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Old 12-31-2012, 09:02 PM   #1
Ethervoid
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Any recommended linux distro?

Hi, im noticing a lot job ads ask for linux knowledge as a plus (2d or 3d), so i'm thinking about starting to have some practice with it so i can add it to my resume. I know there are lots of distros out there, so i was wondering if there is any preferred one by the industry to run Maya, Nuke etc.

And Happy New Year everyone!
 
Old 12-31-2012, 09:09 PM   #2
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I use CentOS 6.3. It's a Redhat based distro which is best for Maya and Nuke. It's a lot more of a pain in the ass to get Maya running on Debian based distros like Ubuntu and I have had mixed luck with Fedora. You don't even have to install additional dependencies for Maya to run in CentOS. It's about as idiot proof as it gets for Linux
 
Old 01-01-2013, 09:02 PM   #3
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I found this useful for installing maya on CentOS

http://rajivpandit.wordpress.com/20...-in-centos-6-3/
 
Old 01-01-2013, 09:46 PM   #4
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I use Mint

b
 
Old 01-01-2013, 11:49 PM   #5
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The level of proficiency required or desired varies studio to studio, but in general the linux specific side of it is just some very minimal knowledge to be able to operate from a shell.
Basic file tree navigation, setting environments, running scripts, a basic undestanding of things such as environment variables, and so on.

There is absolutely nothing in nuke or maya that looks, feels or behaves differently enough between linux or windows that you would need to have a full install and operate those softwares in a linux environments to be prepared for work in a unix based pipeline. At absolute worst some minor bugs or cosmetic differences are variant between platforms (from a user point of view), and things like the file dialogues some times, that's it.

All the knowledge you need can be obtained and trained off a live CD (a bootable unix CD) and a couple websites or books, you need nothing more, nor, unless so inclined, should you bother with more.

This changes if you are applying for a more technical position, as when things like the file system, the network, and the pipeline glue that's purely systems related come into play the differences are considerable, and stepping it up one notch again when you start doing development the comfort zone moves again (gcc + make vs pre-canned visual studio and so on), but it doesn't sound like this is what you're talking about.

Download a fedora or cent-os, or even both, live CDs, and play around while reading some introduction to linux websites and be done with it. It'll be all you'll need, and a lot less hassle than having to install a full, HDD booting distro and related pieces of software.
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Old 01-02-2013, 01:55 AM   #6
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with the direction Windows is going, I wouldn't be surprised if linux picks up a lot more momentum in the next couple years until Windows 9 gets its act together.

I recently set up our renderfarm to run on linux and am impressed in many respects by it despite that sometimes simple things can end up being overly complicated to set up in the name of flexibility.
 
Old 01-02-2013, 06:43 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sentry66
with the direction Windows is going, I wouldn't be surprised if linux picks up a lot more momentum in the next couple years until Windows 9 gets its act together.

I recently set up our renderfarm to run on linux and am impressed in many respects by it despite that sometimes simple things can end up being overly complicated to set up in the name of flexibility.


As much as I like Windows 8, the sad reality is that it is a complete failure. I've read that its adoption rate is worse than that of Vista. I also hear that for some businesses, the re-training effort to get used to Windows 8 is on par - or worse - than the effort needed to get used to Linux. At least one commenter on the internet reports that his business is ditching Windows for Linux at the end of Windows 7s support life.
 
Old 01-02-2013, 07:13 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sentry66
with the direction Windows is going, I wouldn't be surprised if linux picks up a lot more momentum in the next couple years until Windows 9 gets its act together.

I recently set up our renderfarm to run on linux and am impressed in many respects by it despite that sometimes simple things can end up being overly complicated to set up in the name of flexibility.


ya, have you tried configuring Wacom tablets in Linux? Holy shit, what a mess. I like Linux for being fast, cheap and Unix but man, some of this stuff is still terrible.

I'll avoid the flame war bait since I'm already known not to be a fan of Windows
 
Old 01-02-2013, 09:02 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgbeige
ya, have you tried configuring Wacom tablets in Linux? Holy shit, what a mess. I like Linux for being fast, cheap and Unix but man, some of this stuff is still terrible.

I'll avoid the flame war bait since I'm already known not to be a fan of Windows


yeah I wouldn't rely on linux if I needed to run Zbrush, photoshop, cinema 4D, or any specialty hardware that didn't have official company linux driver support - unless I happened to know how to program drivers.

Wacom doesn't program drivers for linux.
On their site they say:
Quote:
There is an open source 3rd party driver for Linux that supports Intuos2, Graphire2, Graphire3 and Cintiq as well as older Wacom tablets. Wacom is supporting the development of this driver by providing the programmers with necessary information and sample tablets for testing. Wacom does not control the development of the drivers, and Wacom is not responsible for any quality or performance issues or any potential harm that might occur by using one of these drivers. All support questions or problem reports should be directed to the independent programmers.

