A student with questions about breaking into the industry.

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Old 12 December 2012   #1
A student with questions about breaking into the industry.

Hello
I'm a Sophomore in college and I have a good bit of experience animating with both 3ds max and Maya. I am by no means a master of either program but I'm working on it, and I've begun thinking about what I'm going to do after I graduate.

My question is, what can I do to get my name out in the field? (other than build a solid resume, portfolio, and demo reel)
 
Old 12 December 2012   #2
Originally Posted by SuddenGambit: My question is, what can I do to get my name out in the field? (other than build a solid resume, portfolio, and demo reel)



Bingo. There is no other way. Just work hard, get good, showcase your work, meet people and thats all you can do.

Oh, and a good dose of luck wont hurt either.

Good luck
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Old 12 December 2012   #3
If you don't have a solid resume, portfolio, and demo reel, what exactly is the point of "getting your name out in the field?" No one cares who you are unless you can help them in some way that's advantageous to both of you.
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Old 12 December 2012   #4
Creating up to standard work for you porfolio or reel is the only way, as that's what the studio looks at to judge how good you are and see what skills you have to offer. The best way is to get your finished work seen by posting on forums, uploading to websites such as vimeo and etc. Of course also apply to studios with a finished reel.

You can also post WIP in the forums to get critiques, to make you work better and porfolio ready. You might want to blog about your WIP progress.

If you are at a point, where you are confident with your skills, you might want to enter competitions that many 3D forums hold.

You got to create up to standard 3D and be creative to get noticed.
 
Old 12 December 2012   #5
Wink

here are two links

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthr...t=demo+reel+job

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthr...p?f=2&t=1080428

Hope this help.
 
Old 12 December 2012   #6
Be active on CGTalk. Be active on mailing lists. Be active on other forums.

The one person most likely to get you a job is someone you know--even if it's online. You can get a great feel for someone's competency and knowledge through a web forum. If they always have a good attitude, helpful insights and mastery of the software then when you look at their demo reel you can be confident that they aren't bullshitting their reel.

And friends hire friends. You can call it nepotism but it's also trust. If it's just some stranger whose work you've never seen you have no idea how fast they are, what they are like to work with or whether or not they ripped off their reel. If it's someone you know then you've seen them work and presumably if you're recommending them then they're someone you know does great work.

And if you are new without a lot lot of experience knowing someone is usually the difference between "their reel sucks" and "their reel sucks but they're a fast learner and really eager to get better--I think we should give them a chance".

The most important thing for a student breaking into the industry though is talent. Most of the people I saw out of school who failed to find employment had a lack of talent or demonstrable talent. Your reel is key. Your reel is more important than your diploma. You spent perhaps $80k on your diploma. Spend $10k if necessary to build shots for your reel. Find a real production company or someone with a Cinematography reel that's pro-level and hire them for 3 days to shoot some basic plates. Then create a kickass reel. Shamelessly rip off concepts from feature films and TV. People aren't looking for creativity in concept for artist they're looking to see that you can deliver quality.
 
Old 12 December 2012   #7
Oh I'm also going to add one more huge piece of advice. If simply being employed if your goal, ask around for what's in demand. There is usually a skillset that people are desperate for. For instance if you're a talented Houdini technical artist I think you'll see perpetual employment at the moment.

Learn what's in demand. People's standards will be lowered if they can't fill a certain number of positions.

Rumor had it a couple years back during the production for '2012' that every single 3ds Max FumeFX artist in LA was booked.
 
Old 12 December 2012   #8
That's what I keep telling people. If you want a job, you need skills that are wanted by studios. I know people who are generalists who are struggling to find work and feel that they are entitled to a job. "I can light, render, model..." etc etc. The problem is that there are hundreds, if not thousands of people coming out of university every year who can do that stuff and can do it cheaper. "But I'm an artist, I don't know any of that technical stuff". Well stop moaning that you can't get a job. Just because someone knows how to model/light/shade doesn't mean they are guaranteed a job. Stand out and be unique. its the only way to make yourself employable.
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Old 12 December 2012   #9
I am also a student, attending the University of Texas at Dallas. Our professors preach for us to constantly network and focus on the quality of our work. We're told that studios would rather see 3 really high quality peices of work in 1 min than a 10 min reel filled with medium quality. I myself am more so on the technical side of the industry (rigging and vfx) so I spend a lot of time focusing on my programming and practicing rigging different types of models. I also do my best to see what other work is being done out there and see how it is being done. If I want a job working for a studio, I figure I need to start understanding how things are being done. I also understand that some of my skills can translate to jobs outside of the film industry, so i always try to keep my ears open for jobs in other fields. I look forward to reading this forum and participating in the discussions.
 
Old 12 December 2012   #10
Originally Posted by danmarell: That's what I keep telling people. If you want a job, you need skills that are wanted by studios. I know people who are generalists who are struggling to find work and feel that they are entitled to a job. "I can light, render, model..." etc etc. The problem is that there are hundreds, if not thousands of people coming out of university every year who can do that stuff and can do it cheaper. "But I'm an artist, I don't know any of that technical stuff". Well stop moaning that you can't get a job. Just because someone knows how to model/light/shade doesn't mean they are guaranteed a job. Stand out and be unique. its the only way to make yourself employable.


Slightly OT here, but I'd be very interested to know what you and others in the industry consider to be in demand Could you give some examples? I think this would be very useful for the OP, and anyone trying to get a job.
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- Jesus
 
Old 12 December 2012   #11
Just search studio websites and look to see what jobs they are posting. They are usually technical roles. Shader writers, FX TDs, pipeline developers, software engineers, python scriptin etc. "But I can model a scantily clad female warrior with huge cleavage!" says student number 584.
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Old 12 December 2012   #12
Go to conferences (SIGGRAPH, CTN, VES, etc...)

and luck is going to play its fair share...
 
Old 12 December 2012   #13
Generalists jobs are still very much in demand in the TV/web video field. You have to be good to compete to be fair, but there is still alot of work out there. When i was freelancing (for 8 years) i hardly had a day off and now that im with a studio, we have a LOT of trouble finding good freelancers who are free. Everyone seems to be busy.I cant speak for the film industry though, i only work in commercials.

Realflow/fluid work will always be in high demand too. But for the love of god, dont call yourself a "realflow expert" unless you actually are. When we were looking for someone to help me with a complicated fluid shot, we got so many applicants who had clearly never opened the program. One guy wanted us to pay him 500/day and had ONE fluid shot in his mediocre reel and that shot was of a simple emitter hitting a floor....
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Old 12 December 2012   #14
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