3d artist career path and goals

Become a member of the CGSociety

Connect, Share, and Learn with our Large Growing CG Art Community. It's Free!

THREAD CLOSED
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  06 June 2013
3d artist career path and goals

This is a question asked myself and others but I've never been clear on the answer.

You see, I'm very much an "art is its own reward" type of person, so I've never put serious thought into it. I could model for the rest of my life and if I had enough to live off of I'd be happy. But still, I'd want to make my own show/game/film or what have you at some point. But how do you get there from here?

Example: Art school spits you out and if you're skilled and lucky you get hired on at a TV animation studio as, say, a Prop Modeler. Then if you're good you may get promoted to Character Modeler. Then to Lead Modeler/Manager of the Modeling department.

Then what do you move up to? Art Director? Does the Art Director ever pitch a show idea to the studio? When and where does that jump occur? I'm only familiar with a few cases involving writers and storyboard artists, so what are some good examples of people who did it?
 
  06 June 2013
It's a lot easier to make it to director/writer from personal projects and nothing than it is to make it there from the trenchlines of a VFX facility.

Start writing, start shooting, get noticed, ask questions later.
__________________
Come, Join the Cult http://www.cultofrig.com - Rigging from First Principles
 
  06 June 2013
Originally Posted by Maverick3d: Example: Art school spits you out and if you're skilled and lucky you get hired on at a TV animation studio as, say, a Prop Modeler. Then if you're good you may get promoted to Character Modeler. Then to Lead Modeler/Manager of the Modeling department.

Then what do you move up to? Art Director? Does the Art Director ever pitch a show idea to the studio? When and where does that jump occur? I'm only familiar with a few cases involving writers and storyboard artists, so what are some good examples of people who did it?


That's not really how it works. People don't get hired as prop modellers and then promoted to character modellers. At least, that's not been the case at any studio I've ever worked at. While some modellers do indeed specialise as character modellers, all modellers are generally required to do whatever kind of modelling needs to be done. To be a lead or even a department head requires not only artistic ability but also the ability to manage people, a skill that many (perhaps most) artists don't have.

The art director works in another department entirely. In my own experience, the art department has very little to do with the modellers, and the rest of the CG crew. The art department usually works together with the client, and then briefs the supervisors who in turn brief the leads.

And no, the art director does not pitch shows. An art director is concerned with the visual development and direction of the work coming in.

If you want to make your own films, then going into a studio as an artist is not really the way to do it.
__________________
leighvanderbyl.com
 
  06 June 2013
This:
Originally Posted by ThE_JacO: Start writing, start shooting, get noticed, ask questions later.


And this:

__________________
www.artbot.com

 
  06 June 2013
Originally Posted by Artbot: This:


And this:


The second graphic looks way more interesting.
__________________
The terminal velocity of individual particles is directly related to pink rabbits on a bank holiday.
Characters, Games, Toys
 
  06 June 2013
If you want to do your own thing (creating your own IP--intellectual property), then going to work for studios as another cog in the machine is not going to get you there. What you need to do, is to develop your own ideas. Learn storytelling techniques and how to write screenplays. Learn to make practice short films (using friends and family) with affordable consumer cameras/camcorders. Learn to do VFX with off-the-shelf software.

After you've done a few practice short films that look pretty good, you can then start thinking of something a bit more ambitious, such as a more serious project. Look at what Freddie Wong is doing with his Youtube channel. He's able to make a full-time living off of his fun little short films.
 
  06 June 2013
I would recommend, strongly, reading through Timothy Albee's CGI Filmmaking book. A bit out dated on his discussions regarding hardware and software - basically, everything is so much better and more affordable now - but Tim certainly knows his stuff and is still applicable today.

It also pays to get experience working with others. Online collaborations are a good option as they give you the chance to learn from others, and in the process make friends who might able to help you out down the line, and of course you can return the favour.
__________________
Silo, 3D Coat, Blender
C, C++, Java

Currently working on...HCR #42
 
  06 June 2013
I myself would love to make a fully animated film. I want to push cgi to its limits and make a "non-childish" movie. It would be based off in my own world and have a powerful feel throughout the entire motion picture. It would have visuals like final fantasy xiii.

However, I'm not sure how to acomplish this. Or even where to start to climb the ladder.

Last edited by Jarklor : 06 June 2013 at 12:24 PM.
 
  06 June 2013
Originally Posted by Jarklor: I myself would love to make an fully animated film. I want to push cgi to its limits and make a "non-childish" movie. It would be based off in my own world and have a powerful feel throughout the entire motion picture. It would have visuals like final fantasy xiii.

However, I'm not sure how to acomplish this. Or even where to start to climb the ladder.


Jarklor, my sausage, you have already started to climb the ladder. You just have to accept that you are a beginner and that you cannot expect too much of yourself. A film like Final Fantasy: Advent Children, is the combined effort of many talented people...not just an individual.

Remember that student film of yours? Well, that's the first step on your ladder to success. Take the next step and learn some more about modelling, maybe a little more about rigging and animation. Just keep it as simple as you can without biting off more than you can chew.

Believe it or not, ILM did not jump from T2: Judgement Day to Iron Man 3, over night. Nor did Weta Digital go from Heavenly Creatures to An Unexpected Journey in five minutes. And those are the biggest vfx studios in the business. They gradually grew over the years in resources and talent.

So, plan for 3-minute films for now which you are confident you can achieve with the tricks you currently know. In between projects, set aside time to learn new skills or to improve existing ones.
__________________
Silo, 3D Coat, Blender
C, C++, Java

Currently working on...HCR #42
 
  06 June 2013
Originally Posted by leigh: That's not really how it works. People don't get hired as prop modellers and then promoted to character modellers. At least, that's not been the case at any studio I've ever worked at. While some modellers do indeed specialise as character modellers, all modellers are generally required to do whatever kind of modelling needs to be done.


I think this is a game industry/film industry split. It seems like almost all of the larger game studios have specialized character artists and specialized environment artists (unlike in film, though, they're expected to both model and texture).
__________________
kevinbakercg.com

Last edited by Meloncov : 06 June 2013 at 05:10 PM.
 
  06 June 2013
Thread automatically closed

This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.
__________________
CGTalk Policy/Legalities
Note that as CGTalk Members, you agree to the terms and conditions of using this website.
 
Thread Closed share thread



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
CGSociety
Society of Digital Artists
www.cgsociety.org

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright 2000 - 2006,
Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Minimize Ads
Forum Jump
Miscellaneous

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.