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Old 03-01-2013, 04:30 PM   #16
mantragora
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teruchan


A little off topic: Do you have HiRes version of this photo?
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Old 03-01-2013, 05:23 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teruchan
If you can throw together a quick film for less than $10K, you're guaranteed a profit.



Thanks for the info.
Something to consider.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 06:32 PM   #18
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You're basically describing the old Roger Corman movie process. Crank out the schlock (very quickly!) and reap minimal, but sustainable returns. But all this talk about starting your own IP is a bit naive. Just because someone can use Max or Zbrush, it's a HUGE leap to presume that person would be adept enough to write, direct, design, publicize, market, etc., such a product. Sure, you could collaborate, but that has its own issues and requires even more managerial skills. Besides, I would say the number one problem here is not production, but distribution and sales skills - something most artists are seriously lacking. I'm generalizing here, but most artists don't know when to stop making, and start selling.

I'm not saying it's impossible or that people shouldn't even try. Hell, I'm probably a prime candidate to do such a thing myself since I have experience at all of the above, but just don't have that burning desire to "have my stories told" as it's so curiously put. I have a couple of friends that tried it and were chewed up and spit out on the other side of bad tv deals (and they were young, family-less, and willing to work 80 hour weeks to make the attempt). For every South Park out there, there are 10,000 projects that never get any traction or viewers. Every once in a while I get the urge to try, but I enjoy just doing little side projects and experimenting with stuff too much to take on a huge time-sucking project. Building Legos with my 7 year old is waaaay more fun. :-)
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Old 03-01-2013, 07:18 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artbot
I'm generalizing here, but most artists don't know when to stop making, and start selling.

..and this... Building Legos with my 7 year old is waaaay more fun. :-)


I agree completely. I'm in a position where I need to start drumming up work for the studio or face the inevitable. At past companies, it seemed easy to sell our services and work. However, I underestimated the relationships that the marketing people had developed and nurtured over the years. I had always walked into a room or meeting with a client that had a need and was willing to spend money. I was just the final push or voice of confidence so it seemed easy. Now I am pounding pavement and shaking trees and its much harder without the marketing guys that opened doors and spoke highly of me. It's my newest challenge, and by far the most difficult.

My priorities in life have changed as well. I have four kids and when I get around them, I love being a dad and family man way above anything else. Shoot, they are always begging me to work on the computer and work in 3d or with Photoshop. I refuse and make them work with their hands, paper, paint, drawing, legos, paper craft, etc. I always plan to work on personal stuff or new techniques after they go to bed, but it never happens.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 07:20 PM   #20
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I honestly never would have thought those terrible low budget films could turn a profit, that's actually quite interesting because I enjoy watching them ever now and then for a laugh. Would be kind of fun to try throwing together a super low-budget film and see what happens. Given that I live in Vancouver, I imagine putting together a crew of people looking for more experience (myself included), it wouldn't be all that difficult.... interesting *strokes beard in contemplative thought*
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Old 03-01-2013, 07:23 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grantmoore3d
I honestly never would have thought those terrible low budget films could turn a profit, that's actually quite interesting because I enjoy watching them ever now and then for a laugh. Would be kind of fun to try throwing together a super low-budget film and see what happens. Given that I live in Vancouver, I imagine putting together a crew of people looking for more experience (myself included), it wouldn't be all that difficult.... interesting *strokes beard in contemplative thought*



might as well have a go at it. What's there to loose?
 
Old 03-01-2013, 07:43 PM   #22
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The mockbuster business model has been around for a long time and it works. I think there needs to be 2 mockbusters for every hollywood produced film. It would dilute their revenue stream and level the playing field a bit (provided you had good distribution).
 
Old 03-01-2013, 08:06 PM   #23
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I tried something like this around Vancouver a few years ago--it was incredibly frustrating dealing with wackos. People just werent true to their word, they didnt take things seriously (well before one even got to shooting). I wasted about a few hundred but it could have been thousands. I know of someone who lost over $10 000 because their lead actor didnt show up. Heard similar anecdotes from others.

Met a lot of "producer wannabes" and people who didnt get sci fi or horror. They'd rather make films about alcoholism and what they thought were hysterically funny comedies about marijuana smuggling. or they simply wanted to get government grants which dont tend to favor the sci-fi and horror fields.

There are people doing zero budget horror films here but they generally stick to family and friends or they are out of towners. I met someone who sold a film to Asylum but it ended unfavorably for them.

