What are some of the other career choices for CG artists other than VFX/Games?

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Old 02 February 2013   #31
Originally Posted by blurgh: ........unless your one of those sorta perma-lancers that stays at just one or 2 studios......


Perma-lancers. That's a good one, never heard that before. My Dad never heard it either, so it seems we have a new word for press people over here to use.
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Old 02 February 2013   #32
Illustration, Motion Graphics, Booth Design, Motion Graphics, Interactive Exhibits, Selling of 3D assets, Virtual set development have been good to me.

I am moving now into 3d asset development for 3d printing, and maybe some custom woodwork.

Small design shops that specialize in motion graphics and video , in my opinion, welcome the skills a fully trained 3D generalist can bring to the table.
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Old 02 February 2013   #33
Theres a rapidly expanding industry for making animated backdrops for theatre shows, you get to work with the show designers and directors and have to collaborate with the projectionists and lighting guys. Theres no specific requirement to get into this, just learn the difference between upstage/downstage and stage left/ stage right and youre fine. Just keep in mind youll often be working with very technically inexperienced people who need to be prepared for the render times.

If you wanted to get into this, I would start putting my show reel around the various companies which handle the projections and systems, and also send off your work to the show designers themselves as this is where much of the work will come from.

Be prepared to travel and bit and make sure youre up to the task of doing last minute changes on low end hardware. Often youll need to visit the show for the last few days of production to sneek in last minute requests, and all youll have with you is your laptop.
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Old 02 February 2013   #34
Originally Posted by imashination: Theres a rapidly expanding industry for making animated backdrops for theatre shows, you get to work with the show designers and directors and have to collaborate with the projectionists and lighting guys. Theres no specific requirement to get into this, just learn the difference between upstage/downstage and stage left/ stage right and youre fine. Just keep in mind youll often be working with very technically inexperienced people who need to be prepared for the render times.
.


He is right,
that is a growing market.
We saw was last xmas the Radio City Christmas Spectacular and it had some really cool CG animated backdrops.
EDIT
here is an article on this (keep in mind this is a HIGH END type of venue)
http://www.sidefx.com/index.php?opt...=2083&Itemid=68
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Old 02 February 2013   #35
infographics

Hi , there is a giant gap that needs to be filled , called infographics, either for print of motion. It is a subset of motion graphics but most companies are looking for it without knowing its proper name.

The most common example of it is in airplanes where you see the security guidelines.

News channels, Museums, convention centers, exhibition designers and medical, design, cosmetic, automotive companies need this badly. Either to point out some info about something important or to pitch ideas about new products, either in their own body for R&D departments or as a representation to some highly respected clients.

These companies, like any non-cg company, pay better than the film & animation industry.
The time frames are ridiculously relaxed. From an artistical standpoint, you get to roam freely as the only guy who understands cg.

Downside is,
1)this is not an established branch of business. No one posts a job saying that they need some infographic artist/designer. They dont know it exists and are even shy to admit that they need a computer graphics artist . Basically, you need to prepare a sample work and approach these companies&instutions to introduce what you do, create your job.

2)Sometimes, the disclosure of the work. Especially for R&D, cosmetic or industrial companies , you basically cant show anything you have done, ever.

Yet, it is slowly being recognized. And I think in the future even user manuals will be videos.

Last edited by mavinova : 02 February 2013 at 11:13 AM.
 
Old 02 February 2013   #36
Just a side not to consider...

If you want to work in the simulation/visualisation/design etc fields it helps a hell of a lot to have some experience in those fields, there is a crap load of jargon and technical/domain knowledge which will help your tremendously and give your clients more confidence..
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Old 02 February 2013   #37
There are several litigation animation companies in Colorado who do forensic animation. Great place to live, low taxes, good quality of life.

Automotive rendering is also a good industry, very stable. Most of those jobs are at studios in and around Detroit.

The tough part about commericals/episodic/features is the freelancing nature where having to look for a new gig every few weeks or months is the norm. Very hard to have a family.. hard to save up for nice toys when youre constantly looking for a job.
 
Old 02 February 2013   #38
Originally Posted by Kabab: Just a side not to consider...

If you want to work in the simulation/visualisation/design etc fields it helps a hell of a lot to have some experience in those fields, there is a crap load of jargon and technical/domain knowledge which will help your tremendously and give your clients more confidence..

I have friends who do work for NASA, and I can confirm this is true.
A background in Engineering or Mathematics helps a lot in this field.

-R
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Old 02 February 2013   #39
Originally Posted by Kabab: Just a side not to consider...

