Have i "made a huge mistake"?

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Old 05 May 2013   #16
Just keep working. That's the best advice I can give you.
I had the same problems and never got something finished, mostly because I thought it would never turn out good enough and that I made some huge mistake at the start of the process.
And this made creative work almost impossible for me.
But when I got the chance to work in a real job with real deadlines and no time to overthink ... well I still had the problem of overthinking, but I had to finish it. And everytime I got a project done it turned out quite nice and much better than I thought it would.

So keep going, don't give up. Join a challenge.
Just do it.
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Old 05 May 2013   #17
Don't doubt yourself too much, doubt creates bad work, and bad work creates doubt. Try to break that cycle with sustained effort and focused study. Don't be afraid of making bad work either, see each piece as an opportunity to find new areas that you can work on... But don't quickly burn through pieces either, thinking that you will inevitably just get better through sheer volume of work. Creating good art requires attention.

ďNobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, itís just not that good. Itís trying to be good, it has potential, but itís not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesnít have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone Iíve ever met. Itís gonna take awhile. Itís normal to take awhile. Youíve just gotta fight your way through.Ē


― Ira Glass
 
Old 05 May 2013   #18
I picked up Art and Fear yesterday after reading this thread.

I'm about halfway through so far. It reaffirms some things I already knew and gives me some other ideas to think about. Basically, it comes down to something deceptively simple and yet impossible for many:

If you want to make art, make art. Just do it. Make it happen.

Unfortunately, so far at least, the book doesn't seem to assuage the fears of someone trying to make art professionally; to have a career in it. It seems to say to keep creating art and ignore those concerns. But 'art' doesn't care if you don't have a job or a real life outside of it. As much as the author says to make art for yourself and not get hung up on what others think of it, what others think of it is what pays your rent and puts food on your table (or not). For someone staring down 35, unemployed and living in a basement but making unappreciated art because they have a need to, the advice may seem a little trite and unpractical.

That's the book so far at least. I intend to, you know, actually finish the book before I pass any real judgements.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #19
Yeah further on in the story it does go into the commercial aspect.
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Old 05 May 2013   #20
An idea is the first step to both success and failure. Just jump in and go where it takes you

If you're having a creative block, don't worry. In the industry most of the times you'll be told what to create anyways
 
Old 05 May 2013   #21
This times 10!
Originally Posted by JamesWarren: ďNobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, itís just not that good. Itís trying to be good, it has potential, but itís not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesnít have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone Iíve ever met. Itís gonna take awhile. Itís normal to take awhile. Youíve just gotta fight your way through.Ē

― Ira Glass


Additionally, I assume you were able to complete the projects related to your coursework, so you must possess the ability to finish something based on a set of criteria. Perhaps you become aimless when all possibilities are on the table. Limitation is the mother of creation IMHO. Strict limits on time, subject matter, tools, techniques, setting etc. can sometimes bring out the best in your abilities. Since you're working toward a demo reel I would certainly avoid the pitfall of going for big, complex story driven stuff. They are hiring you for your skills not your writing and directing chops. Two or three short isolated shots or stills of something nicely done but otherwise unrelated to any narrative is far better than a 1 minute half baked "Short". Even if you are simply imitating or re-imagining something you have already seen elsewhere. Actually almost everything created these days falls into that category so forget about trying to be all original and focus on simply, doable stuff that hopefully highlight your best skills. Everyone struggles with this, you're not alone at all. Good luck!
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Old 05 May 2013   #22
Learn to love the process of creation. As you don't have professional deadlines it should be enjoyable and therapeutic. Don't be afraid of creating 'rubbish', learn from mistakes. Avoid comparing yourself to the greats - that way madness lies and you won't see the point in creating anything. Have the confidence to carve out your own style. See any good results as a bonus
 
Old 05 May 2013   #23
Originally Posted by JamesWarren: ďNobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, itís just not that good. Itís trying to be good, it has potential, but itís not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesnít have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone Iíve ever met. Itís gonna take awhile. Itís normal to take awhile. Youíve just gotta fight your way through.Ē


― Ira Glass


+1

That pretty much sums it up. Nice quote.
It's really important to actually finish projects/have deadlines, so you can learn from past projects and understand your weaknesses and strenghts.
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Old 05 May 2013   #24
Make sure to finish a piece. As in, you modeled and textured and posed but didn't do the detail pass. Or you finished the model but didn't create the background, or the set or something else you planned.

It's all those little things at the end that push you just a little more and make you that much better.
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Old 05 May 2013   #25
Originally Posted by Tama: Perhaps you are simply not creative and or not productive at a rate fast enough to compete against others better equipped? Better to find out now than to waste more of your time in a field that is a bad fit for your abilities or lack of them. If so, keep the art endeavor as a hobby and find another field for an occupation.


Wow.. harsh criticism. Is that how it is in Saudi Arabia? If you're not great out of the box, F it and try something else.

If I took your criticism back when I was struggling, I wouldn't have the great life I have now.
 
Old 05 May 2013   #26
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