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Old 02-13-2013, 06:09 AM   #1
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L.A. NOIRE Blooper Reel - Outtakes from Capture Sessions applied to Game Scenes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBsg8yPnGR0

Who knew they'd go through the trouble? But I'm glad they did.

Reminds me of "TV's Bloopers and Practical Jokes".
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Old 02-14-2013, 09:11 PM   #2
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Thanks! That was really cool.
 
Old 02-15-2013, 12:19 AM   #3
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The cool thing was they went through the trouble to process the outtakes.

L.A. NOIRE used separate sessions for body and face capture and the face captures weren't even done simultaneously so these "full outtakes" are actually scripted, and probably arranged around the true face capture bloopers.

Things like Cole smiling when other characters have a gaffe could just easily be recycled from "basic smiling" that was provided by the actor while the gaffe for another could come from the blooper reel.

Pretty sure the body captures are new to fit with a "script" for how the real face capture outtake would be integrated.

Again.. I think that's how they would do it because the captures for face and body were separate and there was only ONE capturing setup for the face so actors had to do their thing one at a time.

It's a lot of work for what should look spontaneous.

Should have been an unlockable for getting 100% of the game imo.
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Old 02-15-2013, 01:18 AM   #4
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I think they should have kept things like a sneeze or cough naturally happening in the actual game, very legitimate sound and animation since it just well happens hah.
 
Old 02-16-2013, 07:36 AM   #5
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that was god damn hilarious, great upload
 
Old 02-16-2013, 12:19 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrewty07
I think they should have kept things like a sneeze or cough naturally happening in the actual game, very legitimate sound and animation since it just well happens hah.


A lot of performances really are things of the moments and can be played to death. I even fear mocap gives too much power for perfection, resulting in photo-realistic bad acting - though it happens in series and films as well. You need a bit of stumbling, fumbling and in-the-moment things.
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:18 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeroenDStout
A lot of performances really are things of the moments and can be played to death. I even fear mocap gives too much power for perfection, resulting in photo-realistic bad acting - though it happens in series and films as well. You need a bit of stumbling, fumbling and in-the-moment things.


Well personally, that's the control I long for.

Always hated in live action how the sun is not where you want it, or that costume just doesn't look right, or "CUT! You have your elbow in the wrong place - AGAIN!"

In animation or mocap you can just tweak something more times per minute than you could in live action.

No contest for me.
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:29 AM   #8
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Hah, awesome to watch. Reminds me a bit of an old Toy Story DVD set I had where they included a bunch of "outtakes", glitched renders and broken rigs and such.
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Old 02-18-2013, 03:53 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan
Well personally, that's the control I long for.

Always hated in live action how the sun is not where you want it, or that costume just doesn't look right, or "CUT! You have your elbow in the wrong place - AGAIN!"

In animation or mocap you can just tweak something more times per minute than you could in live action.

No contest for me.


I often feel in that individualistic tweaking of elements you lose the overall characters in some way. Like recording dialogue for characters separately gives you the best tweaks-per-minute but it is almost impossible to get the naturalistic feeling of recording together.

The imperfections you have to make do with because of a lack of full control make things more real for me than the perfections. The sun might not be just right, but that might force you to make a more interesting composition than if the sun was exactly right. Things that are tweaked too often look more like someone's mental image rather than things that are real.

In my opinion, of course. I have exasperated modellers and perturbed sound studios with these ideas of not making things perfect to a fault.

I was recording with an orchestra with a wonderful conductor, at some point, and after playing a piece thrice he said; "well, that sounded good, let's stick with that... or... we could just play it to death." It did strike as something profound in 'live' performances that gets lost through tweaking them or doing them digitally.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:39 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeroenDStout
The imperfections you have to make do with because of a lack of full control make things more real for me than the perfections. The sun might not be just right, but that might force you to make a more interesting composition than if the sun was exactly right. Things that are tweaked too often look more like someone's mental image rather than things that are real.


I agree absolutely that you get it more real by dealing with the imperfections of the actual location and actual performances.

But, and this is a personal artistic quirk, real is almost NEVER what I want. Instead what I usually go after is "real" (note double quotes). You do encounter another kind of imperfection when doing it 100% animated... the quirk in someone's keyframing motion... an artifact in a render that went on the entire sequence....

When I tell animators or lighting artists to go at it... I don't recall ever telling them to get it "as real as possible" instead I tell them "Just make it feel like it's really happening... in the imagination."

