High School Student animating. ....

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Old 05 May 2013   #1
High School Students in 3D animating. ....

Guys, take a look at this. This animation is pretty good for a sophomore student, especially if it's all just been hand key framed. Check it out:

http://myitowntv.com/media/2005/Evil_Approaches/



Do you think students are advancing more and more in 3D nowadays or what?



Last edited by MissOptimist : 05 May 2013 at 02:54 AM.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #2
There are a lot more resources out there for high school students out there now than there were a decade ago. In addition to everything available online, most every degree-granting art school with a 3d program has a high school pre-college program, where high school students are creating work roughly on par with your average college freshman.
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Old 05 May 2013   #3
I agree, they do have way more resources now, very lucky kids!
.Look I found , more high school students' work:

http://www.studentanimationfestival...shows/2011-2/3d

 
Old 05 May 2013   #4
The phrase you're looking for is: "We live in interesting times."
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Old 05 May 2013   #5
i remember being in high school back in 2005 and absolutely loving 3dtotal's collection of free, quality tutorials
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Old 05 May 2013   #6
Don't see whats so different about the times, I learned 3D in highschool back in 1998 first Strata 3D then Mirai/Nendo and Cinema 4D. Their piece is a lot better than what I did back then, but I also didn't have the technologies we do now and renders took waaaaaaay longer. our renders for 17x11 300 DPI posters usually took all weekend.

I'm envious of how much more the tools can do easily now, and how much faster things are, but at the same time we had an advantage back then in that there was a lot less to learn in regards to tools and technologies. None of the packages had built in GI for example.
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Old 05 May 2013   #7
I graduated high school in 2005 and the most advanced computer class we had was "portfolio making with photoshop". Even that was not really the proper use of photoshop, the teacher related PS to more like mspaint with more tools.

Wish I would of had the early start with 3d that seems might high schools have today.
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Old 05 May 2013   #8
High School? Try Middle School. Kids in my son's middle school are already learning 3ds max and Inventor. I will be starting an outreach program myself to recruit and develop talent from the middle school and local high school. Of course, my own kids will be coming into the studio to work with our workstations and software as well as on their traditional skills.

You can start seeing how they are oriented at the earlier age as well. Which ones gravitate towards engineering, architecture and/or the artsy side.

Last edited by XLNT-3d : 05 May 2013 at 05:46 PM.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #9
The standard is going up for sure.
I've spoken to someone who has worked in the animation industry since the 90s and they said that back then if you were willing to work with 'the box' at all you had a good chance to get employed. These days computer skills are a given and it's the ones with strong ideas and artistic skills too that will get the work.
That's a good thing in my book ultimately as it pushes us all to do better and gives a better end result for the audience. Life is too short for watching ugly stuff move about badly

Cheers,
Brian
 
Old 05 May 2013   #10
Originally Posted by XLNT-3d: High School? Try Middle School. Kids in my son's middle school are already learning 3ds max....


Yes that's happening all over. In our school we were able to avail of that (if we wanted to) from about 13 years old. They didn't have the full house of industry softwares that colleges have, but they did have Max, Maya, ZBrush and Photoshop. The big problem our school had was they didn't really have teachers qualified to teach the software, and they kind of learned it along with students after normal school hours. The teachers were barely a page ahead of the students, but they were as keen as the students to play with 3D and learn as much as they could.
It was fun learning along with the teachers, and I think the after hours tinkering with 3D was the only time we called a truce and didn't see them as the enemy.
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Old 05 May 2013   #11
Its good for someone demonstrating they have learned various pipeline aspects of cgi animation, however there is a strong "default settings" aspect to it as well. I dont think it demonstrates much creative individuality which would be easier to do with drawing or clay animation even when starting out.

I would have been very happy as a teenager to have had access to photoshop and after effects layers in combination with old fashioned clay animation.I wasnt interested in cgi until decent organic modelling was feasible on a home computer and when I started with box modelling it was really unpleasant and counter intuitive.

Then again when I first tried a commodore 64 my interest in it dropped mainly because I couldnt do much with it in an artistic way. If today's technology was available then (I remember seeing some mid 80s brochures for extremely high end line drawn graphics of the space shuttle and an eagle) maybe I would have stuck with it more instead of playing games.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #12
Ah those sweet 90+ frame pans for when you thought stuff was way cooler to dwell on than it actually was.

