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  04 April 2013
Maybe they're just designed that way to look good and to emphasize a part of the story or the vision?

I think some kind of chronological realist perspective of what should be in our planet by the year XXXX really doesn't factor in at all.
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  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan: Maybe they're just designed that way to look good and to emphasize a part of the story or the vision?

I think some kind of chronological realist perspective of what should be in our planet by the year XXXX really doesn't factor in at all.


I'm just hoping that there's an in-movie explanation for them using 150 year old tech. That's all.

Even thought I'm not 100% sold on the designs, I think the vfx look great, so they'll get my money.
 
  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by leigh: Really? I think his accent in a Blood Diamond was pretty much spot-on.


Yeah, I thought Leo nailed it too. I have a couple of ex's from SA and Leo's accent sounded just like I remember those girls' fathers. As they chased me down the drive way. Whilst carrying a shovel.
 
  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by Pixanaut: I'm just hoping that there's an in-movie explanation for them using 150 year old tech. That's all.

Even thought I'm not 100% sold on the designs, I think the vfx look great, so they'll get my money.


I'll add that there are no existing exoskeleton designs like what is shown in the trailer. The contraptions that DARPA and the like are experimenting with have huge limitations, serious material inadequacies and no reliable long-term power sources. Yes, all these aspects will improve, but when? 5, 10, 20 years down the road? I'd venture to say it's even longer than that, especially where durable, compact, long-lasting power sources are concerned.
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  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by Artbot: ... I'd venture to say it's even longer than that, especially where durable, compact, long-lasting power sources are concerned.


Off topic:

LENR units from Defkalion (based on Andrea Rossi's designs) will sort out any portable power needs. Defkalion has been flying under the radar for the last 12-18 months and are expected to have a major announcement in August of this year. (The announcement is expected to be about application developments for the technology, not a proof of concept. It's generally accepted that we're well beyond proof of concept at this point.)

It's my opinion that LENR and 3D printing (plastics, edible 'meat' products, tissues for medical needs, chemical compounds, etc...) are the two technologies that will completely revolutionize our civilization.

Last edited by Pixanaut : 04 April 2013 at 03:22 AM.
 
  04 April 2013
With all the hype about graphene for power storage I'm wondering whether that will be the missing link enabling the neural interface based exoskeleton to be feasible. 30 second charges mean it could have a smaller battery and be reliant on the same charging stations that will be available to electric cars.

This really blew my mind when I saw it:

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2...xoskeleton/all/

Imagine a future when we might see a quadriplegic jog past proudly in an exoskeleton? Bloody amazing really.
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  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by SciFibrow: ...

This really blew my mind when I saw it:

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2...xoskeleton/all/

Imagine a future when we might see a quadriplegic jog past proudly in an exoskeleton? Bloody amazing really.


I think the 'wetwired' connectivity is interesting, but I don't think it'll be around for very long (with regard to overcoming serious injuries). 3D printers are printing functional organs in labs, and if we just want to 'repair' tissue rather than 'replace' tissue, we can now turn a patient's own blood into stem cells using a chemical/electrical process meaning that our very own stem cells can be created from our blood and then grown into new organs that our bodies won't reject, or those cells can be injected to help heal things like spinal injuries.

I'm convinced that in the very near future, paralysis due to injury and likely foreign bodies (bacterial or viral infection) will be a thing of the past. I think they'll be able to jog past proudly without the exo-skeleton.
 
  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by Pixanaut: I think the 'wetwired' connectivity is interesting, but I don't think it'll be around for very long (with regard to overcoming serious injuries). 3D printers are printing functional organs in labs, and if we just want to 'repair' tissue rather than 'replace' tissue, we can now turn a patient's own blood into stem cells using a chemical/electrical process meaning that our very own stem cells can be created from our blood and then grown into new organs that our bodies won't reject, or those cells can be injected to help heal things like spinal injuries.

I'm convinced that in the very near future, paralysis due to injury and likely foreign bodies (bacterial or viral infection) will be a thing of the past. I think they'll be able to jog past proudly without the exo-skeleton.


Aren't there a bunch of people constantly trying to make this type of research illegal though?
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  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by teruchan: Aren't there a bunch of people constantly trying to make this type of research illegal though?


Their argument is primarily based on the ethics of using stem cells harvested from human embryos. The process that I'm speaking of uses the patients own blood cells, which are then converted into stem cells, therefore there is no ethical dilemma.

Trying to make that illegal would literally be making your own blood cells illegal and I'm sure the Constitutional lawyers would have something to say about that. You can't be pro-choice on one side and anti-stem cell on the other, especially if they're your own cells.

Anyway, this is getting waaaay off topic. Apologies folks. I didn't mean to derail the thread.
 
  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by leigh: Really? I think his accent in a Blood Diamond was pretty much spot-on.


I thought it was nasty. Not as bad as others before but still all over the place. It variated from pretty close to really weird.
 
  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by sk3d: I thought it was nasty. Not as bad as others before but still all over the place. It variated from pretty close to really weird.


I think it was his inflexion that sold me more than anything else. Saffers have a rhythm to how they speak and they tend to tag their casual speech sentences with 'ah' similar to how Canadians use 'eh'.
 
  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by sk3d: I thought it was nasty. Not as bad as others before but still all over the place. It variated from pretty close to really weird.


To be fair, he was playing a Zimbabwean, not a South African. The Zim accent is a little more rounded, with less roll on the 'r'. I found his cadence similar to the way that the people from the coast speak-but from what I understand, when he comes to SA he stays on the coast more often.

But there are massive subtleties in the South African accent, which are very difficult to get if you haven't grown up with it. If you know what to listen for, you can sometimes even tell what school a person went to from their accent alone.

But I can tell you something...as a South African, there is NOTHING more grating than a South African accent in a movie.
 
  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by Pyke: To be fair, he was playing a Zimbabwean, not a South African. The Zim accent is a little more rounded, with less roll on the 'r'. I found his cadence similar to the way that the people from the coast speak-but from what I understand, when he comes to SA he stays on the coast more often...



True, he was. And in truth, my frame of reference is primarily my ex's father who is also from Zim. That's possibly why it sounded so good to me.
 
  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by Pixanaut: I think the 'wetwired' connectivity is interesting, but I don't think it'll be around for very long (with regard to overcoming serious injuries). 3D printers are printing functional organs in labs, and if we just want to 'repair' tissue rather than 'replace' tissue, we can now turn a patient's own blood into stem cells using a chemical/electrical process meaning that our very own stem cells can be created from our blood and then grown into new organs that our bodies won't reject, or those cells can be injected to help heal things like spinal injuries.


Yeah, cybernetic vision is in a race with stem cell tech too. Perhaps it's inevitable that the organic route will win the race first (given they've already managed to re-grow a connection between a severed spinal chord and have the brain work out where all the signals were going in the new configuration) but the win for technology is enhancement beyond what's biologically possible. I'm certain neural interfaces and their associated enhancements/memory upgrades will become a must have for the high end thinkers of society like Stephen Hawking. We're so close, when I was a kid I honestly thought this sort of stuff was way further in the future than things are panning out. If we don't destroy ourselves in the meantime, humanity is on the brink of massive, positive change.
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  04 April 2013
Originally Posted by SciFibrow: ... If we don't destroy ourselves in the meantime...


50/50 courtesy of cheap DNA DIY hacking kits and Mon$anto-esque biotech.

(O_o)
 
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