This site contains the most up-to-date Linux drivers and information and a mailing list that you can post questions to.





I was impressed that installing linux was super quick and detected all my hardware. Windows takes forever to install and won't detect half or sometimes any of the hardware on my motherboards - which is especially annoying when it won't at least install a basic ethernet driver so I can get online and download the drivers. Any current Live DVD of linux you download is going to have bleeding edge current drivers for hardware and detect almost everything while a Windows install is only as current as when the last service pack DVD came out.

I wasn't impressed trying to learn Samba or fstab and sifting through massive text files everywhere to get some basic functions to work such as networking with windows PC's. From what I've seen, I think Ubuntu and others might be better out of the box at integrated Windows networking within the UI than manually configuring a Samba text file in CentOS.

I am impressed at launching a terminal and typing "yum install _____" and it'll just install, without having to hunt the program down for your specific OS or hardware. It already knows what you need, installs it, and just works.

My main complaint about linux is how difficult it is to find answers for your specific version of linux. You'll commonly end up trying 15 things before you find a solution that works for your specific version of linux.

Last edited by sentry66 : 01-02-2013 at 09:35 PM.
 
Old 01-02-2013, 09:19 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgbeige
ya, have you tried configuring Wacom tablets in Linux? Holy shit, what a mess. I like Linux for being fast, cheap and Unix but man, some of this stuff is still terrible.

I'll avoid the flame war bait since I'm already known not to be a fan of Windows


I use CentOS 6.3 and I have this installed



Code:
su -c "yum install wacomcpl"


I'm not a big fan of Windows, but now it's been so long since I've used it that I shouldn't really comment on it. I tend to give it a try when they release something new. I tried Vista and Win7, but it didn't really fit my needs. I think I will test Win8 at all as it looks more like a toy Might be great, but doesn't really fit my needs.

Anyhow. I would recommend that you test CentOS, most studios seems to adopt it and leaving the fedora train.

[EDIT]
Here is my post install document for CentOS 6.3
https://dl.dropbox.com/u/6697097/CentosPostInstall.txt
[-EDIT]

regards
stefan andersson

Last edited by StefanA : 01-02-2013 at 09:32 PM.
 
Old 01-02-2013, 09:24 PM   #11
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Probably the best distribution for learning Linux is OS X. The shell in OS X is nearly indistinguishable from Linux. Add MacPorts to the mix and you'll even have a decent package manager for all the open source goodness you'll ever need.
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Old 01-03-2013, 12:31 AM   #12
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If you just want to learn, I would suggest Fedora over Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) or Centos. Fedora is where most of the new development goes that ends up in Red Hat and Centos.

Stay away from Debian variants, that includes Mint, Ubuntu etc. For what you want now it's not worth it.

You will find the differences in Centos/RHEL and Fedora minimal, but you will have less things to fiddle with in Fedora, more of your hardware will work out of the box. The techniques used to install things like Nuke, Houdini etc will be the same on just about EVERY Linux Distribution.

Fedora...less hassle, for the same result.

I don't want to delve too deep into an example, but I can gaurantee you will not want to be messing with assignment rules and profiles on your network adapters. That's for sysadmins to be bothered with.

Check out Fedora and Centos in Virtualbox before you install to physical hardware.

P.S. Steam runs great on Fedora as well as Ubuntu.
 
Old 01-03-2013, 12:42 AM   #13
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@Dave Girard modern pcs + modern wacoms running on recent distros are much easier to get working (eg Ubuntu 12.04?)

@ShaderOp sorry I disagree. Learning MacOS is no way to learn Linux.

From personal experience get a reasonably powerful PC with an Nvidia graphics card and install Ubuntu or Fedora to the hard disk. Centos can be a bit tricky to install.

If your scared of dual booting (partitioning etc) just get a second hard disk and swap cables over at boot time. Better than wiping precious data
 
Old 01-03-2013, 01:15 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgbeige
ya, have you tried configuring Wacom tablets in Linux? Holy shit, what a mess. I like Linux for being fast, cheap and Unix but man, some of this stuff is still terrible.

I'll avoid the flame war bait since I'm already known not to be a fan of Windows


Concept artists in my studio also couldn't stand GIMP nor any variation of them.
 
Old 01-03-2013, 02:01 PM   #15
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If you go with Centos, Stella will help for a better user friendly desktop experience.
Give it a try.
Iso and Live CD at
http://li.nux.ro/stella/

Distro review here
http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/stella-linux.html
 
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