High School Student animating. ....

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Old 05 May 2013   #16
I found CGI also helped my traditional skills because I had never learned through organized training and focused on clay more than drawing so fundamentals of 2d art were not really explained to me and it was intuitive and trial and error. Now when I go back to traditional clay work I think of it in a more organized fashion--seeing objects as geometric-lines--measurements, seeing a logic behind the designing and not simply working intuitively.
I spend much more time with cgi though because I just find it more creatively interesting.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #17
Interesting. When I read in a drawing book about putting curved lines around shapes to make them look like 3 dimensional forms it clicked with me as in 'hey that's like a wireframe version' because I have the 3d background too.

And as much as I love stop motion I don't really see myself ever doing it in a serious way over CG animation. Those guys have no CTRL+Z, and that's just nuts LOL

Cheers,
Brian
 
Old 05 May 2013   #18
Originally Posted by XLNT-3d: High School? Try Middle School. Kids in my son's middle school are already learning 3ds max and Inventor.


Wow?! Middle school....man...I guess it's possible for them to do simple object animations but as far as probably adding bones to the character, fixing envelopes, and doing hand keyframing....it's going to take a whole lot of time ...but I guess it's still possible
 
Old 05 May 2013   #19
Originally Posted by MissOptimist: Wow?! Middle school....man...I guess it's possible for them to do simple object animations but as far as probably adding bones to the character, fixing envelopes, and doing hand keyframing....it's going to take a whole lot of time ...but I guess it's still possible


Yea I thought the same thing. Unless they're really talented in math and art I would think a student prerequisite would be algebra 1 for a class in like Maya or Max. I started learning Maya in college and when I first started it was like anxiety overload at the interface alone. I can't imagine middle school students being able to navigate the program very well but maybe they're really smart and gifted and I'm just old already. Like last year's smartphone...then again that would be more like smartphones from six months ago. The rate in which things become outdated is insane. Anyways...
 
Old 05 May 2013   #20
Originally Posted by ebbandflow: Yea I thought the same thing. Unless they're really talented in math and art I would think a student prerequisite would be algebra 1 for a class in like Maya or Max. I started learning Maya in college and when I first started it was like anxiety overload at the interface alone. I can't imagine middle school students being able to navigate the program very well but maybe they're really smart and gifted and I'm just old already. Like last year's smartphone...then again that would be more like smartphones from six months ago. The rate in which things become outdated is insane. Anyways...


Your missing out on the simple fact of why middle school and high school exist. It's at an age when minds are far more open to experiencing and learning. In all my years of teaching I've always found that the chance to teach young kids is always the most rewarding, they are far more interested and want to experiment and don't get bogged down by having to learn as that's what they do all day. Adults are terribly stubborn learners for the most part even in our industry which to me really is why I got into and love this industry so much, is the constant need to learn.

I'm actually going back to my old high school next week to teach a 2 day workshop on Motion graphics next week, its always one of my favorite types of teaching.
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Old 05 May 2013   #21
Originally Posted by Horganovski: And as much as I love stop motion I don't really see myself ever doing it in a serious way over CG animation. Those guys have no CTRL+Z, and that's just nuts LOL



I sometimes think about trying it again--although if I did I suspect i would want to use computer animation(or at least after effects and photoshop) to enhance it.

Last edited by kelgy : 05 May 2013 at 06:36 PM.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #22
Yeah, I think mixing different media and techniques can give very interesting results. I did the rigging for these guys who are making a short at the moment that uses photographed sets with CG characters. I think the results are going to be pretty cool.

http://tinyinventions.com/blog/

Cheers,
Brian
 
Old 05 May 2013   #23
Yeah that's neat. I prefer to use as little cg as possible when I can use something else. I'd much rather add cg to live action footage than have it all cg. Not to mention its easier on the rendering side
 
Old 05 May 2013   #24
Originally Posted by LucentDreams: Your missing out on the simple fact of why middle school and high school exist. It's at an age when minds are far more open to experiencing and learning. In all my years of teaching I've always found that the chance to teach young kids is always the most rewarding, they are far more interested and want to experiment and don't get bogged down by having to learn as that's what they do all day. Adults are terribly stubborn learners for the most part even in our industry which to me really is why I got into and love this industry so much, is the constant need to learn.

I'm actually going back to my old high school next week to teach a 2 day workshop on Motion graphics next week, its always one of my favorite types of teaching.


Ok then...I don't quite get what I'm missing the fact on in that I'm just saying they're both really advanced programs to be taught. I never said they shouldn't be taught all I said was they need a decent understanding with math as the programs deal with x y and z axis and stuff dealt with in algebra. Hence, taking algebra beforehand would be helpful in understanding the interface. If the student is in middle school and knows algebra then great he should take a class.

I would of killed to be able to take a course in 3D CG in high school but it was never offered. I don't quite understand how this makes adults stubborn learners as I always wanted to learn 3D in the first place but in high school only classes in photoshop, illustrator, final cut and InDesign were offered. Math has always been my Achilles heel but after algebra I'm sure I would of caught on (to a 3D program). I guess it should depend on the math placement in school. The better you are at math the higher math classes you take at an earlier age(middle school). I mean you could have kids at an earlier age mess around with making cones, cubes, triangular prisms or what not I guess it depends what kind of stuff is going to be taught in the class since Maya (or Max) is a beast of a program in terms of what you want to do.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #25
I don't think it's necessary for a kid to understand algebra to be able to navigate in 3d space. They do it all the time when playing video games. It's like telling someone they can't play the guitar until they can read music fluently. Give them some chord shapes and a couple of pentatonic scales and you'll be surprised what they can come up with. There are musicians who have made millions that never really progressed beyond that, heh.

Of course to develop a pro-level skillset in CG they need some math, programming concepts etc. But I bet you could teach any bright kid the basics of poly modeling or simple animation without bogging them down in too much technology and I bet they'd lap it up if they find enjoyment in it. CG apps like Maya etc are huge complex programs of course, but most people don't sit down and learn them from end to end, they pick an area that interests them, like modeling, or animation, or texturing and learn that first. Then they branch out as needs arise or their interests take them.


Cheers,
Brian

Last edited by Horganovski : 05 May 2013 at 12:21 AM.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #26
With 3d modeling, I don't think it requires much math skills. Yes you have to use real life measurements to create realistic characters and environments but that's only very basic math. If anything, art and visual skills are needed more than math skills when it comes to 3d modeling, texturing, and animating. These require attention to details, shape, form, color, and movement. Let's not forget about fundamentals of art
 
Old 05 May 2013   #27
My horrible high-school math comprehension was vastly improved since from working in 3d. For art related creation math (or a lack there of) isn't the end of the world. Great art skills are where its at.

For more technical disciplines; scripting and programming math is a necessity however.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #28
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