artists with depression?

Become a member of the CGSociety

Connect, Share, and Learn with our Large Growing CG Art Community. It's Free!

THREAD CLOSED
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07 July 2013   #31
Another point is that many peoples make a big deal of meds. There are side effects to them (not the kind they list on TV lol), but they only last until your body metabolize the meds. Once it does, you don't have any "buzz" or ill effects from the meds and you can function normally.

In my case I take them before sleeping, which mean that I never felt the side effects in any case and when I wake up I'm quite ready to go about what I have to do during the day.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #32
Originally Posted by vlad74: How do you know it is not going to work for him Leigh? You are usually quite reasonable but not on this one.


So you really think it's okay to tell everyone to just ditch their meds and not believe their doctors? I think that's an incredibly irresponsible thing to suggest to complete strangers, and, like I said, why people should never, ever take advice of this sort from the internet.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #33
Absolutely not. I would never say that to anyone. It is not my responsibility. I just got the impression that you discard any other alternatives to taking medications. Your post sounds like. I dont think Matthew was saying ditch your meds. I think he just gave himself as an example that it is possible to go out of deep depression without them .


Originally Posted by leigh: So you really think it's okay to tell everyone to just ditch their meds and not believe their doctors? I think that's an incredibly irresponsible thing to suggest to complete strangers, and, like I said, why people should never, ever take advice of this sort from the internet.
__________________
http://www.vlad74.co.uk/
 
Old 07 July 2013   #34
I often get very melancholic right after I wrap a long project, as if pouring so much energy onto something drained me of my lifeforce.
__________________
My Deviations
 
Old 07 July 2013   #35
Originally Posted by eliseu gouveia: I often get very melancholic right after I wrap a long project, as if pouring so much energy onto something drained me of my lifeforce.


When something good comes to an end, it's often followed by a period of sadness. You are mourning the loss of that beautiful thing. It's normal, and if you accept it and understand it, it can lead to some even better art.

As they say, "it is better to have love and lost, than never have loved at all".
 
Old 07 July 2013   #36
Those with opinions regarding mental illness/ depression treatments are certainly entitled to them. The fact remains that there is science and evidence-based practice which informs treatment - so any supposition based on guesswork is only that - we aren't the experts. I would read a couple of books before guessing the efficacy of drugs etc. Medication (especially SSRI's ) can help regulate chemical imbalances in the brain (but have side effects)- but so can programmes designed for changing thinking patterns, such as CBT - which has a high efficacy rate as it treats the root problem not the symptoms. It depends on the individual and the severity of the condition.

CBT is likened to a person struggling with puzzle piece they can't fit in their minds, try as hard as they may. CBT seeks to show them that it is because one of the underlying pieces has been forced into the wrong place - therefore the puzzle needs to be rebuilt in the correct manner. It is faulty thinking often that leads to anxiety and depression - the habit of shaping incoming data to fit a dysfunctional irrational patterns in the brain. The brain's neural pathways can be rerouted through practice - thus control over the damaging primitive limbic response (panic/ sadness/ anger) hopefully can be attained. The science is only emerging - so throwing Valium at everything is now becoming taboo as it only creates addicts.

In any event we are primates with a hardwired survival system being forced behind desks and into stressful modern lifestyles. We evolved to run and hunt, engage in extended family groups with plenty of companionship but now often we ignore each other on trains and sit bound to screens 24 hours a day, is it any wonder we sometimes feel unhappy - and I think artists can be quite prone to introspection and self criticism. Best wishes all.
__________________
AM Alumni
 
Old 07 July 2013   #37
Originally Posted by leigh: This is a great example of why people should never ever take medical/psychiatric advice from the internet. Telling people to ditch their meds and distrust the medical profession is reckless and stupid. If it worked for you, great. But that doesn't mean it's going to work for everyone else.



I'm someone who had their life seriously messed up for a number of years by the advice of a medical proffesional. I had a siblings life nearly destroyed by over prescription of unnecessary pharmaceuticals and lost a friend to anxiety medication prescribed by medical proffesionals.

To present the term 'medical proffesional' as some kind of absolute pillar of truth I think is absurd. Open discussion on the internet, sometimes going the opposite of mainstream consensus needs to be taken into account as well.

I wouldn't declare my experience as anything statistically prevalent. Just that, I have most certainly encountered instances where the smartest thing a person could have done is just slap their doctor in the face and throw every med in the trash. There are bad doctors. The pharmaceutical industry is a capitalist for profit industry that can push it's product too hard when unnecessary. It is only through an individuals self-awareness and personal research that they could escape such a situation. I wouldn't say distrust any doctor, but don't automatically trust them.