"Because it's just a cartoon."

The imperfections that end up being there tend to be a mixed bag... Blurs we used by intent, DOF that's computer calculated, and DOF that is "hand-forced" in layers....rendering artifacts we decided to leave alone...

I remember showing the team a clip from Ghost in the Shell and telling them: "That's as real as I want it." So Live Action is always going to be "more real" forever. But it's just not what I like.

That said, I am not always agreeable with the style of films that defy reality (eg: some aspects of the perfume commercial-like "300")... But that's really a different discussion.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:51 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan
Well personally, that's the control I long for.

Always hated in live action how the sun is not where you want it, or that costume just doesn't look right, or "CUT! You have your elbow in the wrong place - AGAIN!"

In animation or mocap you can just tweak something more times per minute than you could in live action.

No contest for me.

Except in pure synthetic animation we spend untold hours trying to get that shit back in

If you clean too much and too liberally, you end up with crap. You also seem to have a distorted idea of the level of perfection in a shoot, it's hardly ever like that, and you usually shoot iterations, ad libs and takes so you can quickly produce variety and then find the right alchemy later in editing, also something that in a fully synthetic kind of production/environment is extremely costly.

I feel you discount live shoots and production too easily and too much on some very broad assumptions, and I would strongly recommend you try and get some experience with those if you want to become a well rounded director in the future.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:59 PM   #12
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That was really good to watch. Good for them for making the bloopers into entertainment. I think the last time I seen that done was at the end of one of the Toy Story movies.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:59 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThE_JacO
Except in pure synthetic animation we spend untold hours trying to get that shit back in

If you clean too much and too liberally, you end up with crap. You also seem to have a distorted idea of the level of perfection in a shoot, it's hardly ever like that, and you usually shoot iterations, ad libs and takes so you can quickly produce variety and then find the right alchemy later in editing, also something that in a fully synthetic kind of production/environment is extremely costly.

I feel you discount live shoots and production too easily and too much on some very broad assumptions, and I would strongly recommend you try and get some experience with those if you want to become a well rounded director in the future.


Thanks for the suggestion!

Yeah.. I'd probably want to try it again one day. It's just that the first time was so traumatic (I walked out when nothing was coming out the way I IMAGINED it to. It was this Aenid adaptation in college... and we had people in towels with swords... and then that F*CKIN' CONSTRUCTION CRANE SUDDENLY APPEARS... and other stuff that wasn't working. )

It is true the REFERENCE even in animation is frequently a live picture....although we play games with that.

We watched the Schwarzenegger film "ERASER" for example to look at how bullet ricochets work. This is of course ironic, because in "ERASER" the bullet bounces are just a bunch of pyrotechnic squibs - not real bullets bouncing... but it just shows you my view of "how the world in the film is supposed to operate".

But I agree I probably have to go back to live action one day... It's just about mustering the courage (and the budget) to do it.
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Old 02-20-2013, 04:49 AM   #14
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You clearly had a very early, very bad experience in one media, and a well managed, later and much luckier (deservedly luckier, I'm sure) experience with the other.

Both have a lot to teach to the other, and when your job is developing a vision into something tangible for other human beings, be it entertainment, storytelling, or anything else and whatever mix of those factor, you can only become better by leaps and bounds when you go waaaay out of your comfort zone by moving from one to the other.

It might never become your favorite thing, and that's ok, but it shouldn't be discounted so early in your development IMO, lest you grow complacent and monotonous.

I used to think like you, until I got my first job with a second unit, at which point my mind got blown right out of the back of my skull.
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:02 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThE_JacO
You clearly had a very early, very bad experience in one media, and a well managed, later and much luckier (deservedly luckier, I'm sure) experience with the other.

Both have a lot to teach to the other, and when your job is developing a vision into something tangible for other human beings, be it entertainment, storytelling, or anything else and whatever mix of those factor, you can only become better by leaps and bounds when you go waaaay out of your comfort zone by moving from one to the other.

It might never become your favorite thing, and that's ok, but it shouldn't be discounted so early in your development IMO, lest you grow complacent and monotonous.

I used to think like you, until I got my first job with a second unit, at which point my mind got blown right out of the back of my skull.


I promise to do that one day, but you'll have to forgive me if that first try comes in the form of some lame shampoo commercial and all I have to do is direct a woman to whom we will add CG hair extensions later.
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