If Video Brequendo can do it why can't I? Make a living off IP.

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  03 March 2013
If Video Brequendo can do it why can't I? Make a living off IP.

I noticed a great deal of posts talking about this studio closing and that studio closing.
Truth be told layoffs abound in the VFX industry with the close of so many studios, some being among the best of the best.

There are other posts about developing IP and creating your own way in the world.
And there is a lot of talent who could probably do something on their own venture.

It has been proven time and again that entire series or movies can be made by a small team and does not necessarily take years and years.

And then you have this.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SJKlfitrEM


and then folks who make this



Thing is Video Brequendo has been in business for years. Someone is making a living at this place.

Question is how? And how can we tap into that?
I mean the theory is that most folks here are better than anything these guys put out.
It is possible to create a feature length, series, comic, game or other.

From a business aspect what can we do with our IP once it is created?
 
  03 March 2013
I knew a guy who had similar success with such movies called A Cars Life 1/2 he had his own little production company called Spark Plug Entertainment.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iPTlOgInY0

He wanted me to help him out a few years back, however for personal reasons it wasn't good timing. That said; he did make me quite a generous offer for the fee, so guessing he had success with the first of the two films.

I know that his family were amongst the actors; i believe the voice over for one of the main characters was his son lol despite the business model of clearly ripping off other IPs, it does seem to drive quite a lot of success; be it you might end up selling your soul to commercialism just a little!

I recall in producing the above, he brought together a few 3d artists, which i understand were found on Craigslist and such sites.

All said; I showed the above trailer to a 5 year old some time ago, and he thought it looked pretty cool and didn't really understand, or even care about the whole business model. In the end; its entertaining for kids, one less guy off the streets making a somewhat honest attempt at a living and providing work for a few freelancers.

Dave
 
  03 March 2013
A friend of mine was asking tips for a STAR WARS fan film, and I suggested he make one about a gang of Klingons riding speeder bikes and arriving at Mos Eisley....

I told him: "Once you allow the image of Biker Klingons from Space to show up.. you can take it anywhere it would be almost its own original!"

He didn't do it.
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  03 March 2013
Quote: I knew a guy who had similar success with such movies called A Cars Life 1/2 he had his own little production company called Spark Plug Entertainment. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iPTlOgInY0 He wanted me to help him out a few years back, however for personal reasons it wasn't good timing. That said; he did make me quite a generous offer for the fee, so guessing he had success with the first of the two films.


So how did he sell enough copies? Where did he go to sell? How did he find an audience?
 
  03 March 2013
Quote: Thing is Video Brequendo has been in business for years. Someone is making a living at this place.


IMO, being in business just for the sake of business may not be the best of the ideas. Most of us started because we were inspired by great stories and art. Why would we care if business does well, but we as artists and storytellers remain thirsty and never grow.

As a business model (specially in current scenario) it can definitely work. And it doesn't hurt to look for such options. Probably it's more of a matter of personal view.
 
  03 March 2013
i don't know too much about how he distributed the DVDs, but he had a deal with a few US stores such as Target and a few others. They might have appeared on Netflix at some point too.

Dave
 
  03 March 2013
Quote: IMO, being in business just for the sake of business may not be the best of the ideas. Most of us started because we were inspired by great stories and art. Why would we care if business does well, but we as artists and storytellers remain thirsty and never grow. As a business model (specially in current scenario) it can definitely work. And it doesn't hurt to look for such options. Probably it's more of a matter of personal view.


Not for the sake of business but for the sake of making a living doing what you love and creating your own stories.

I mean if Brequendo can do a whole business that employees folks and is still in business with crappy animation how can a great artist, with original IP make a living or even a small group make a living off their own stuff.

Anyone know what the Netflix deals are like?
 
  03 March 2013
Quote: Why would we care if business does well


That's a little bit of romantic thinking there that doesn't really lean in a positive direction we care because it has the potential to put food on the table, and provide an honest income for ourselves and those we care about. It's also a challenge to accomplish a complete product that can generate an income.

There's art for the sake of personal enjoyment, and then there's commercial art. The two require very different way's of thinking
 
  03 March 2013
Originally Posted by redCigarette: IMO, being in business just for the sake of business may not be the best of the ideas.


It's working for most of Hollywood producers.
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  03 March 2013
Quote: That's a little bit of romantic thinking there that doesn't really lean in a positive direction


Certainly I wrote this while looking at the very first youtube link posted in this thread. I would definitely care if my story does well in business. Personally, I wouldn't spend a year or two ripping off a massive IP just so I can make some money.

I think OP means if somebody can pull off descent rip offs why cant more such smaller groups come in and try their own IP's. I agree to that to a certain extent. I think many people are doing that already.
 
  03 March 2013
This is basically what Asylum is doing with their "mockbusters" as they are called. They make films like Battle of Los Angeles or Transmorphers or Snakes on a Train to coincide with the release of big films. This has been going on since the days of Blockbuster Video and other rental chains.

