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Old 02 February 2013   #16
Filmmakers usually put their films online after making a run at film festivals. There's only so much exposure a film festival can give you, as for online can make you reach millions.
 
Old 02 February 2013   #17
But if I can be so bold, film festivals still have a role to play because a lot of people in the film industry might still rely on them as filters.
 
Old 02 February 2013   #18
Film festivals will always have a role. Filmmakers always love seeing their work on the big screen! But there are several very reliable filtering sources for online like Vimeo Staff Picks, Short Of The Week or Film Shortage .

If someone has talent he will not be neglected because his video was seen online and not at Cannes. This being said getting into Cannes is any filmmaker's dream and will probably always be!
 
Old 02 February 2013   #19
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan: I have talked to one producer who compared YouTube vs Cannes... and his conclusion was simple:

"Cannes is the past. YouTube is the future."


I dunno man.
It's seems that youtube converts every video in format that has contrast increased by 10%.
I always had problem with subtle lighted area, that on youtube looks like it's 100% black.
I may be wrong, though.

Vimeo is great. I never noticed anything that ruins the video.
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Old 02 February 2013   #20
I think Cannes is going to stick around. They go there to party and make deals. Youtube doesnt have that kind of attraction.
 
Old 02 February 2013   #21
Youtube and Vimeo have changed the playing field for short films, but major festivals still have a place in the film industry - especially festivals like Cannes which have a lot of prestige and glamour associated with them - which is something online video sites can't really offer.

As much as digital technology has "democratized" the film industry - a large part of the it is still largely driven by big-wigs from studios, public film commissions and private investors who all prize the exclusivity of an event like Cannes.

If you think your short film is award worthy, it's still better to go the festival route first than try go viral online.
 
Old 02 February 2013   #22
Originally Posted by earlyworm: festivals like Cannes which have a lot of prestige and glamour associated with them - which is something online video sites can't really offer.


Or can they?
 
Old 02 February 2013   #23
Originally Posted by kelgy: I think Cannes is going to stick around. They go there to party and make deals. Youtube doesnt have that kind of attraction.


I guess it depends on the property being "shopped around". The guy I was talking to was pushing a Sci-Fi film. And at Cannes it was largely ignored... A year later he tries YouTube and boom.... it works.

Says he'll never look at Cannes the same way again.

I guess by that token you can't expect Cannes to be like Comic-Con or something.... different crowds have different tastes.

Maybe if your film is about a pianist in love with his housemaid or something... that's the stuff that flies at Cannes. :P

Originally Posted by marcoluca: If someone has talent he will not be neglected because his video was seen online and not at Cannes. This being said getting into Cannes is any filmmaker's dream and will probably always be!


Actually my dream is a red carpet premiere at Grauman's Chinese Theatre....
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Old 02 February 2013   #24
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan: I guess it depends on the property being "shopped around". The guy I was talking to was pushing a Sci-Fi film. And at Cannes it was largely ignored... A year later he tries YouTube and boom.... it works.


They have (or had) a market at Cannes which is where the films are shopped that are not likely to be an award nominee.
But presumably with so many other films on display there it isnt easy to get people to notice you or watch your film on the spot.
 
Old 02 February 2013   #25
Originally Posted by kelgy: They have (or had) a market at Cannes which is where the films are shopped that are not likely to be an award nominee.
But presumably with so many other films on display there it isnt easy to get people to notice you or watch your film on the spot.


It's also a fuss to get into Cannes... They have a "must be seen here first" clause.. and I've heard things about fees... not sure about that one.

Never really cared about Cannes.. When I think film viewer I think the guy lining up to buy his ticket at the cinema - ready to escape reality for 100 minutes - not the fussy film critic who probably can't understand that when you want to destroy Pearl Harbor.. it is something that sometimes does merit 15 minutes.

But that's just me. :P
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Old 02 February 2013   #26
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan: It's also a fuss to get into Cannes... They have a "must be seen here first" clause..


My first instinct is to say, "oh man, that's such a high opportunity cost," but then I remember that major film festivals go in seasons and that Cannes is relatively early in the season in early-mid May.

For comparison, the LA film festival is in June and Siggraph's in July. So in theory, you're not missing out on too much of the season if you adhere to that clause (fwiw, you will miss Newport Beach, which is late April).
 
Old 02 February 2013   #27
Originally Posted by badsearcher: My first instinct is to say, "oh man, that's such a high opportunity cost," but then I remember that major film festivals go in seasons and that Cannes is relatively early in the season in early-mid May.

For comparison, the LA film festival is in June and Siggraph's in July. So in theory, you're not missing out on too much of the season if you adhere to that clause (fwiw, you will miss Newport Beach, which is late April).


If you are thinking about cinema releases.. yes.
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Old 02 February 2013   #28
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan: If you are thinking about cinema releases.. yes.


Yeah, of course you can't share on the internet but that's not such an unreasonable demand, is it?
 
Old 02 February 2013   #29
Some festivals have submission rules about animations/films not being allowed to have been seen by public previously. That's one of the reasons so many animations only go to youtube or vimeo a year or so, after doing the festival circuits.
 
Old 02 February 2013   #30
While the jury at Cannes have occasionally picked some clunkers (Tree of Life), they've also picked some fairly solid films over the years. I'm sure most people here could pick a few films that they've really enjoyed from the past winners list.

In regards to getting an animated short film in competition at Cannes. If you've got a limited festival budget for your film Cannes isn't really one of the target festivals you should go for - they only take a select few short films each year and animation competes in the same category as live action. The advice I've gotten in the past has been to aim for festivals which are either animation specific or at least have animation specific awards. For example Annecy and Hiroshima are much better festivals to aim for. Even if your not aiming for Oscar glory, their list of qualifying festivals is a pretty good guide of what's around.

In terms of the film market at Cannes, it's really a bit hit and miss from what I've gathered - anyone can try sell their film at Cannes and lot's of people try to and ultimately only a small percentage will pick up any sort of distribution. I expect even less are able to pick up any pre-sales. So without a specific strategy (marketing, pre-arranged meetings, praise, big name stars etc) to promote yourself above the other many thousands of films being sold at the market it's likely not going to sell.

Most of the success stories I've heard about Cannes Film Market (and the American Film Market) largely come from a pre-digital era. For example, a lot of Peter Jackson's early success came from successfully selling Bad Taste at Cannes back in the mid 80s.

The problem is that while film-making is generally easier and more accessible thanks to digital technology, the distribution and exhibition of films to a paying audience is largely still run by a handful of media conglomerates.
 
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