If you want to work in the simulation/visualisation/design etc fields it helps a hell of a lot to have some experience in those fields, there is a crap load of jargon and technical/domain knowledge which will help your tremendously and give your clients more confidence..



Speaking for the simulation field, not necessarily true all the time. I'm sure it helps, but its not needed. I worked for military sims and now ROV sims and not once was I asked if I had a background in the military or the oil and gas fields when I was being interviewed and I had zero knowledge of either field beyond just layman terms. They cared about my work more than anything. All the technical jargon I picked up once I started working there. Again, might not be the norm, but that's just my experience.
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Old 02 February 2013   #40
Originally Posted by JasonA: There are several litigation animation companies in Colorado who do forensic animation. Great place to live, low taxes, good quality of life.


That's where I kick started my career back in the late 90s. I got a real solid base while trailblazing through forensic animations at Fay Engineering back in the day. We love it out in Colorado. I thought the pay generally sucked for artists at the time. Eventually left for due to lack of extended family (and for better pay). Now sick of extended family and ready to move away again. LOL. Was thinking Denmark (was told my kids could attend college for free out there)
 
Old 02 February 2013   #41
Educational 3D simulations. We are producing animations for student courseware for all possible subjects like science, mechanics etc. It's a small department so we do everything from modeling to animation and post production.
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Old 02 February 2013   #42
Originally Posted by XLNT-3d: That's where I kick started my career back in the late 90s. I got a real solid base while trailblazing through forensic animations at Fay Engineering back in the day. We love it out in Colorado. I thought the pay generally sucked for artists at the time. Eventually left for due to lack of extended family (and for better pay). Now sick of extended family and ready to move away again. LOL. Was thinking Denmark (was told my kids could attend college for free out there)

Well dude keep us in the loop. If you leave you will be missed.

-R
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Old 02 February 2013   #43
Originally Posted by RobertoOrtiz: Well dude keep us in the loop. If you leave you will be missed.

-R


By the revenue service

Don't worry. It's just a fantasy. Probably will never happen, but you never know. My oldest son, Ejvind (pronounced Ivan), wouldn't mind living somewhere that people actually recognize his name and not have to constantly educate the moronic locals with a limited mental capacity.
 
Old 02 February 2013   #44
Originally Posted by RobertoOrtiz: I have friends who do work for NASA, and I can confirm this is true.
A background in Engineering or Mathematics helps a lot in this field.

-R


As I'm based in Houston I've done a good amount of NASA-related work for some subcontractors and it is really good paying work, though my jobs actually came about as luck of the draw rather than any sort of relevant experience to what they were doing.

I will, however, say that until I showed myself capable of quickly understanding what they were talking about and interpreting it visually (I was working on visuals for NASA project proposals) I was treated as a bit of a second class citizen by a number of the guys with lots of letters after their names.

Interestingly, it only took one 5 minute meeting to change that. My boss sent me in to talk with some engineers to help them figure out a concept they were trying to visualize. One PhD explained the idea and how they wanted to illustrate it, seemingly pained to be doing so, and I thought for a second and said "what about this?" and roughly sketched out an entirely different idea for him. That engineer suddenly became the most polite guy in world for the duration of the project
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Old 02 February 2013   #45
Originally Posted by fig: As I'm based in Houston I've done a good amount of NASA-related work for some subcontractors and it is really good paying work, though my jobs actually came about as luck of the draw rather than any sort of relevant experience to what they were doing.

I will, however, say that until I showed myself capable of quickly understanding what they were talking about and interpreting it visually (I was working on visuals for NASA project proposals) I was treated as a bit of a second class citizen by a number of the guys with lots of letters after their names.

Interestingly, it only took one 5 minute meeting to change that. My boss sent me in to talk with some engineers to help them figure out a concept they were trying to visualize. One PhD explained the idea and how they wanted to illustrate it, seemingly pained to be doing so, and I thought for a second and said "what about this?" and roughly sketched out an entirely different idea for him. That engineer suddenly became the most polite guy in world for the duration of the project


Yeah, I've had to deal with those types as well. Here's what I tell them, they say, technically I need to address them as Dr. [Insert Last Name Here] and I say "I only address those I need to give a co-pay as Doctor". Then I follow up by telling them that when my sons arrive, they are to address each one as "Master Anderson". Goes over great.

I've had to work with several geniuses. I've found they are more pompous around other intellects, and more relaxed and down to earth with us laymen once they get to know you. However, it does help to keep up with them and learn to interpret quickly.

Last edited by XLNT-3d : 02 February 2013 at 06:57 PM.
 
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