U.S. Lawmakers want "Psychological Impact of Violent Video Games on Youth" studied

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Old 12 December 2012   #31
Originally Posted by earwax69: I agree that videogames have no bearing whatsoever on most people mind. I didn't feel the slightest difference after playing days of Crysis. There's lot of more obvious causes; Alcohol consumption, depression, temporary psychosis, hormonal changes, extreme frustration, sheer imbecility and so on. I does not take much to push a depressed man to suicidal behaviors. It also does not take much cerebral power to understand that a kitchen knive will lead to a very different outcome than a machine gun.

As far as media/games go, I think MTV is a lot more to blame than video games for gun violence in the US. Thug life, yeah right.


What has not been mentioned in all this is the important role of family and parenting.

Adam Lanza, in particular, was dealt a short hand on parenting side with a divorce and a Doomsday Prepping mother.

Like many, I've played the most violent video games, I also managed to see films like "Robocop", "Death Wish", and "Rolling Thunder" well before I was 18.

I must say my family structure and parenting played a big role in me not becoming wayward or violent.

It's true that when you're older, you can think for yourself and choose to ignore them, but what they ingrain in you very early really helps you when dealing with outside influences whether they are films, games, or especially other people.
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Old 12 December 2012   #32
Playing such video games is a result of a problem - not a cause...
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Old 12 December 2012   #33
The desire of an individual to spend vast amounts of time re-enacting gruesome ways to kill/murder living beings in ever more realistic ways has always struck me as rather bizarre. Watching something like the Connecticut drama unfold on TV, then casually switching the TV input over for a session of GTA, Manhunt, etc. is incomprehensible to me. I don't know how people get pleasure out of that.
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Old 12 December 2012   #34
I am Anti-Game, in some circumstances.

Speaking to my grandfather, him talking about the war, and where he literally and actually saw is friends blown to pieces in front of his eyes, made him and me cry.

I do object to making games of real wars or conflicts, because it's to easy to 'disassociate' what your playing from the 'real thing', which you'll never experience. In the experience after talking to him I realized, that something is gained yet much is lost in the man - and his soul.

I wonder too, for this individual who shot all of the children, how disassociated he'd become. I wonder too if that realization is the reason why so many take their own lives at the end.
 
Old 12 December 2012   #35
Originally Posted by cojam: I do object to making games of real wars or conflicts, because it's to easy to 'disassociate' what your playing from the 'real thing', which you'll never experience. In the experience after talking to him I realized, that something is gained yet much is lost in the man - and his soul.


I disagree with this. I really don't like the idea that certain events are taboo when it comes to being depicted in entertainment - imagine if people felt this way about films, we wouldn't have all the amazing war films that we do. I also believe the opposite of your feeling that games disconnect the viewer/player from the event; on the contrary I think it can potentially show people the horror that real soldiers endure by placing them in a simulation of combat. Just as the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan showed viewers the harrowing chaos, tragedy and personal loss of the D-Day beach landings in a very intimate and horrifying way, so too can games. The only difference is that a game places you in the middle of the events so that you have a participatory role in the story, but that story, like a film, is always pre-determined. As such, I see games as an important and exciting storytelling medium.

I think it's a good thing that most people playing these games will never experience the real thing, but I also think it's a good thing to remind people of what others do indeed go through, or have gone through in the past.
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Old 12 December 2012   #36
They are looking for a scapegoat on this. Guns and ammo alone in the US are a 12 billion dollar a year enterprise (you can look that up). I dont have the exact number for the gaming industry (in the US and not international) but i am sure it is far less. So in order to desaturate the dangers of owning a gun and not killing such a vast market they target video games. I like to interject on that and say "what about youtube" i am sure if i search for it i can find out how to ACTUALLY use a rifle or make a bomb in the PHYSICAL world...i dont think COD can teach me that at all....other than getting owned by people far younger than me
It is just stupid and despite all these kids dying for nothing and the families having to grasp with the loss, in the end it all comes down to which industry does america want to spit on in the aftermath to make everyone happy...the one making an exuberant amount of money or one that is more than likely a fraction of it and from i can tell has no real significant impact on an individual's mental stability. I dont think it is the us senators themselves wanting to target the entertainment industry solely they are just listening to the mob mentality that want to blame somebody but at the same time keep their guns...these people will not bother researching the affects of video games or movies...they just want retribution anyway they can get it. I always say this...when it comes to a mob mentality the collective IQ drops to nil...everytime.

Just my two cents...wish i could put it down better like most of the posters here...you all are always great for a debate and it is awesome being part of a forum that has intelligent users
 
Old 12 December 2012   #37
Originally Posted by b1m2x3: They play the same video games in other countries...
But most other countries don't seem to have this problem.


That may be because most of them don't allow gun ownership as a constitutional right to all their citizens. If they did, I'd say similar tragedies like Sandy Hook would happen everywhere.
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Old 12 December 2012   #38
Originally Posted by DutchDimension: The desire of an individual to spend vast amounts of time re-enacting gruesome ways to kill/murder living beings in ever more realistic ways has always struck me as rather bizarre. Watching something like the Connecticut drama unfold on TV, then casually switching the TV input over for a session of GTA, Manhunt, etc. is incomprehensible to me. I don't know how people get pleasure out of that.


It's a video game, and in no way resembles the real thing. Doesn't matter how realistic the graphics get, the player knows that the person on that screen is fake, just a collection of pixels, and that makes all the difference.

