How on earth do people texture like this

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Old 01 January 2013   #16
Originally Posted by icantthinkofaname: How do people get textures this good?
Usually I use photo textures and fit them into a Diffuse map in photoshop and it never looks this good


Am I the only one who finds that example a bit meh?

Texturing is about an attention to detail. You don't just slap a photo into a UV layout and leave it at that - a good texture painter spends time detailing the texture according to the shape of the model, putting in idiosyncratic touches to show how the object is used. In other words, creating details that are motivated.

Studying real life references, and developing an innate understanding of how objects are handled, and exposed to weather and other forces, are essential for texturing.

This is why you get people who specialise in texturing. Because texturing isn't a five minute process.
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Old 01 January 2013   #17
Originally Posted by leigh: Am I the only one who finds that example a bit meh?

If I texture a complex object, I first prepare masks for assigning textures for each material or part (I render them by assigning basic colors). Also I draw any bump details first. And then I assign base materials (wood, metal etc) based on those masks. Then I use the workflow this plugin essentially does, extracting different effects from ambient occlusion, bump details and also masks. I also render AO as a lightmap and for other stuff, as this is still a way to go with game texturing.
Then I make tear-wear, and it's all on different layers.
Usually one texture consists of hundreds of layers for each material (diffuse, bump, specular). I almost never use scratches painted into single diffuse or any other tear-wear effects, and always add them on top on other layers. As I'll have to make bump and specular from those, and also other textures.
This is one diffuse texture (a bit chaotic with naming, but that's fine for this project).
 
Old 01 January 2013   #18
Originally Posted by leigh: Am I the only one who finds that example a bit meh?


No you are not. When I clicked it, I was surprised NOT be stunned, there are better examples, many of them on here !
 
Old 01 January 2013   #19
Originally Posted by leigh: Am I the only one who finds that example a bit meh?


No. I would advise everybody to never texture a gun like that. There is nothing realistic about it. It looks like a old die cast toy.
 
Old 01 January 2013   #20
Originally Posted by Pyke: .....The actual texture on the gun seems pretty simple. Its the weathering on the edges that's making it look extra special. That and the spec map on the metal.


Yes it's the attention to little details that make this stand out.
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Old 01 January 2013   #21
personally I think the example is very bad....

I can see stretched UV's, a blurred base, a scope thats a base colour (no texture map) and scratches that are highly un-motivated.
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Old 01 January 2013   #22
The same way you get good at anything, practice, experience, and a bit of talent
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Old 01 January 2013   #23
Originally Posted by leigh: Am I the only one who finds that example a bit meh?

No. I honestly don't think much, if any, texture painting was done on that gun. It looks to be mostly masking cavity areas and adding grunge photos on top. Looks alright, but it could be better.

If it's video game texturing techniques you're after, I'd recommend Eat3D's Next-Gen texturing techniques. What the guy illustrates there is pretty much how video game texturing is done by most pros.
 
Old 01 January 2013   #24
Originally Posted by Pyke: Honestly, I think that you need to focus on your modeling before going into texturing.





Your model may be good for say an iPhone game, but then your texturing would be rather different-and Im assuming you are aiming for a high end low poly model.


havent done a model in 4 years or so but its key to having a great UV setup to unwrap. The top of the gun should be all quads, that alone would help tremendously when texturing and not having to deal with mis-alignments and weird stretching, especially around corners.
 
Old 01 January 2013   #25
Originally Posted by leigh: Am I the only one who finds that example a bit meh?


I also thought that. Yes definitely agree that texturing itself is a specialization because there are many techniques to achieve different details, styles... and in regards to the example posted I wanted to add, that texturing for videogames is not the same than texturing for film/vfx.

The example shown, looks like a video game model. When I started texturing, I did it with videogame props, because that is what I learn t first, so I was very used to bake my lighting and shadow (ao) inside my diffuse maps (in film there is no ao on color maps, might be a bit to accentuate something or as a mask for dirt...etc, but definitely not as video games textures)
ao is calculated at the time of rendering and composed on top...*

*and with renderers like arnold, there is no need to ao per say...still a lot of people use ao with brute force render engines...