I probably just dont have the necessary managerial drive to be able to do it alone or simply get too ambitious with what I have here to work with.
But I still think about it as I work on other things.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 09:06 PM   #24
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You make an important point, just because it's low budget and relative low quality doesn't mean it's easy to make a marketable product. I wouldn't recommend trying to pull something like this off unless you've at least got some experience going from a concept all the way through to finished product on your own first. And there is a world of difference between organizing a film project with a cast/crew and sitting on your own plugging away at demo reel materials. So it's still a risky venture, but not nearly as risky as a high budget film.
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Old 03-01-2013, 10:26 PM   #25
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I think anyone can do it if they have little to lose--I didnt even get to filming but it was an interesting experience. But sometimes I felt like Richard Dreyfuss building the mud mountain in his living room scene from Close Encounters.

I wanted to make monster movies. Perhaps if I was willing to make a typical slasher film or a marijuana zombie comedy i would have got a better reception. One time in exasperation I posted an ad claiming I was making a film about a guy with a talking pet fish who has Tourette's and wants to enter a national singing competition while dealing with ridicule from his alcoholic family and some other stuff I cant remember and people thought it was a real movie. I tried to come up with the most absurd idea imaginable and they believed it.Monster movie ads-no response. That ad, lots of responses.


If one is managerial enough I think you can find what you need in town, but no guarantee they'll show up if they say they will. I met one guy who was very very organized and made a couple of DVX films (romantic comedies)but not a marketable subject matter so I dont think he kept it up.
Met a lot of people who dreamed of getting into Sundance. Soderbergh wannabes.

I think I would be better off collaborating online out of town and just handling the post production at home. Anyway I suspect I will return to it eventually.
I am still pursuing related interests so I havent exactly given up, but when I think about trying to do things locally I get a headache.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 10:35 PM   #26
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Well micro budget films seem to be the rage right now in Hollywood:


http://www.deadline.com/2013/03/sin...get-franchises/
Quote:
"EXCLUSIVE: Jason Blum‘s Blumhouse Productions is moving forward on its third micro-budget franchise with Sinister 2, the sequel to last year’s horror pic that grossed more than $87M worldwide off of a $3M budget. The move to build the Sinister franchise follows in the footsteps of Blumhouse’s successes with the Paranormal Activity and Insidious series of ultra-low-budget genre hits."
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Old 03-01-2013, 11:41 PM   #27
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Maverick Entertainment: Which I think is the largest of these distributors. Rumor has it Madonna owns this company. York Entertainment: My buddy Marcus shot a martial arts flick in Thailand, which was actually not bad, and approached this company with it. They offered him $16K for his film. Xenon Pictures: This is supposedly Melvin Van Peebles' company (Mario Van Peebles dad) and they seem to focus on a lot of older exploitation films.


Hmmm interesting. Maybe we could come up with a worldwide master list of distributors and folks who are open to more animation style deals.

That would be interesting.

And as we develop the IP and want to get attention we can direct them to the "CGTalk IP section" to give it weight. That is an idea.

The "How to" make money off your IP guide. Where to find the audience and such would be a good start. Where to find help. Where to find markets for example Teruchen working in Japan. How to not get screwed over?

What are some websites to post to to garner support and interest? I think of Delgo in its day. How did they get 1 million views a month. They said there were about 5 websites they posted on and then folks started coming in and checking it out.

What are the "How to" strategies. Tossing around ideas.

My main market is going to comic conventions and such and drumming up people there. And using portals like Newgrounds to show off comics and series.

Last edited by AangtheAvatar : 03-01-2013 at 11:45 PM.
 
Old 03-02-2013, 05:12 AM   #28
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My feeling is that the people who are making their own "IP" are the same type of people who would have written a book or recorded an album/CD. Some artists have the vision to retain the rights to their own work, others are content to be work for hire - like a technician or sideman in a band.

You also have to consider that the value of the idea is 0.00 until it's popular in some manner.
 
Old 03-06-2013, 05:22 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AangtheAvatar
Hmmm interesting. Maybe we could come up with a worldwide master list of distributors and folks who are open to more animation style deals.


This => Fillim just glued to my Twitter followers group and caught my eye. It says that they are starting early 2013.
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:16 AM   #30
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So many of the b movies that I have seen show up on netfilx but rarely the real ones :/ so how does all this work as far as legality? people are free to produce whatever they want as long as it isn't too directly similar to another?
 
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