This doesn't mean you can't make a living with original content. The biggest setback for most will be cost. My guess is that most artists here don't want to make an El Mariachi. They want to make something that is on par with what the big studios are doing or they will not be artistically satisfied. I'm would be happy, personally, if my project's quality is equal to any TV anime show, as long as I can get my stories out there.

I know a guy who did a film called, if I remember, Sorority Sister Slaughter. We're talking super low budget slasher flicks. There are, and I am sure I wrote about this before, a host of guys doing what me and my buddies like to call "ghetto films", shooting on DV, making cheap, gangsta, horror, action or comedy films in the sub $50K range (some sub $10K) and they get distributed on these small ghetto labels and they are making money. A couple of them are millionaires. One guy shoots his films in ten days, finishes a film almost every month. Imagine investing $10K in a film and reaping $60 - $90K every time. That's what some of these guys are doing!

As soon as you stop thinking about the big leagues, I guarantee you that if you finish something, someone will buy it. There is always some TV channel, DVD distributor or small label looking for stuff. They are out there, chugging along, making peanuts compared to the big Hollywood studios, but they are doing what they want and making a living. These ghetto films, though, clearly made enough money that both Sony and Warner Bros. started urban labels just to get in on the action.
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  03 March 2013
Originally Posted by teruchan: I know a guy who did a film called, if I remember, Sorority Sister Slaughter. We're talking super low budget slasher flicks. There are, and I am sure I wrote about this before, a host of guys doing what me and my buddies like to call "ghetto films", shooting on DV, making cheap, gangsta, horror, action or comedy films in the sub $50K range (some sub $10K) and they get distributed on these small ghetto labels and they are making money. A couple of them are millionaires.


Can you give names?
I'd like to research this market especially now that dvd stores are closing everywhere.

Sorority Sister Slaughter is listed at imdb (1.9 rating) but the writer and director are a woman (unless the guy's first name is Susan).
 
  03 March 2013
Originally Posted by kelgy: Can you give names?
I'd like to research this market especially now that dvd stores are closing everywhere.

Sorority Sister Slaughter is listed at imdb (1.9 rating) but the writer and director are a woman (unless the guy's first name is Susan).


My friend's name is Grits Carter. Apparently he was a producer on that. I do remember him telling me he directed Playa in the Pulpit and one called something like Monkeyman935 or something. I don't have access to imdb here so I can't confirm. I used to have the names and sites of all those ghetto distributors, but not on my tablet. I will try to find them again and post back.
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Learn How to Make Your Own Animated Projects!
You don't need millions of dollars or major studio backing!!
 
  03 March 2013
Okay, I found a few of the ghetto distributors Grits pointed me to back in the day, though not all that I used to have in my list. Here are those I could find:

Maverick Entertainment: Which I think is the largest of these distributors. Rumor has it Madonna owns this company.

York Entertainment: My buddy Marcus shot a martial arts flick in Thailand, which was actually not bad, and approached this company with it. They offered him $16K for his film.

Xenon Pictures: This is supposedly Melvin Van Peebles' company (Mario Van Peebles dad) and they seem to focus on a lot of older exploitation films.

Now it should be noted that these companies don't just deal in ghetto, hip hop and gangsta films. They have low budget horror labels, action, even some sci-fi. I also think that not all the films they have were meant to end up here. Some probably had bigger dreams but couldn't sell their work elsewhere.

Before you think it can't be done, I want to give you an idea how bad some of these films are. Imagine a bunch of friends get together, with nothing better to do, and no sccript, but they have some ideas and shoot a bunch of stuff. Someone takes all the sh*t they shot into Final Cut Pro and tries to make a coherent movie out of it. They use some hip hop sample libraries and throw on some music, add crefdits and ship it.

Of course they have some decent stuff too, but generally this is stuff that doesn't make the cut even on SyFy, or any TV channel for that matter (one of them may have cut a deal with Starz) If you can throw together a quick film for less than $10K, you're guaranteed a profit.

In case you're wondering, if it is so easy, why haven't I done it? I have talked too all of them. They seem to have no interest in cartoons, preferring live action.

This does make me wonder now, though, if I shouldn't take my tablet to that ancient village I visited last year and shoot a quick flick there, throw in some space ships attacking and a few explosions and ship it!

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Terrence Walker
Studio ArtFX
Learn How to Make Your Own Animated Projects!
You don't need millions of dollars or major studio backing!!
 
  03 March 2013
Originally Posted by LuckyBug: It's working for most of Hollywood producers.


Yes but those are more business savvy than your average artist (especially Hollywood producers). Artists are known to have poor business judgement (in general), thats why they get taken so much advantage of.

Also, lots of wannabe producers fail in Hollywood, most probably more than those that succeed. Its just you dont hear much about those cases (thats for a big part why they failed).
 
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