New Form of Painting or just VFX in a frame?

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Old 10 October 2013   #1
New Form of Painting or just VFX in a frame?

So I came across today on the BBC, 2 videos on how old paintings are recreated with CG and are displayed with an apple imac screen with a frame around it. The paints are 3D animations, with the subject textured to appear as though they are paintings.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-24579564
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-24579567

So is this a new from of art?

Also just want to say great work on the paintings MPC.
 
Old 10 October 2013   #2
Originally Posted by Darkherow:
So is this a new from of art?


No, this is called a "gimmick."

It's kinda cool (if also kind of gross) from a digital image perspective, but it's just a modern art installation. We're well past the age of there being any "new form of art" since anything that someone wants to call "art" can now be called "art." I'm calling the exclamation at the end of this sentence "art," so there!
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Old 10 October 2013   #3
Not only that, but "certificate of authenticity"... It's hard to imagine how they could uphold such a placecard. Reminds me of the Warhol heritage foundation dictating their originals and not rip-offs; saying "this is a real piece, however, this is not."
 
Old 10 October 2013   #4
Originally Posted by Narntson: Not only that, but "certificate of authenticity"... It's hard to imagine how they could uphold such a placecard.


Not only that, but what about file formats? What happens when that Mac no longer runs that version of the animation? Anyone who has any .flc files lying around will know what I mean.
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Old 10 October 2013   #5
Also I think the end result reminds me of a 'screensaver'.
 
Old 10 October 2013   #6
Originally Posted by Artbot: Not only that, but what about file formats? What happens when that Mac no longer runs that version of the animation? Anyone who has any .flc files lying around will know what I mean.


They don't go into any details, but at the end of the video clip they acknowledge the potential difficulties and say that they have a preservation plan in place. Digital art is a pretty small corner of the fine arts world, but it's still substantial enough that there are conservators who specialize in the associated issues.
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Old 10 October 2013   #7
In a similar vein (CG technology meets existing fine art) but perhaps at the other end of the spectrum (producing solid replicas rather than digital files and certainly not a new artform) is the Fuji technique for 3D printing fine art replicas.
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Old 10 October 2013   #8
I think i will take a couple of spheres rendered for shader testing, project them onto a tft screen untill it burns in and sell it as a high brow art piece. I think the sphere could be the conceptual essence of a macro universe in a ever changing and expanding cosmos, the tft screen represents our plastic existence and love of material gain, and mix it all in with some splashes of paint to represent the chaos, chaos of too much overtime.

Anyone think i could send it out to Tate modern?
 
Old 10 October 2013   #9
Originally Posted by Meloncov: They don't go into any details, but at the end of the video clip they acknowledge the potential difficulties and say that they have a preservation plan in place. Digital art is a pretty small corner of the fine arts world, but it's still substantial enough that there are conservators who specialize in the associated issues.


But as circusboy said, this is nothing more than a screensaver. You can make your own with a $50 digital frame. As for the "conservators," I'm highly skeptical that there's a group of people or a foundation that will validate and update this piece in perpetuity. A piece like this has only the value we assign to it, which honestly can be said about most works of "art." I'd guess the "preservation plan" they supposedly have in place is merely to appease any potential buyer and help convince them this is actually worth something.

Again, this could be a curious installation in a modern museum, but trying to apply old school art value to modern and highly ephemeral piece like this seems a bit of a reach. There will be archivists around in 100 years to validate a Van Gogh painting, but I very much doubt anyone would be able to validate a piece like this.
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Old 10 October 2013   #10
Originally Posted by Artbot: ...but trying to apply old school art value to modern and highly ephemeral piece like this seems a bit of a reach.


