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Old 03-12-2013, 04:33 PM   #46
i-d
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Igor Dvorski
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Being a freelancer I've been working literaly in every
industry that exists except film and games.
I really like this diversity and couldn't picture myself
rendering cars all year round, not that its anything
wrong with that. I worked for aviation industry,
from business jets to visualizing some special
parts for Eurofighter and it was a bit of challenge
but I'm in love with planes so it was fun learning the lingo.
Had a medical gig some years ago, I remember it as
one of the most fullfiling and rewarding work expierence
in my professional career, not that I really helped save someones
life but just being the part of that was great.
I work for television and motion graphic a lot, its also
very nice and creative niche, much more artistic freedom
than in other fields, diversity too.
Recently I finished a job for a fashion company, it
was fun and good pay. Now I'm working on some
molecular/atom visualizations and I hate that with a passion,
not only that I don't understand most of the terms, I
didn't ever heard of that word(s) and havent much
desire to learn them.
We did choose this profession because it was fun and
it should be fun, because surely its not easy.
 
Old 01-31-2014, 03:30 AM   #47
AidanaWillowRaven
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Aidana WillowRaven
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I'm a book cover artist. Most of my commissions for the last two years have been CG.
 
Old 01-31-2014, 09:48 AM   #48
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Martin Krol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leigh
Well you seem to be the only person I've ever met who works reasonable hours in commercials. Like I said, I did four years in that field and working until 2am was the norm, most days during a job. That's why I got out of it and went into film instead (where I've never, ever worked that late, and in fact could probably count on my two hands the number of times I've put in a few extra hours in the entire 8-9 years I've been working in film). I have a lot of friends working in commercial studios around London and they also seem to spend their lives at work.

So I don't really think it's a generalisation. I think you're just the odd one out


nah. I worked in commercials/tv shows for a while too, and the only thing that threw me off was the instability of work. Especially intros to tv shows. Those are the worst. I swear every time I get some freedom to create anything it goes back to editorial style where actors turn around... so lots of cancelled work.

In fact there have been times where the commercial work would give me wayyy too much time. 3 weeks to create a few hops and barley. no joke. it was such a bore. good pay too.
 
Old 01-31-2014, 10:17 AM   #49
Moleeth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMadArtist
To add to this, simulation is another field to look into. It typically utilizes all the same skills that a game artist would use. I worked for five years at a military sim company basically working on military video games and training software (oops, forgot they HATE to be called "games").

After that, I got into subsea ROV simulation, which is what I do now. Basically, our simulator trains potential ROV pilots without the risk of smashing a multi million dollar ROV into the seabed or something.

At both companies, I wore many hats, as from what I've learned, the software department at sim places isn't as big as other game companies. For example, I could be working on real-time models one week, and the next week be putting together a photo real render for a promo video. A lot of work, but it certainly isn't boring.

Pays good too.


Whio are you working for, Just wondering as I used to do the same thing but over here in the UK! although our sim software was nowhere near advanced as the big players such as CMLabs and very much in-house and in-development. My main use of ROV Simulation was to test new tooling designs and job scenarios for the prototyping and design stage, quite succesfully although a lot of people in the company did not understand the capabilities which led to a lot of frustrations.

Interesting whilst I did it though and good fun being able to use the Simulator which i pretty much had to myself, can pilot one pretty well nowadays although I'm probably a bit rusty with the Schilling Arm Controller now. I left to concentrate more on animation in the same industry.
 
Old 01-31-2014, 10:24 PM   #50
gauranga108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toonman2
I often wonder how is it that software development is so often overlooked as a career option. After having done that for 7 years, I can ell you it's a viable field for 3d artists (or developers, depending on your background). It is certainly nothing like the production world, and the work environment will vary from company to company, but it's another option nonetheless. Worth considering!


Thanks for this post. Would you mind elaborating on this a little bit? I'm having a tough time understanding how 3-D and software dev come together.
 
Old 01-31-2014, 11:04 PM   #51
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Tech Support, Quality Assurance, Program Managers and Product Specialists all tend to have artists or 'technical' artists job descriptions to name a few. Industry experience is usually preferred however. Other qualifications may also be a factor (like multiple languages for tech support can be a big plus in your favor).

Like any job-they can't kill you for applying if you think it sounds fun.
 
Old 02-04-2014, 03:20 PM   #52
Toonman2
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Correct.
3D Software Development is very different from actual production work. However, having production experience brings a lot of value to the table for these companies, since you can use the application the way actual users in real-life production scenarios would. This is not a requirement for many positions, of course, but it is desirable for others.
One thing to consider is that you'd still be working for a software engineering company. Very different environment and workflows from anything to do with production.

I hope this clarifies a little.
 
