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  10 October 2012
Originally Posted by DSW: Nope, that's this year - Dec. 21, 2012 - didn't you see the movie?


Yeah your right. I'll have to set my alarm.
I'd hate to sleep through the end of the world......again.
 
  10 October 2012
Originally Posted by DushyantArT: after reading these threads and people saying. I always think, is Cg industry dying a slow death??...:(( I Donn even get started yet...and this is my passion.

It's not dying a slow death, it's growing every year, just it changes, and not everybody changes with it.
Much like webdesign, it used to be something where with little knowledge, but the right timing and location, you could make good money in no time.

These days, again much like webdesign, it's not so exotic anymore than any JD can come into it and make a few grands every week or get a staff position without being particularly good at their work and standing out of the crowd, because it's been commoditised, and much more throughput is expected for the same or less money.

For it to be dying there'd need to be a trend where CGI is less used, across less fields, by less people. The opposite is true. Just it's not in a bubble anymore, and the elite and challenging parts of it have moved a lot further up in skill and network requirments.

It's also now something commoditised enough to be outsourced, split, crowdsourced, and that can be obtained (with a quality bias) at many different levels for many different budgets. This means it's now having to respond to the global market, and that doesn't sit well with most.

It's nothing different from what happened to a large number of service industries with no particular real estate requirments.
IT consulting, client service, many forms and types of dev work have all been through the same booms, bubbles, falls, and finally averaging that this industry is going through, and they all exist and are now flatter and more common forms of employment at different levels.

You didn't suddenly stop seeing new websites after the dotcom crack that followed the boom, did you? CGI is no different.
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Last edited by ThE_JacO : 10 October 2012 at 03:52 AM.
 
  10 October 2012
Raffaele is correct in my view.

And this commoditizing or flattening does present opportunities as it does threats. It's with the current state of affairs for example that Blur is finally pushing to fund and produce its own film even without major studio backing or having to pander to "mass market appeal".

What needs to be added though is not all change is casualty-free. As Allan Greenspan likes to point out once in a while: "Not all of us are meant to survive market changes."

But in an industry that is known for normally shedding and re-hiring between projects, I think we have to be very careful about how we read and react to news like what happened at DNEG.

We have to be discerning and see if there are factors separating it from what happened at DD.

In this country, we recently had an issue where car modifiers railed online on FB and twitter against a new law about modifying car lamps and exhausts - only to find out later the law was actually directed at motorcycles. It was pretty ridiculous. And now their ID's are all over FB and Twitter as testimony to how they "jumped the gun".

Everybody just calm down - and poke through the details first.
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Last edited by CGIPadawan : 10 October 2012 at 04:29 AM.
 
  10 October 2012
Originally Posted by ThE_JacO: It's not dying a slow death, it's growing every year, just it changes, and not everybody changes with it.
Much like webdesign, it used to be something where with little knowledge, but the right timing and location, you could make good money in no time.

These days, again much like webdesign, it's not so exotic anymore than any JD can come into it and make a few grands every week or get a staff position without being particularly good at their work and standing out of the crowd, because it's been commoditised, and much more throughput is expected for the same or less money.

For it to be dying there'd need to be a trend where CGI is less used, across less fields, by less people. The opposite is true. Just it's not in a bubble anymore, and the elite and challenging parts of it have moved a lot further up in skill and network requirments.

It's also now something commoditised enough to be outsourced, split, crowdsourced, and that can be obtained (with a quality bias) at many different levels for many different budgets. This means it's now having to respond to the global market, and that doesn't sit well with most.

It's nothing different from what happened to a large number of service industries with no particular real estate requirments.
IT consulting, client service, many forms and types of dev work have all been through the same booms, bubbles, falls, and finally averaging that this industry is going through, and they all exist and are now flatter and more common forms of employment at different levels.

You didn't suddenly stop seeing new websites after the dotcom crack that followed the boom, did you? CGI is no different.




That was worth reading. Thank Raffaele..

