negative sound of it. The current models I do occasionally use were made by other people, but I don't claim them as my own and they're fairly generic ones (I wouldn't use, say, a detailed model of a specific character meant for a game or animated show).
 
  4 Weeks Ago
I don't think it matters that much. I find for personal work a lot of artists have varying techniques to get final result. Now if you are trying to teach yourself, and use a major short cut that negates some of that practice then you are doing yourself a disservice. I wouldn't call anything cheating though.
 
  4 Weeks Ago
I think using 3D it just a good way to have as reference haha

So the perspective is in any way correct. See it as drawing rulers.
 
  4 Weeks Ago
I guess it would depend on how you characterize your art:

If you characterize it as simply high quality 2D art, then there should be no problem. That characterization is both truthful and meaningful. How you achieve that quality 2D art is entirely up to you. It should be noted that it takes artistic skill to produce the 3D art that would then be translated into 2D art. By the same token, 3D art often requires quality 2D skills (e.g., texturing). Art, be it 2D or 3D, is an expression of the artist, and gains it quality in how effectively the expression is conveyed. The skill is in the artistic expression more so than the medium of its creation.

If, on the other hand, you characterize your 2D art (which was created in 3D) as being indicative of your drawing skills, then your being dishonest and would be cheating.

Last edited by JabbaTheNut : 4 Weeks Ago at 05:04 PM.
 
  4 Weeks Ago
Originally Posted by ilovekaiju: Whatever makes you faster and whatever makes you get the desired result.

Have you ever seen Brian Haberlin's work. He used to draw Spawn and other folks comics. Now he is working on his own comic and he uses Poser as a shortcut.
So did the guy who did GANTZ which has spawned a ton of manga, 2 movies, an anime series and a 3d movie.


And Poser was initially created to replace the artist's mannequin, a long accepted way to learn proportion and perspective when drawing the human form. It might be cheating, but what is wrong with cheating? I imagine every comic artist and cartoonist has at some point posed an action figure or held a model car at a certain angle to compose an image. Even DaVinci had people to pose for him.
 
  4 Weeks Ago
Originally Posted by UpbeatChimera: A while back some people I used to be close with viewed it negatively, so back then I tried to avoid it so I wouldn't be labeled as "someone who can't do art at all without 3D models" thanks to the negative sound of it. The current models I do occasionally use were made by other people, but I don't claim them as my own and they're fairly generic ones (I wouldn't use, say, a detailed model of a specific character meant for a game or animated show).


Do not listen to "art purists" on digital art workflow matters ever. I have seen so many idiotic "rules of creating true art" espoused on various online forums.

Each time it is someone with their head up their ass who can do something particular very well - such as drawing perfectly without reference - and then telling everyone else "THAT is the way it is done".

None of the 18th/19th/20th Century art rules apply in this Century. We have moderately capable 3D tools now, and we can use them however we want.

You know the software Poser? (Now DAZ Studio) That started as a simple 3D tool for posing an anatomically sound 3D character in various poses so people could draw better 2D character from it. It became quite popular quite quickly.

If you have 3D tools, there is no rule whatsoever that you cannot use them to create 2D art.

There is also plenty of great digital 2D art out there that was almost certainly done this way - 3D modeled and rendered to some extent, and then traced or painted over.

As long as people look at your art and go "that looks fantastic", you can freely chose your workflow for achieving that effect.

The only real iron rule that does make sense in creating art is that you shouldn't copy or plagiarize other people's art.
 
  4 Weeks Ago
Originally Posted by skeebertus: The only real iron rule that does make sense in creating art is that you shouldn't copy or plagiarize other people's art.
And there is the rub.
Is the OP modeling everything in 3d themselves and then drawing over them?
Or simply drawing over misc 3d models found around the internet -which if they are very new to CG could well be the case.
The latter is fine for personal use as long as the source for the 3d models has no objection...

Meanwhile always I thought doing the opposite of the OPs question had a lot of whimsy...
https://www.boredpanda.com/kid-draw...have-drawn-dom/
 
  4 Weeks Ago
Originally Posted by skeebertus:
You know the software Poser? (Now DAZ Studio) That started as a simple 3D tool for posing an anatomically sound 3D character in various poses so people could draw better 2D character from it. It became quite popular quite quickly.
To clarify, Daz Studio is a Poser-like program developed by and distributed by Daz3D. Poser, originally developed by Fractal Design, is currently owned and sold by Smith Micro.

Last edited by moogaloonie : 4 Weeks Ago at 12:15 AM.
 
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