Want to sell my story to a studio

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Old 08 August 2013   #16
Originally Posted by iamhereintheworld:
Artbot: I think you're being discouraging on purpose for some reason - if no one came up with any ideas, the studios would go out of business, so obviously they DO look for new ideas.


I'm not that knowledgable of how things work but I believe that people are forgetting that nearly most of the films today are adaptions or base off something, studios aren't going to risk it all on an unknown. You've got to prove something to them before they are willing to give you a budget. When you look at what ideas are made into a film or animation they come from mainly book or novel and comics that has been published with success, so there aren't really that many "new" ideas from scratch. The other route is becoming a well known director first. That's why it's best to start with a smaller idea and get noticed before embarking on an epic.

The best example would be Shane Acker who created a short film "9", which later was seen by Tim Burton, who decided to produce it into a feature animation 9.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_Acker

Believe me everyone on this forum probably has a brilliant idea and wants to make their idea into a major film or whatever medium they prefer.

Apart from getting noticed and having a screenplay/script, I've been wondering how do people get to the point of pitching an idea to a studio? Do you put together a whole load of preproduction and meet with a studio? How do you set something like that up, is it even possible to setup?
 
Old 08 August 2013   #17
Originally Posted by doffer: Can anybody name a film (big famous feature, or smaller national) that is written by an "outsider" of the studio? I can't really. Though I obviously don't know about every movie made. Hence my question, it would be interesting to know.




So - you mean studio employees write the stories? As in, they are people on the rolls of the company? How and where do I search for these jobs? There's gotta be a website somewhere?
 
Old 08 August 2013   #18
Originally Posted by Darkherow: Believe me everyone on this forum probably has a brilliant idea and wants to make their idea into a major film or whatever medium they prefer.



I'm not even saying that my ideas are the best thing since sliced bread. I just "had a little idea", and I would like to see that come to something - if Doraemon can exist, my idea can too.
And make me enough, to live a decent life. I'm NOT looking to become a billionaire off this, though of course, I wouldn't object if that happened
 
Old 08 August 2013   #19
google is your friend

If there is a topic where "google is your friend" is a good answer, this would be it.

No, not because the OP is too lazy to google it out herself/himself. Instead, because the answer require a serious digging that the OP might better off googling latest trend himself/herself.

This is what I found:

http://www.cinemablend.com/new/Newc...-Ups-36845.html

Yes, its for theathre - my point is that OP need to google a lot, browse a lot of screenwriting forum, and last but not least, try look into OP local market.

http://www.scriptmag.com/features/t...arket-scorecard

And try reading into "trusted" sources such as ScriptMag.

That's is the best answer I can give.

However, there is another venue where you can basically sell ideas (good painting does help though) TV. TV is where (based on countries, though) you can actually sell ideas. Usually at a pitch sessions. If they like your idea, they will get the screenwriters, studios, and what not to turn your ideas a reality. But this differ from countries to countries.

I guess the most simplest way to sell ideas is log lines competitions. Only if they like your premise, do you get to write the script.

Hope it helps!
 
Old 08 August 2013   #20
If the idea is good, then DO something with it.

Write an outline, and find a screenwriter online who will turn your outline into a script. Otherwise, do some research into screenwriting and do it yourself (although seriously, this is difficult...if you really want to actually do something, get a professional to do it).

If the script is awesome, you can either submit it through an agency, or try to make something of it yourself.

Hire a storyboard artist, and plan out the film. Stick it all together in an animatic, and show it to some actors, some student film makers, and try to create it yourself. Shoot 15 minutes of the movie, and put it up for free online. Get interest in the idea that way, and see where that leads.

I had an idea for a story that would never get made, and an idea for a game that would never get made, so I decided to combine the two and do it myself. There is NO reason you couldnt do the same.
 
Old 08 August 2013   #21


In this case the guy had connections through directing music videos--probably met people-either an agent or producer.
With the other link-they list all the managers and agencies that represented the script seller. If an outsider tries ending a script to a studio they usually send it back unopened with "no unsolicited materials" stamped on it.

I know someone who worked at a big studio and a co-worker sold an animation script for substantial money but he met a producer at work and I am not sure the film got made or if it did-it was so altered from the original concept to be unrecognizable.
 
Old 08 August 2013   #22
Originally Posted by iamhereintheworld: So - you mean studio employees write the stories? As in, they are people on the rolls of the company? How and where do I search for these jobs? There's gotta be a website somewhere?


Yes, animation studios hire screenwriters. Along with a team of story artists who draw proposed scenes as storyboards and come up with gags, and often the director himself involved in the writing, they make the stories within the studio. There are story team jobs listed on the website sometimes http://www.pixar.com/careers# although I think if you're a writer, you really need to start by writing, because it's what you've written before that gets you the job offers for other work. Look at careers of super-successful screenwriters like Michael Arndt -- he wrote Little Miss Sunshine and won critical acclaim for that, then got hired to write Toy Story 3. So: write a lot, and winning academy awards for your writing doesn't hurt. I'm not clear from your posts whether you've even tried writing a screenplay yet, so I can't stress enough that you need to actually be writing things in order to be a writer.

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Old 08 August 2013   #23
I would take Artbot's advice as realistic rather than deliberately discouraging. The chances of an unsigned writer selling a script in Hollywood are exceedingly small and there are very few places which take unsolicited scripts (Star Trek TNG was one of these exceptions).

Most 'unknown' writers selling scripts in Hollywood are signed with agents. They submit their scripts to an agent, who takes them on if they think they can sell the script - the agent only taking them on to get their 10-15% cut. You can give this route a go, Google talent agencies who take on writers and see what their submission policies are.