You know when these type of news comes in i can't sleep nicely just because thinking that is this the right career i choose ..I love doing it but still.

may be its about accepting changes and doing things according to the situations.
 
  10 October 2012
Well I think there will always be strong demand for the work, just the structure of which it is presented may shift and change with time. I am still just barely starting out in the field though not afraid to remain confident in my decision. Communication is a key aspect of our lives and visual mediums are an essential portion of that so we will always be able to find purpose even if we have to dig or move out of our comfort zones from time to time. I come from a fairly small city and always know that if I were to go back there and start a small advertising studio and apply my skill set I could take advantage of a very unsaturated market with probably little to no competition. The thing is that I prefer the busy crazy large scale idea of teams producing immense work together. I don't know if I will fall into place at a large studio someday or drift into free lancing, all I do know is that even though the industry has it's trembles here and there the community around it will always push on.
 
  10 October 2012
Originally Posted by DushyantArT: after reading these threads and people saying. I always think, is Cg industry dying a slow death??...:(( I Donn even get started yet...and this is my passion.


As others have said, it's not dying. Layoffs tend to come in big chunks that make the news, while new hires tend to happen a steady trickle, and you thus don't hear about them.
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  10 October 2012
Hey Leigh; If your thinking about photography. Try wedding photography. Although not "sexy", once your established, the pay in large cities easily compares to any lead cg role. Sounds too good to be true, ehh; Check out some of the rates of established wedding photographers. So there is hope to your exit strategy.
 
  10 October 2012
Originally Posted by stevopolis: Hey Leigh; If your thinking about photography. Try wedding photography. Although not "sexy", once your established, the pay in large cities easily compares to any lead cg role. Sounds too good to be true, ehh; Check out some of the rates of established wedding photographers. So there is hope to your exit strategy.


Cheers for the suggestion, but it's actually something I've already decided to avoid, haha! I know it can be lucrative but wedding photography is insanely competitive and extremely stressful. And this may sound odd, but the formality of it is really off putting. I am a really casual person, I only own hoodies and jeans because I hate dressing smartly, and my personality is the same - I'm very laid back and easygoing, while wedding photography requires you to be very smart and formal. Sorry to shoot down your idea in flames like this, but yeah, heh, I'd be a square peg trying to fit in a round hole, and my heart wouldn't be in it. I'm at a point in my life where I don't want to do things that I don't have a passion for, as I feel I would never really be giving my best.

I'm trying to see if I can find a niche in the music photography business but it's pretty tough. I live for music, so combining my love of it with my love of photography comes naturally and it's obviously something I'm therefore really passionate about. But it's also very competitive, especially in a city like London where there are already loads of people with way better portfolios than mine. Still, you've got to start somewhere.

Failing that, I could always try to get into the other career I always figured I'd get into if I didn't get into digital art - tattooing. I've been learning how to use a tattoo machine and I still have a looooong way to go before I'd be good enough to work on real skin, but who knows?

Or as a very last and desperate resort I could become a busker with my banjo. I can do a half decent Cripple Creek.
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  10 October 2012
Originally Posted by stevopolis: ...the pay in large cities easily compares to any lead cg role. Sounds too good to be true, ehh; Check out some of the rates of established wedding photographers. So there is hope to your exit strategy.

As Leigh mentioned they key there is stress. For each gig you are expected to perform, your equipment is expected to perform, and your results have to be consistent. You are being paid the (relatively) big bucks for guaranteeing that someone's "day of their life" looks flawless. That means back ups of everything- media, cameras, lenses, storage. All that equipment can be very expensive (prone to theft, so insured too probably) and heavy. On top of that you are supposed to be cheerful, engaging, and in control of every situation.

So, in short, it may pay as well as a senior VFX position but this is offset by many things and very few people can actually pull it off. Competition-wise, I think it is much easier to be a wedding photographer in a smaller city or an isolated wedding destination rather than a big city.
 