You take 99.9 % of people who play violent hack and slash or shoot 'em up games, put them in a real violent situation, and they aren't going to be any more desensitized or prepared than a non-gamer. I could see dozens of game characters shot and diced with swords and not care, but I see a bar fight break out and my heart starts racing. I'm not desensitized to violence, I'm desensitized to video game violence (to an extent, some things still make me cringe), and those are two very different things.

I find it odd that games get all this flak, yet physical contact sports like american football, rugby, or boxing are a-ok. Not saying those are bad either, just shows the bias so many people have. What's worse you think, cutting a cartoon in half and watching over the top blood spray out in a video game, or beating a real, living person's face over and over until they black out?
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Old 12 December 2012   #39
Originally Posted by Michael5188: You take 99.9 % of people who play violent hack and slash or shoot 'em up games, put them in a real violent situation, and they aren't going to be any more desensitized or prepared than a non-gamer.


I agree. Many of my friends play shooting and killing games, but in reality most of the same friends will run a mile from trouble, games don't make people braver or more aggressive in real life. I've seen it before when a big fight starts at the local roller disco or in school, playing shooting games doesn't make anyone grow a backbone or a pair of balls you know. Our brains remind us real quick what is real and what isn't.
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Old 12 December 2012   #40
Originally Posted by Dillster: That may be because most of them don't allow gun ownership as a constitutional right to all their citizens. If they did, I'd say similar tragedies like Sandy Hook would happen everywhere.


This isn't entirely true. The problem is far more complex than the availability of guns; America has long had a culture of violence, from its revolutionary beginnings through to modern day. This is the painful truth I alluded to in an earlier post; people accumulating private arsenals of assault weapons is a symptom of this culture, not a root of it. Since the Cold War, a hefty dose of paranoia has been added into the mix too; while it's certainly true that this doesn't apply to the majority of Americans, there is nevertheless a large demographic in the US population that buy into the often jingoistic paranoia spread by certain media outlets, and when you combine this with a surrounding climate of violence (criminality, the ridiculous, doomed "war on drugs", involvement in various conflicts worldwide, etc), you end up with a volatile cocktail, especially when you factor in additional social problems like class disparity, religious extremism and a lack of proper care for the mentally ill, among others.

The fact that shortly after the shootings there were people on Twitter posting about how they believed the massacre was a false flag operation by the government in order to bring about new gun legislation demonstrates the insane paranoia of this particular demographic of the population, and this level of paranoia leads to all manner of social dysfunction. You don't treat this issue with legislation, because it's far too complex and deeply-rooted.
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Old 12 December 2012   #41
Originally Posted by leigh: This isn't entirely true. The problem is far more complex than the availability of guns.....


Yes I think thats true also. My Dad and me holidayed in different parts of America 4 out of the last 5 years, it was arranged by the bikers on my Dads Goldwing forum. In Colorado in 2009 and Georgia last year, I was lucky enough to be brought out target shooting by some of the locals, and I really enjoyed it.
The thing is, I seen for myself that the men I met who were gun owners, really took pride in the fact. All these men were responsible citizens, worked and had children, they just happened to own guns too. guns were part of their lives, even socially, it's a cultural thing. All of this is part of what makes the situation complex, I mean how can you work out who is a responsible citizen and who is a simmering under the surface time bomb waiting for the right set of circumstances to set him off?
It's just unfortunate that attention gets diverted to games, and probably movies too as part of the cause. All those little angels in Sandy Hook weren't killed by a game pad, they were killed by guns in the hands of a loony.
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Old 12 December 2012   #42
I remember that conversation Leigh. I don't think it proves you are right. I live in this country, I know first hand that we arn't paranoid and fearful of the world around us. I know from others that the rest of the world isn't exactly happy-go-lucky and care free.

Understand that insane people are everywhere - the fundamental framework of our society did not make this man go crazy. We simply neglected him. We gave him pills and sent him on his way. It is a fact that there are disturbed or undiagnosed people in other countries that, if given the opportunity, would eventually do the same thing.
 
Old 12 December 2012   #43
Originally Posted by trancerobot: I remember that conversation Leigh. I don't think it proves you are right. I live in this country, I know first hand that we arn't paranoid and fearful of the world around us. I know from others that the rest of the world isn't exactly happy-go-lucky and care free.


Sigh. Please read my post carefully. I did not say the entire US population is paranoid. Are you honestly going to sit there and deny the existence of Fox News-watching survivalists in the US? They're obviously the very extreme edge of this, but such an extreme is symptomatic of issues in society as a whole. Remember, I'm not just some hater sitting on the other side of the Atlantic hurling barbs at a country I know nothing about; I lived in America for some time. Furthermore, these issues are very well documented.

Here's one: http://edition.cnn.com/2012/11/04/p...dter/index.html

There are thousands more articles and essays like it. I absolutely cannot understand how you can sit there and deny that US culture has a strong vein of paranoia running through it. I seem to recall saying this before to you, but I'll repeat it: I'm very well travelled, and the US is by far the most paranoid place I've ever been, starting right from the treatment you receive at the airport on arrival.

By denying this issue, you're kinda contributing to it :/
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Old 12 December 2012   #44
Originally Posted by DuttyFoot: ...until her son does something violent. She found out her adopted son had mental issues and tried to get him help and that was the response she was given....


this is the truth, seen if first hand.

its' pathetic, and this country continues to ignore the real problems and paints everything over with some other agenda... completely insanity here.
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Old 12 December 2012   #45
Originally Posted by tswalk: this is the truth, seen if first hand.

its' pathetic, and this country continues to ignore the real problems and paints everything over with some other agenda... completely insanity here.


Well that's because scapegoating is easier and quells public outrage and moral panic in the short term.
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