Old 02-04-2014, 05:00 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XLNT-3d
Forensic and litigation animation has been good to me for about 16 years. We seem to be trending into risk management and training as well. Work has to be scientifically sound and accurate, but not film or broadcast quality. No fame or glory, just better overall security and positioning. Based on our engineering analysis and risk management in the maritime and aviation industries, we are finding that preventative training (scenario analysis) would be far more beneficial than reactionary (minimizing financial losses due to fatalities and litigation)

Plaintiffs hire to increase odds of winning and increasing settlements. Defense hires to minimize financial exposure or to dismiss case altogether.

I've worked the typical hours as others with the occasional all nighters. Never got overtime pay, but got plenty of flexibility, bonus pay, profit sharing, stock options and ownership shares at one company I worked at. I was told early in my career and found out for myself, the ROI in the engineering field is much higher than the entertainment field as well as less cut throat. Can be fun too. We use laser scanning, mocap, visual fx software, 3d, game engines and just about anything else to visualize crashes (planes, trains, ships/watercraft and automobiles), shootings, malpractice, work place accidents, fires, product failures and patent infringement.

Check with litigation consulting firms and forensic engineering companies. Lawyers usually don't hire independents unless you understand the litigation process and have experience surviving depositions/trials (10x more brutal than your toughest portfolio review) as well as creating work that doesn't get excluded from evidence.

What about the info commercial market? I always see animations and visual effects for products.


That sounds really cool. And of course, laser scanning! My favorite part of building-information-modeling includes working with the FARO Focus 3D and associated Scene software to capture existing building conditions. I'm writing a tutorial for it now but as its a company affair I'm not sure I'll be able to release it.

I do some hobby and freelance work in Unity too. Realtime arch-viz is going to be big. There's a company right now that combines real-time architectural workthrough demos and the Oculus Rift. Awesome stuff.
 
Old 02-04-2014, 07:04 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toonman2
Correct.
3D Software Development is very different from actual production work. However, having production experience brings a lot of value to the table for these companies, since you can use the application the way actual users in real-life production scenarios would. This is not a requirement for many positions, of course, but it is desirable for others.
One thing to consider is that you'd still be working for a software engineering company. Very different environment and workflows from anything to do with production.

I hope this clarifies a little.



I see so I'd we working for software companies that would make 3d animation software to sell for example. Working with programmers to create tools for guys like me how would use it.

Yeah?
 
Old 02-04-2014, 07:06 PM   #55
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Like Autodesk. Yup.
 
Old 02-05-2014, 12:45 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by circusboy
Like Autodesk. Yup.

Yeah, Jason Schleifer (currently Head of Character Animation at Dreamworks Animation) started out his 3D animation career as an intern for Alias|Wavefront doing QA on software that would become Maya. You can read about his experiences in this CGSociety article: http://www.cgsociety.org/index.php/...of_weta_digital

Chris Landreth was an in-house artist for Alias|Wavefront when he created his animated shorts the end and Bingo.



I kinda think Duncan Brimsmead has one of the coolest jobs on the planet as principle scientist for Autodesk where he gets to create tools like Maya Paint Effects, Maya Hair, and Maya Toon. You can read about his Maya experiments on his blog http://area.autodesk.com/blogs/duncan/ or watch this interview from 2009 http://area.autodesk.com/inhouse/vi...uncan_brinsmead
 
Old 02-05-2014, 10:32 AM   #57
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The problem for me is finding these companies, for example I've only ever stumbled across companies involved in military sims. Companies like that don't seem to advertise through 'normal' channels, anyone with tips on finding some of these alternative 3 jobs?... and please don't say 'google', I'm continually searching for 3d work in the South-west of England without much success
 
Old 02-05-2014, 03:26 PM   #58
circusboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooner442
The problem for me is finding these companies, for example I've only ever stumbled across companies involved in military sims. Companies like that don't seem to advertise through 'normal' channels, anyone with tips on finding some of these alternative 3 jobs?... and please don't say 'google', I'm continually searching for 3d work in the South-west of England without much success

I used 'google'.

Scroll down to the list on this page:
http://www.4rfv.co.uk/brieflisting....6&company=38348

Often you'll find studio's can't make a living off of one type of client so they do all kinds of 3d work.

Also not sure if you were saying you wanted a job at a simulation developer or that that was all you could find...Anyway in case:
http://www.simulation.org.uk/news.php
Seems to have a 'job board' *if* you become a member.

These are the kind or resources to look for.
 
Old 02-05-2014, 03:37 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by circusboy
I used 'google'.


Thanks for googling for me :-) ...I have found a few interesting places but not like the list in your links. It's not that I specifically want to work for a simulation developer, however I do want to get back to the South-west of England so it helps to broaden my scope
 
Old 02-05-2014, 06:00 PM   #60
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Grahame Fuller
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You can also look here: http://www.siggraph.org/jobs/ (which is really just a front-end for http://www.creativeheads.net/).
 
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