  10 October 2012
leigh : so you also affected is that rite? sorry to hear that, I myself just return from new zealand because over there alot of graduate cannot find job either, not even part time. when I came back to malaysia, i think my country starting to see themselve abit outdated so the industry here is making expectation higher, alot of fresh grad like me are getting rejected even when we submit our reel.

how bad is situation there at UK? i know some of my ex classmate searching job there but no luck
 
  10 October 2012
Originally Posted by leigh: I currently shoot gigs, you can see the link in my sig, but the pay is shit if you even get paid at all, and the work is sporadic)...


Start your own photography projects and build-up your own I.P. as a photographer, instead of counting on gigs tossed your way. Maybe you can shoot a series of really sexy men and put out a book? A racy title might help sell it.

"Hot Rods: erotic male photography by Leigh van der Byl"

And since you love metal and you love photography, maybe do a book called "The Faces of Metal" that collects all of your photography of metal bands--both in on stage and in private.

Last edited by Lunatique : 10 October 2012 at 10:37 AM.
 
  10 October 2012
Originally Posted by Lunatique: Start your own photography projects and build-up your own I.P. as a photographer, instead of counting on gigs tossed your way. Maybe you can shoot a series of really sexy men and put out a book? A racy title might help sell it.

"Hot Rods: erotic male photography by Leigh van der Byl"

And since you love metal and you love photography, maybe do a book called "The Faces of Metal" that collects all of your photography of metal bands--both in on stage and in private.


That's actually a pretty cool idea. You're absolutely right about starting my own projects, but it's something I struggle with. Perhaps I'm just in a bit of a slump right now, but I find it hard to come up with ideas sometimes. What I love about gigs is that you have these exhibitionists strutting about right in front of you. They want to be seen, and I love capturing that, although of course the constantly changing and unpredictable lighting plus unpredictable movements of e artists makes it quite challenging from a photographic perspective! But then I like that challenge, as it makes the successful shots more satisfying. I'd love to get into offstage photo shoots but that's an even tighter circle than gig pit shooting, and I think it's definitely something you need to pay your dues for before getting into. Slowly but surely, I'll work my way up there.
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  10 October 2012
Lunatique : hey long time! do you manage to receive my emails? i was wondering my gmail have something gone wrong, are you still at China?

leigh : i agree wit everyone, dun wait for opportunities, best way is pursue them haha , i like photography too, building my own folio of photos sometimes, I seen some of your photos at your website before hm have you tried panaramic before? it's relly interesting
 
  10 October 2012
Originally Posted by DutchDimension: If the work is bountiful and the studio considers you to be an invaluable asset, theyíll keep you on when they can. But donít expect a 5-10+year contract with a golden parachute should things turn sour. This isnít the Civil Service.

Lmao, that's why I quit school during my bachelors and have been in civil service IT since '04. I make a good salary and attempt to continue art on the side but there are never enuff hours. Not to mention I have passions in paint, sketch, cg, animation and photography- of which lately been between photo n sketching- guess I'm tired of computers ATM.
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  10 October 2012
Originally Posted by danmarell: I would love to do a digital reconstruction of london in a past era.

I have lots of ideas for shots involving filming in current london, tracking it and doing some interesting transitions into a past era, using methods such as old photography projection mapping.

If you ever have any plans leigh, then give me a shout.


Ooo, I'm a huge nut for historical reconstruction! Let me know if you need someone to crank out a few models! Feel free to check out my portfolio at AJ3D.us.

Sad to hear about the Dneg redundancies. I just found out about the DD situation yesterday. Been a bit of a downer on my big studio VFX dreams. Hope everyone finds more work.

And yea, Raffaele, I agree. I was just dwelling today about how this stuff has become a bit commoditized. I don't have any experience in large studios, but I've done some small studio product rendering. Maya is only like 2K now, and a good workstation could be had for under 1K. Throw that in with some Vray pre-sets and a well made CAD model, and any graphic designer or engineer with a bit of time can produce pretty nice renders.

-AJ
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Last edited by AJ1 : 10 October 2012 at 11:20 PM.
 
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