Last edited by techmage : 07 July 2013 at 08:37 AM.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #38
About my personal experiences with depression and what I've found.

Diet is huge. I think the subject is hugely under-represented and not ever talked about nearly enough, most people don't even realize the depths to which diet goes in effecting daily mood and life. The fact that pamphlets that say 'Diet and your happiness' are not sitting next to the Cymbalta and Prozac pamphlets in a doctors office makes me highly suspect about some things.

Not all doctors do tests like this, you must seek them out. But there are doctors that will do extremely comprehensive and detailed tests for sensitivities to a wide range of foods. People know about the obvious sensitivities like gluten, lactose and nuts. But these are just the ones that manifest grossly obvious symptoms. There is a whole range of food sensitivities that manifest anything from full blown body rashes, all the way down to extremely minor things like, making you slightly more prone to inflammation and thus pain or headaches. Or may cause increase in irritability and psychological disturbances. These things are extremely minor so no one ever associates them with certain foods or even realizes the possibility. But you should really do yourself a favor and seek out a doctor that can do a highly detailed and comprehensive food sensitivity test, usually it is naturopathics that do this. I met a women who had discovered after years and years of knee and hip pain, it was actually caused by a minor allergy to sugar cane products, weird sensitivities like that are actually very common for alot of people. If you have any health issues psychological or physical it's really in your best interest to get a test like this done.

The other thing can make a huge difference, and is getting more attention, but I still run into alot of people who aren't aware. Is proper supplementation depending on your circumstance. If you live in an area with low sunlight you should be supplementing Vitamin D 2000 iu+ everyday, this alone can make a night an day difference if you live somewhere with low sunlight. You should also try supplementing fish oil that has DHA, just go on google and read about DHA, it has large potential for effecting depression. Magnesium can cause a pretty big change. Usually general medical practitioners don't really go very deep into the supplementation subject. It can potentially provide alot of benefit to seek out someone in your city that specializes in blood work and supplementation. More naturopathics tend to do this than traditional doctors.

Not that I'm a full on naturopathic supporter through and through. But atleast when it comes to food sensitivity testing and supplementation, alot of benefit can be potentially had, or possibly even a complete fix for alot of issues can be found. All the while having very low risk of side effects or adverse issues.

Anyways, I'll stop being a doctor now. I bring that up just because, it helped me alot and usually when I come across someone who thinks they are depressed, they have not thoroughly investigated food sensitivities and the potential of supplementation. If your eating something slightly toxic to your body for 20 years everyday, this can really cause some issues. I have really seen the depths of depression and after discovering that I had severe gluten intolerance, a strong sensitivity to high glycemic diets, and a tendency to be deficient in some pretty benign supplements, and then correcting all of that, I'm pretty much ok now, things could always be better, but I am no where near depressed. And I've been like this for over 3 years now.

Last edited by techmage : 07 July 2013 at 08:35 AM.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #39
Originally Posted by sinbad: We evolved to run and hunt, engage in extended family groups with plenty of companionship but now often we ignore each other on trains and sit bound to screens 24 hours a day, is it any wonder we sometimes feel unhappy - and I think artists can be quite prone to introspection and self criticism.


Well we arent tigers who are meant to hunt and run and pace when confined to a cage--humans get tired fast. lol I agree we should be outdoors, not isolated, and not in climates that contribute to stress--however I would bet that mental illness, depression, and anxiety disorders go back a very long time--as far back as foot, back, and sinus problems.




This week a friend with depression and anxiety disappeared suddenly. Turned out she had overdosed on prescribed depression medication and was in hospital for a few days. She had personal problems which weren't being addressed. This is what I found frustrating when I pursued treatment. They didnt want to hear about circumstances-life problems, nothing----only get me on drugs and then check in on me perhaps once a month or longer.



Saw this in wikipedia about creativity and mental illness.
Didnt know about schizophrenia in Einstein's family.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #40
Originally Posted by leigh: This is a great example of why people should never ever take medical/psychiatric advice from the internet. Telling people to ditch their meds and distrust the medical profession is reckless and stupid. If it worked for you, great. But that doesn't mean it's going to work for everyone else.


i didnt tell anybody to ditch their meds.. i was using myself as an example to try and give somebody some hope maybe they will not have to be on meds all of their life

i didnt say i felt great because i simply stopped meds or did i recommend that. I guess it could be read that way, but that's not what is intended.