I realized that in general, video game textures look "punchy" if I can use the term, but in contrast a lot of times I find them over saturated, over dirty and simply too much!! (being doing this myself for a while!)

in vfx I learnt to decompose materials in regards to shading (surfacing). And that was key for me. A lot of times for generic stuff I can get away with generic texture maps, well used in a smart shading network.. I find that efficient, combined sometimes with procedural maps from the render engine itself... its a case per case.... sure there are hero assets/ characters that need dedicated texture love.

A model well textured and wrongly shaded looks bad and not believable. For me its really a mix of both texturing and shading... I know there are specializations for both, but communication between the two parts is really important... 3d models in film sometimes look les impressive than videogames, but more believeable, because in real life there is no ultra contrasted, bloom outlined, strong shadowed objects all around...is mostly a video game trend to do it that way.

Also textures in vfx are a lot of times enhanced in compositing...

looking at http://quixel.se/ddo/ I can recall what I ve said above about textures. Although textures look "nice" in a video game perspective, imo they are too saturated and simply over the top... but well thats my opinion!

cheers
 
Old 01 January 2013   #26
Originally Posted by evolucian: The top of the gun should be all quads, that alone would help tremendously when texturing and not having to deal with mis-alignments and weird stretching, especially around corners.

I agree the topology of the gun is poor for a videogame. Long thin triangles are no-no for game engines. Also some topology looks strange (but hard to judge from this screenshot). So ironically both texturing and this model examples are not quite good.
 
Old 01 January 2013   #27
Originally Posted by icantthinkofaname: How do people get textures this good?


How on earth is this texturing example impressive?
 
Old 01 January 2013   #28
Originally Posted by leigh: Am I the only one who finds that example a bit meh?

I thought it was pretty crap too. It looks like someone read a tutorial on how to do weathering and using some filters and procs to do low frequency variance, and then had a go at it with a decent understanding of the process but absolutely zero eye for interesting visuals.
That, or it was a rushed job by somebody with decent mastery of the tools and process.

If the question is how to obtain the OP's screenshot (and I assume we're talking about the weapon, because the wall and the ground are downright appalling), I'd say all you need is read some tutorials and practice for a few weeks.

My idea of good weapon textures greatly differs. Killzone 2 and 3 have some great, carefully crafted weathering that has some logic to it.
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Old 01 January 2013   #29
Originally Posted by Laa-Yosh: Weathering should always be hand painted and tell a story about the object.
That procedural tool isn't bad but it's still artificial and looks inferior to hand painted stuff.


I know what you mean.. Our own testing verdict was: "Good for starting point only. Details after should be done by hand."
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Old 01 January 2013   #30
Also colors... materials.... Make a BIG difference to weapons. And for these you can avoid resorting to weathering effects by just following the "quirks" of the various metal laminations used in guns.

Let me post an excerpt from our own weapons research for REVERSION:

Originally Posted by VFX Meeting Excerpt: I think a large part of our pistol looking more "businesslike" is to
factor in some of the shades from real life pistol coating finishes.

There are three popular finishes which are illustrated in the attached
images. These coatings are a bit like laminations so they can alter
a bit how light penetrates and shines on pistols:

One is called Bruniton finish which is very blackest-black but with
high-gloss areas. It looks laminated and allows for some edges even
on undersides to have a shine to them.

A second one is called Blued Finish which is very popular for
corrosion control and tends to look bluish under bright light or
near-black with bluish speculars in dim light.

The last is InOxidated finish aka: InOX. This is what frequently is
referred to as "Stainless finish". It tends to look like Matte Silver
and doesn't have as much shine as the wax-like Bruniton finish.
I think properly tinkering with Shaders for the pistol can improve the
weapon's on-screen impact and will increase the feeling of
authenticity.

Also you must know that in real life, you can mix up the finishes as
these usually only alter the amount of lubrication applied for parts.
For example, some people use a Blued Slide with an InOX barrel on
their pistols.


Note: We tried to emulate Blued for the weapons in REVERSION.

As my friend at ILM Singapore always says. "Always Have Reference."
That I believe, is the final secret to getting weapons right:

Bruniton Finish Sample:


Blued Finish Sample:


In-Oxidated Finish Sample:
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