On the other hand, maybe it would be easier to maintain a digital validation trail than it can be to try and establish the validity of existing solid works of art. Have you seen the BBC series "Fake or Fortune"? I found it fascinating but hearing about the way the art world operates could also make your blood boil. Whether anyone would be prepared to do so is a different story, but with the British Library moving to archive millions of web pages now I wouldn't be surprised if a group does form to do this, especially if the volume of such work increases. Video installations are nothing new, just the media used for recording.
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Old 10 October 2013   #11
Originally Posted by Artbot: But as circusboy said, this is nothing more than a screensaver. You can make your own with a $50 digital frame. As for the "conservators," I'm highly skeptical that there's a group of people or a foundation that will validate and update this piece in perpetuity. A piece like this has only the value we assign to it, which honestly can be said about most works of "art." I'd guess the "preservation plan" they supposedly have in place is merely to appease any potential buyer and help convince them this is actually worth something.

Again, this could be a curious installation in a modern museum, but trying to apply old school art value to modern and highly ephemeral piece like this seems a bit of a reach. There will be archivists around in 100 years to validate a Van Gogh painting, but I very much doubt anyone would be able to validate a piece like this.


I assume the conservation plan was made in concert with the museum that held that copy. I'm sure a private owner would have to make there own arrangements.

Really, by the standards of modern installation art, there's nothing here that is that extraordinarily difficult to conserve or to sell. To give you a couple of wierder examples:

I forget its name, but the Smithsonian has a large sculpture that was made from florescent light-bulbs. The entire thematic point of the sculpture is that it's using cheap, everyday materials. However, the particular type of fluorescent light-bulbs is no longer made, and of course the light-bulbs burn out periodically, so the Smithsonian now has the light-bulbs hand-blown by master craftsmen.

Or, better:

There was an installation of art that consisted of a pile of candy in the corner of the gallery. The idea was to see how people would react, and whether the dominate social cue for piles of candy in public (you're free to take one) or the dominate ethos of art galleries (don't touch anything) would win out. So at least somewhat interesting, if very much navel gazing. Where it gets weird is that piece of art was bought for north of a hundred thousand dollars by a private collection. You're still free to take the candy if you visit (it'd hardly be the same piece of art if you couldn't), so every few months, the owner goes and buys a new bag of candy from the grocery store. Physically, nothing of the original installation remains.

In short, the fine art world is weird. Frankly, I find it strange even that the value of an original painting of a known's vintage will change by orders of magnitude based on who painted it.
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Old 10 October 2013   #12
Its interesting to think about but I am not convinced. A back lit image with an artificial frame is pretty kitsch but it seems to have worked to a certain degree. Giving installations to galleries for free, meh, PR.

I think the piece is good when the digital aspect is no longer important, here it seems the central selling point.
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Old 10 October 2013   #13
Some very interesting thoughts, personally I found that they were over marketing the art too much as something never done before and this is the new direction of art. To some degree it's innovative but for many of us on here, this is just slow motion VFX in the form of a painting (I thought came to me when I wrote that, the slow-mo in Dredd).

As for the coservation of the painting, I too am skeptical of how this works. The reason being that it's in a digital format, unlike traditional paintings these can get damaged and age over time, and they can't be recreated to the exact brush stroke. Where as these digital paintings are formed with geometry and have exact co-ordinates for each vertice, meaning these paintings can be reproduced to the exact detail. There's also the problem of duplication of the painting(can't tell which is original), you can have the exact same copy just by having the same file on another screen. Another note is who exactly is the artist that created the work since it was a team of artists at MPC, do they get any credit.

Anyways, on the MPC website they have interviews and breakdowns of how the paintings were made. You also see some of the rigs and wireframes in the playblasts, plus explanation of some of the techniques used to create the paintings. Some amazing work by MPC, very insightful and inspiring, great job.

http://www.moving-picture.com/work/...er-transforming

The most interesting part for me was the Maggorts, they had to create a simulation to last 2 hours (180000 frames) and how they were programmed them to react in a certain way.

Edit:Watch out there's nudity in one of the paintings, they actually used a real life model as explained in the video.

Last edited by Darkherow : 10 October 2013 at 02:00 PM.
 
Old 10 October 2013   #14
I felt I was being sold snake oil.
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Old 10 October 2013   #15
Originally Posted by Kanga: I felt I was being sold snake oil.


But each maggot was individually rendered with its own movement!!
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