Video Game Addiction Acknowledged

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  03 March 2013
Video Game Addiction Acknowledged

The American Psychiatric Association, APA, is including "online gaming disorder" as an area of study in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

http://www.aljazeera.com/video/amer...1548905353.html

Video game addiction will be acknowledged for the first time in the updated edition of the American Psychological Association diagnostic manual, DSM-5, out in May.

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-sty...ticle-1.1298338
 
  03 March 2013
I don't like how our world is trying to point to some sort of disorder for everything. Just another way therapists can cash in on the parents of all these kids...

Getting angry when "mom" takes away the video games is like crying or yelling when mommy takes away a little girl's dolly. You're taking away something that you like and spent alot of time with.

People play video games for fun and entertainment, no duh they'll get upset when you take it away.
 
  03 March 2013
Quote: "...we wouldn't want anybody to think, when we use the term 'video game addiction' or 'compulsive gaming' that the problem lies in the video games, any more than the problem for an alcoholic lies in a can of beer," Fraser said. "Many people can have one can of beer, and that's it. But others may have a biological predisposition towards addictive behavior in general."
That's a very reasonable and fair statement.

Quote: “Monitoring is very important,” Fraser said. “If you put an iPad in a 6-year-old’s hands, that’s no different than sending them into an R-rated movie theater unsupervised.”
That is not.
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  03 March 2013
Do you think I could obtain a medical marijuana card for this disorder?

If so, I don't plan on leaving my basement for the next few years.

LOL!

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  03 March 2013
I had a cousin who was (still is) addicted to his Playstation for many years. He spends all his time in his room playing games. When we visited as kids he wouldn't come out of his room, we had to go in there so he could show off his latest games and moves. I would get pissed off with that after a few minutes as I wanted to get out and play in the street instead of wasting the precious few hours inside. His Dad had the great idea of forcing him to join the same karate and boxing clubs I was in, but he didn't like getting punched and kicked for real and he left after a few weeks.
He is about 22 or 23 now and working, and still spends all his spare time at the Playstation, It's hammered his social life because he has no girlfriend and shies away from company, doesn't even go out for a drink after work with his workmates.
It's a real pity his parents didn't do whatever they should have to wean him off the Playstation because he is a nice lad in every way. His parents are to blame in my opinion because they knew all along he was a console junkie and they failed to act as parents.
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Last edited by Dillster : 03 March 2013 at 06:46 PM.
 
  03 March 2013
Originally Posted by AJ: “Monitoring is very important,” Fraser said. “If you put an iPad in a 6-year-old’s hands, that’s no different than sending them into an R-rated movie theater unsupervised.”

Originally Posted by AJ: That is not.


Why isn't it?
Giving the power of unlimited choice to a minor on an internet connected device IS the same as unlimited choice in a R-rated movie theater. The comment is not so much about the type of choices he has, but about limits in what he/she watches.
Sure he can play angry birds on an ipdad, but unsupervised he can view anything online. Same goes for movies, he can walk into an R-rated movie theater and watch The Muppets, or walk into another room and watch Saw.
Someone needs to Monitor this. it's called parenting.
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  03 March 2013
Hmm, so eventually this will lead to some taking a disability check for video game addiction. I've seen people claim it for stupider things.

I don't disagree with more parental intervention however your paragraph here...
Originally Posted by Dillster: He is about 22 or 23 now and working, and still spends all his spare time at the Playstation, It's hammered his social life because he has no girlfriend and shies away from company, doesn't even go out for a drink after work with his workmates.
What you are describing is a person with an introverted personality. You mention "shies away from company, doesn't even go out for a drink after work with his workmates." Consider that he may be terrified of the prospect of doing such things. Maybe it's not as strong as fear, but he could genuinely not enjoy being around other people. The Playstation is a safe zone for such a person. I don't know him obviously so its up to you to figure it out. Just consider it before passing judgement too quickly.