I'm not sure Quentin Tarantino is a good example, he had already made a feature for $5000 (which never got released), lived in LA and met industry contacts. Not sure about Enchanted, quick browse of Wikipedia says it sat in development hell for 10 years and was rewritten several times - probably wasn't recognizable from the original.

There aren't people in the film industry who just come up with ideas, the closest person with that in their job description is the writer or the producer - who also have other functions to perform.

The advice of making a short film is certainly more realistic advice, but only if you want to be a director.

Some animation studios take story pitches from staff, but that relies on you getting a job at the studio to start with.

What about your local industry? There are a few animation studios in India and the film industry is quite big there. You might find it easier to pitch your idea to a local producer who is able to get stuff done. Even if your animation idea is taken onboard, maybe having a live-action idea ready to go as well.

If your really convinced about your idea, the only thing to do is make it however you can, in whatever medium you can manage - novel, film, comic, video game.
 
Old 08 August 2013   #24
Originally Posted by iamhereintheworld: So - you mean studio employees write the stories? As in, they are people on the rolls of the company? How and where do I search for these jobs? There's gotta be a website somewhere?


Yes. Either it's a full time employee of the company or, more frequently, they contract someone to work on one film. Unlike in live action, where the script comes first and everything else follows, for animated films the story is usually developed in collaboration between the script writer, storyboard artists, and director. As such, they need someone working in house.

As far as I know, they only hire people who have proven themselves on other projects. I don't think I've ever seen a job posting for a screen writer position on a studio website.
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Old 08 August 2013   #25
Originally Posted by earlyworm: If your really convinced about your idea, the only thing to do is make it however you can, in whatever medium you can manage - novel, film, comic, video game.


I think comic is a great medium, and is great suggestion.
Not expensive as a film, but if it's well written and painted, it can be not only independent medium, but base for a film, or 3D animation, that some producer would like to produce (after seeing comic).
Now, when I am think of it, I can't imagine medium that is more suitable for a producer then comic. Dialogs must be short and clear, composition good, direction of shots (in the terms of chronology and clearness) must be as best as it can be... and so on.
Even (unique) color harmony could be established, if the comic is in color.

So, if I am in the place of iamhereintheworld, I would certainly go with comic.
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Old 08 August 2013   #26
Originally Posted by Pyke: If the idea is good, then DO something with it.

Write an outline, and find a screenwriter online

I had an idea for a story that would never get made, and an idea for a game that would never get made, so I decided to combine the two and do it myself. There is NO reason you couldnt do the same.



For all those wondering, I have already *written* something, that's not something I'm going to hire someone else to do, I ENJOY doing it. And it's for TV. I've written the story for 2 episodes, and I'm sort of doing the third one now, as far as my mind will let me (I'm also busy with the "if this doesn't work, something to fall back on"). So what I have is a little over 2 episodes worth, and I'll be working on it again, of course.

Pyke, your game.. is that the one mentioned in your sig? I can't go to the site right now as my net balance is really low, but.... how did you get it made yourself? How did you pay your bills while you were making it? And was it successful? Did you make money?
 
Old 08 August 2013   #27
Originally Posted by earlyworm: Most 'unknown' writers selling scripts in Hollywood are signed with agents. They submit their scripts to an agent, who takes them on if they think they can sell the script -


How come this hasn't been taken over by the web as yet???!!! There HAS TO BE a site for this, I can't believe something this important doesn't exist.....?
 
Old 08 August 2013   #28
Originally Posted by iamhereintheworld: but.... how did you get it made yourself?


I bought a whack of books, read a ton of tutorials, and taught myself the programming side.

Then I bought a midi keyboard, recorder, and sourced some software and taught myself the sound design of things.

Essentially, it was a lot of reading, a lot of research, and a lot of trial and error.

Originally Posted by iamhereintheworld: How did you pay your bills while you were making it?


The game (so far) has been entirely self funded. Time wise, the game is being made after hours and on weekends.

Originally Posted by iamhereintheworld: And was it successful? Did you make money?


Not yet. Its been covered pretty extensively in media, and while I've been offered a few publishing deals, I'm staying independent for as long as possible!
 
Old 08 August 2013   #29
Originally Posted by iamhereintheworld: How come this hasn't been taken over by the web as yet???!!! There HAS TO BE a site for this, I can't believe something this important doesn't exist.....?

Huh?
There are a million websites for writers and indies.
Major studios don't work like that, same as major labels don't sign people on by scouring every website, programmers aren't solely recruited based on their OSS contributions and so on.

You also seem to not quite get the distinction between an idea and a finished script and treatment.
Great ideas and premises are less than dime a dozen. Pieces poorly and quickly written down are only marginally rarer.
A finished piece that also works as a script and that is ready and polished as a treated cinematographic or episodic piece is the difference between having an image in your head and a finished oil painting. Millions of people have these brilliant things stashed away in their head, only a selected few after much practice convert them successfully into text that can be translated into images.

Yes, Will Smith told his kid to never let him be told he couldn't do something, but his kid was seven
Part of adulthood is to realize you have, most of the time, put some hard miles down towards your objective, do instead of talking about the ecosystem around it you might or might not believe exists or doesn't exist.
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Old 08 August 2013   #30
My grandmother wrote a novel (wow that was over 20 years ago, anyway) about the north Louisiana area before, during and after the civil war. Very similar to Cold Mountain. It wasn't picked up by a publisher so she self published it. She wanted to develop it into a screenplay but at the time there wasn't anyone in this area that did that so she did it herself. She eventually sold it to Clint Eastwood. He was fairly fresh from making Unforgiven so he was looking for a next project and thought it was a good story. He never did anything with though.

The point is, if its a good idea put in the hard work and make it happen. Of course she was also a retired school teacher so she didn't exactly need a fall back plan.
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