CG cost and time

Become a member of the CGSociety

Connect, Share, and Learn with our Large Growing CG Art Community. It's Free!

THREAD CLOSED
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09 September 2013   #1
CG cost and time

Hey all!

I'm new to this whole CG stuff. I'd like to get some effects for my short film. I would appreciate if you could give me some approximate numbers....
-How much time does it take for a CG artist to make a matte painting? (with a live action plate, just extend it with a matte painting)
-How much time does it take to alter the location, like adding some elements to the footage (not organic!)
-How much is the cost?

Thanks
 
Old 09 September 2013   #2
You need to provide everyone with more info: How many seconds for each shot? What is it matching? What is going on in the frame? How do you want it to look?
 
Old 09 September 2013   #3
Quote:
I'm new to this whole CG stuff. I'd like to get some effects for my short film. I would appreciate if you could give me some approximate numbers....
-How much time does it take for a CG artist to make a matte painting? (with a live action plate, just extend it with a matte painting)
-How much time does it take to alter the location, like adding some elements to the footage (not organic!)
-How much is the cost?



How much time? Depends on what you want and depends on the artists. Some artists will take a month to do one thing and another artist will do the same thing in 3 hours. Speed of artists vary that is why I never pay in per hour. You get the slow artist you pay more you get the fast artist you pay less but may jip him on the value. I go straight price. Let them guess how long it will take them especially for matte painting. So no hourly for me personally, just per job and let them average it out.

Alter Location - it can be like starting all over again in some cases. Again just depends. Sorry bout the vagueness but the post is vague on what you want.

Cost - again depends on artist and location but for full CG I have found different companies who charage 3,000 per second to 15,000 per second at high television quality. Depending on the country they live in as well it may be a lot less than that.

So it really depends on what you want, where you get it from. Be more specific and hunt specific artists you like and ask them. They'll tell you the exact cost they would charge.
 
Old 09 September 2013   #4
I'd suggest hiring a visual effects supervisor for your short otherwise it's going take you a fair bit of time to figure out the cost and time.
 
Old 09 September 2013   #5
A photo-real set extension? Really depends how complex but hmm a guess at approx 3-4 solid days depending how clear you are about what you want. If its involving 3D and projections then that's a bit more work. I would estimate average rates for this work at 250-500+ a day. Of course it really varies a lot and depends how skilled the artist is, there isn't a great abundance of good matte-painters, particularly if you want it to look natural and real.

A lot of people not quite at a professional level or in established careers can go through the techniques and do a decent enough job, likely a fair bit cheaper, it depends on the result your after and the production values across the rest of the film.

Just a rough stab though so take it with a hefty pinch of salt.

Last edited by conbom : 09 September 2013 at 10:06 PM.
 
Old 09 September 2013   #6
I don't think there will be a single standard.

Think about it. Set extension of a child's bedroom is not the same as Set extension of Sistine Chapel.

My thoughts are you'd look at it per project, per item. No two are alike.
__________________
"Your most creative work is pre-production, once the film is in production, demands on time force you to produce rather than create."
My ArtStation
 
Old 09 September 2013   #7
Fast. Realistic. Cheap.

Pick two.
__________________
leighvanderbyl.com
 
Old 09 September 2013   #8
Thanks All!

Yeah, I know, more details would help, but I'm really after some ballpark figures. Since my post I talked to some guys, and maybe I have a chance to work with them because they seem really motivated by this project.

Thanks!
 
Old 09 September 2013   #9
In my experience, process is what dictates time. Time is not just a sum of the hours for each asset. Did you unwrapper know that the xforms were busted and now as a result the uvs will be stretchy? Did your matte painter know that the shot will be color corrected to look a certain way in post? All of these things matter.

I've had directors that wanted to move forward with texturing before the models were approved, which became a shitstorm later because the models changed, the uvs changed, the texturing had to be redone. Naturally they blame the modeler, but the director was at fault.

I've tracked shots and done fx for easily a 3 minute shot to find out later they editted it down to a 20 second shot. That cost them a ton.

You can get all the estimates in the world but if your pipeline runs like shit, the work will look like shit, even if it's fantastic for the hours put in. If you're planning on directing a pipeline you've never been a part of, you're in for a bad time. Find someone who has managed a pipeline before and get them on your team, don't try to do it yourself. (If money is an issue.)
 
Old 09 September 2013   #10
Thanks!

I'm a planning freak... For CG and its integration if I can get it work for my film, I'll discuss the whole workflow with the CG guy. So probably we will discuss the scenes which require VFX and when shooting those parts the CG guy will be there to get the best results. And CG will be applied only when editing is 95% finished. So I try to be really economical both in time and money.
 
Old 09 September 2013   #11
On the off chance that your short film budget can't just hire a vfx supe, (call it a hunch I have about the booming short film market...) I think a very concise dictionary for common VFX processes is here:

http://www.videocopilot.net/tutorials/

The examples are mouse over-fast, and the tutorials execute. The execution is important because, "like in this movie here..." is a nightmare note because there will usually be some debate over how something was done. I have definitely heard much more senior people than me say, "Oh, I thought they did it this way...". It may help you refine what you ask for ("it would be cooler AND cheaper if I do this" is the place to be : ) and get what you want.

I actually think Mr. Andrew Kramer is the most charismatic tutorial producer you could ask for, as a bonus.

Cost? I am sure ILM would take your money if you have enough, or a gifted intern/film student could do it for free.

If you see what you want, or something close, in those tutorials, and do find a gifted student that is working through them anyways; that would be the most economic possiblity. And pay them something.
 
Old 09 September 2013   #12
Thread automatically closed

This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.
__________________
CGTalk Policy/Legalities
Note that as CGTalk Members, you agree to the terms and conditions of using this website.
 
Thread Closed share thread



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
CGSociety
Society of Digital Artists
www.cgsociety.org

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright 2000 - 2006,
Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Minimize Ads
Forum Jump
Miscellaneous

All times are GMT. The time now is 04:09 PM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.