He's probably beyond his teens now but this kid always impressed me-I think the world first saw his stuff when he was like 14! Already specializing as an FX TD (in Houdini no less). This article is from a few years back.

http://www.tdt3d.com/articles_viewer.php?art_id=119
 
Old 05 May 2013   #13
Originally Posted by kelgy: Then again when I first tried a commodore 64 my interest in it dropped mainly because I couldnt do much with it in an artistic way. If today's technology was available then (I remember seeing some mid 80s brochures for extremely high end line drawn graphics of the space shuttle and an eagle) maybe I would have stuck with it more instead of playing games.


I guess it depends on your mindset and what interests you. I got my hands on a Vic 20 as a kid (showing my age, heh) and soon got bored of just playing games on it so I learned some basic and even some assembly language and started writing my own games. To me that was a whole world of possibilities. That was when I was 9 or so. Then I hit puberty and 'discovered' girls and guitars so those took over as my main interests for a long time I eventually went back to my geek roots though. The fact that I'm not trying to convince my wife that I'm 'cool' these days has given me more license to be as geeky as I like I guess LOL.

Kinda went off topic I guess, but I suppose my point is that I don't believe in waiting for the tech to catch up, I think there's a creative element in squeezing what you can out of what exists now. We don't like to think about it but long after we are gone people will look back at the software and hardware we have now and see it as quaint and wonder how we ever survived without something that's not even been invented yet. Such is progress

Oh yeah, I couldn't not mention this guy - to me this is Art, even if it's hardly the height of technology, nostalgic I guess but I totally get why he does it. http://www.locomalito.com/philosophy.php

Cheers,
Brian

Last edited by Horganovski : 05 May 2013 at 08:43 PM.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #14
Originally Posted by Horganovski:
Kinda went off topic I guess, but I suppose my point is that I don't believe in waiting for the tech to catch up, I think there's a creative element in squeezing what you can out of what exists now.


Yeah I get what your saying.

If I had been into programming and being creative that way--it would be a different story since you could experiment with the computer.
I remember playing this barbarian video game which was pretty simple pixel graphics(it must have been the amiga at that point)--the barbarian made "huh! huh! noises as he used his sword and when he got killed a spectral skull cloud rose over his head-- (one of the opponents with this monstrous tin man creature that made cool sounds as it walked) it was pretty neat actually.
I thought one could animate a little story out of it but I didnt have the mind for that kind of creative expression--coding etc.

But I was 12 or so when I got introduced to a commodore 64 I think- I had already been fiddling with clay at the same time and been widely exposed to film related effects. It simply offered more creative freedom, more room for experimentation with puppets and other things.
I had wanted an 8 mm camera but my father who worked in audio visual was much more keen on new tech so he got a video camera (much more expensive) and also completely useless for stop frame animation in the mid 80s.

Eventually I got a film camera on my own and was able to do animation as I wanted. I think one of the first things I animated was a Headless Horseman.
I experimented with panes of glass and other stuff.

Then again in the early 90s I lost interest in stop motion because of my technical limits (couldnt rig a projector to run one frame at a time and doing rear projected matte work or making foam rubber models).
I could see in the early 2000s that possibilities opened up for organic animation on a home computer (photoshop blew me away when i first tried it in the 90s).
But it was hard adjusting to box modelling and not being able to hold objects.

But even after years of doing cgi I still like working with models and puppets and ideally I would rather work with kabuki style models on rods and use digital erasing (I tried doing rod erasing with stop motion and film using paint on glass--didnt work well).
But I felt it essential to learn cgi because I could see the potential it offered to individual film experimenters--but I think the traditional background I had come from was a great asset and is very useful to me now in making sure things dont look too "cg" or sterile.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #15
That sounds great. I'm a huge fan of Stop Motion and really get what you say about having something tactile to interact with (in a similar way I much prefer to play guitar or bass rather than sequencing music even though I love Kraftwerk and Vangelis etc and am comfortable with DAWs).

In a way I'm trying to get more of that grounding you have now I guess, I'm learning to draw recently which is kinda painful to begin with but I'm convinced it will help my CG work. As you said, it's totally an asset to have a more traditional background.

Cheers,
Brian
 
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