All id say about trusting psychiatrists, particularly American ones, however is it is a bit like trusting Mcdonalds with your diet, simply becuase they are a food corporation.. you should never just stop meds and they play an important and neccessarly part in peoples complex lives. But you need to make sure your not having a load of junk shovelled down your throat by Ronald Mcdonald and look for all the alternatives possible.

Last edited by matmonkfish : 07 July 2013 at 09:39 AM.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #41
The pharmaceutical industry is one of the biggest money making machines on this planet. I ve seen interviews with people who had worked in the marketing departments of such companies. It made my hair stand on end!!!
Great post Techmage!
__________________
http://www.vlad74.co.uk/
 
Old 07 July 2013   #42
I fully agree with Leigh on this one and would even go so far as to suggest not allowing these kinds of threads here at all anymore. If your truly suffering from clinical depression, this isn't the place to discuss it, even if you want to stay away from trained professionals (of the medical/psychiatric kind)...

edit: badly formed sentence.
__________________
unofficial Softimage community
 
Old 07 July 2013   #43
Originally Posted by techmage: To present the term 'medical proffesional' as some kind of absolute pillar of truth I think is absurd.


Where did I do that? What I was responding to was what I interpreted as a suggestion in Matmonkfish's post that when you're diagnosed with something, you can possibly ignore it. I find this increasing mistrust of science in this day and age highly frustrating - it's part of a growing anti-intellectualism movement that is causing great harm to both our species as well as the rest of the planet. I don't deny that there are many unscrupulous individuals in the medical field, but I'd say they're in the minority; the majority of those working in the field have a genuine desire to help, and the knowledge to do so. If you were taken to the emergency room with a pain in your side and diagnosed with appendicitis, you probably wouldn't think twice about going through with the surgery to remove it and the follow up medication. And yet, when it comes to mental health, we see, time and time again, how people say "it's all in your head" and other comments which stigmatise sufferers, and it's even worse when those who suffer from mental disorders themselves then get caught up in this, start mistrusting their diagnoses and then ignore what they've been advised to do by their doctors. We wouldn't do it for any regular diseases, so why is mental health treated differently? Just because you're not bleeding profusely from a wound, are suffering from some crippling internal pain or have a tumour growing inside you doesn't mean your condition is any less real.

Speaking as someone whose family, and extended family, has experienced a lot of mental illness, particularly bipolar disorder, and has witnessed the tragic results of it, from alcoholism to suicide, I find it infuriating when people make comments like "oh just because you were diagnosed with a condition doesn't mean you're stuck with it". Because actually, yes, sometimes you are - conditions like bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and others are conditions for life that do need to be managed, and often medication is an important part of that management.

The OP mentioned that mental health problems have a high prevalence amongst creative people, and this is absolutely true. For this reason, I think this thread is worth keeping open because I'm also interested to read about people's experiences in this industry with regards to how their co-workers and employers dealt with any issues they may have had. More openness and more discussion about these issues is a good thing, because it's clear that there are still many widespread misconceptions about the entire topic which can lead to prejudice.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #44
Originally Posted by superhooman: ...how many of you may deal with depression issues...


Yes I was/had it. It took me almost 2 years to recover from it. FIGHT CLUB helped me .
__________________
If it's not real-time, it's a piece of shit not a state of the art technology" - me

magic happens here... sometimes
go nodeway
 
Old 07 July 2013   #45
Originally Posted by leigh: There are a lot of misconceptions about depression in this thread, which is a bit frustrating to see considering how much effort has been put into awareness campaigns and such to educate people about depression as an illness. For many people, specifically those with clinical depression, it's not something they can just snap out of by making a few changes. Depression is just as debilitating an illness as any other, it's not simply "all in the mind", and yet sufferers continue to experience stigmatisation and a lack of sympathy from both their peers and their employers.

It's shameful.

The most sensible post of this thread, and it shows you have close experience. Im on and off depression all the time, and although, yes, sometimes improving your habits helps, there are times when medicine is the only thing that works. I had severe attacks last christmas, and being able to take a pill was the only way to calm down when all I could think about was jumping out the window. The only thing that gave me time to change my habits and turn my life around.

I swear the next person who tells me that Im depressed because I want to be depressed, or that there are others who are worse off than me, Ill clean their teeth out.
__________________
Power corrupts, and absolute power gets the job done.

Blender tutorial - Boxmodelling a head
 
Thread Closed share thread



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
CGSociety
Society of Digital Artists
www.cgsociety.org

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright 2000 - 2006,
Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Minimize Ads
Forum Jump
Miscellaneous

All times are GMT. The time now is 05:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.