Sorry, your statement triggered my autism radar. Certain signs are really obvious.
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  03 March 2013
Originally Posted by leif3d: Why isn't it?
Giving the power of unlimited choice to a minor on an internet connected device IS the same as unlimited choice in a R-rated movie theater.
It's a sensationalist statement. Handing an iPad to a 6 year old is completely different to sending a 6 year old into an R rated movie theatre on their own. I understand the point he's trying to make but it's a silly example.
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  03 March 2013
So everything can be potentially addicting. I wonder, what are the benefits of acknowledging a specific addiction like this?

In other words, if these addicted gamers spent the equal amount of time reading instead, would it be considered a reading addiction?

And how do you treat this type of addiction differently than other addictions?

And if it is important/helpful to acknowledge subsets of addiction like this, shouldn't we have many, many more "official" addictions.
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  03 March 2013
I am hooked on that Street fighter 4. Man I love that game.
 
  03 March 2013
Originally Posted by WyattHarris: .........You mention "shies away from company, doesn't even go out for a drink after work with his workmates." Consider that he may be terrified of the prospect of doing such things. Maybe it's not as strong as fear, but he could genuinely not enjoy being around other people. The Playstation is a safe zone for such a person.......


Yeah you could be right. Whatever made him do what he does, I will probably never know because his parents never got it looked into.
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  03 March 2013
i think i've experienced this just a few months(weeks) ago when i started playing starcraft 2 on my new pc. i already had an SC addiction way back in high school but that's a different story.

with SC2, the first time i had it, i only played campaign since my pc back then was slow, which made me hate the online experience, but that was before my upgrade. so when i installed it with my new pc, i knew from the very beginning it was a bad idea.

based on their list, some are true and some are the opposite for me...

- Secrecy or lying about use
* i didn't really have to lie about playing. i actually talked a lot more about it with friends and family who had no clue what i was talking about. just telling them how fun it is and how it works.


- Spending more than 24-30 hours a week online not for work or school
* this is very true, if you know how sc2 works...time flies really fast for every match.


- Mood shifts, such as increased irritability, if access is taken away
* quite the opposite, i felt more happy and excited the more i played. probably because my mind was always occupied. however i never "stepped away" from it, and i know that once i do step away...i'll do it for good by uninstalling it. which i did. eventually. no irritability spikes or mood shifts to report.


- A significant decrease in other activities and interests
* this is true and probably the reason why i knew it was bad for me. i basically stopped everything else i had planned and just focused on my next game/strategy.


- Neglecting friends, family and other responsibilities
* i've always been a hermit my whole life so this doesn't really apply to me, but i did notice that i was more talkative and more happier when i got hooked on playing.


- Sleep problems
* also another reason why i knew it was bad for me. i'd force myself to sleep, i'd lay in bed close my eyes focus on my breathing etc. but i just couldn't sleep. morning would come and i'd play again and the cycle continued.


- Deterioration of personal hygiene
* also true. i'm a bit of a neat freak. all that changed drastically.

i have no doubts in my mind that video games or online gaming is an addiction. i'm more surprised to find out that this is just being acknowledged. you'd think they picked up hints from stories of WoW gamers.

IMO it's bad when you know things get out of control.
it's healthy if you're still in control.

in my case, sc2 would be my gaming addiction.
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  03 March 2013
Originally Posted by Dillster: his parents never got it looked into.


Heh, you make the guy sound like a car that's making a strange noise that needs investigating by a mechanic. Not to dismiss the entire field of psychology, of course it can benefit some people, but surely parents should be taking an active interest in their child and not fobbing off the 'trouble shooting' to a professional in most cases.

Cheers,
Brian
 
  03 March 2013
Quote: I don't like how our world is trying to point to some sort of disorder for everything. Just another way therapists can cash in on the parents of all these kids...


just another way for some big pharma company to make money off another drug. create the illness and we make the drug.
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  03 March 2013
Originally Posted by Horganovski: Not to dismiss the entire field of psychology, of course it can benefit some people, but surely parents should be taking an active interest in their child and not fobbing off the 'trouble shooting' to a professional in most cases.


I agree. But to do nothing at all is negligent IMHO. Either take responsibility as a parent and guide/help your children if you see they have problems, or get professional help if you can't do it yourself.
 
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