Disturbing Uses of a 3D Printer

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Old 10 October 2012   #46
Funny to see so much uproar about a printed gun, when in actuality all the work is done by the bullet.

Get a proper caliber metal pipe, carve it for vent/discharge (you can do a proper progressive radial carve for spin and stability with 50$ of kit) so it won't explode in your hands, wrap it in neoprene and stick handle wrap, put a bullet with a thin rubber wrap around it inside, and devise a hammer of sorts to hit it in the back, and you have a rifle (most likely a single use one unless the hammer is really robust).
Only problem, which guns addressed back then, is reloading, which a gun with no moving parts can't really address elegantly anyway.

Making a blunderbass or a musket is something anybody can do quite easily, and good luck tracking that.

If the only thing keeping people away from a mass spree of shooting each other was the availability of an untracked percussion device, the fact that bullets are readily available with no strict ID requirments should worry you a lot more than somebody having access to an item that can only be printed in brittle materials exploding and blinding, maiming or killing one out of three idiots that tried to use it.

I would have left the site up actually so that a few more Darwin awards would have been handed out.
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Old 10 October 2012   #47
Originally Posted by wurger: Funny, I'm frequently in the minority since I'm politically liberal, despite the fact that I've been shooting for over 40 years. Granted, there are a lot of huckleberry gun owners, but you would be hard pressed to find more ignorance and predjiuce than there is in the anti-gun community.


I don't particularly care abut your political affiliations, but I do care about you coming onto an international website and fobbing off a complex issue regarding the people of an entire continent of diverse cultures across many different countries with the condescending, belittling summation that their supposed collective attitude towards guns amounts to nothing more than a "phobia". And now, adding to that, you're taking this bizarre assumption even further by also insinuating that this entire continent of diverse cultures is "ignorant and prejudiced". Personally I'd say that making comments like that is the very definition of ignorance and prejudice. It'll obviously also come as a surprise to you that firearm ownership is actually pretty common in many European countries, it's just more stringently regulated than the US, particularly within the EU. More than half of the top 20 countries in the world for gun-ownership figures are European. A continent-wide "phobia"? I think not.

As I said in my post, you're epitomising a bad stereotype about Americans. Don't be a stereotype.
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Old 10 October 2012   #48
I'll reply to this when I'm not on my phone.
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IPA time...

Last edited by wurger : 10 October 2012 at 12:52 AM.
 
Old 10 October 2012   #49
Time to extend the no politics, no religion rule to include "no firearms". It brings the worst out in the community on so many levels and in so many ways...
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Old 10 October 2012   #50
Originally Posted by ThE_JacO: Funny to see so much uproar about a printed gun, when in actuality all the work is done by the bullet.

Get a proper caliber metal pipe, carve it for vent/discharge (you can do a proper progressive radial carve for spin and stability with 50$ of kit) so it won't explode in your hands, wrap it in neoprene and stick handle wrap, put a bullet with a thin rubber wrap around it inside, and devise a hammer of sorts to hit it in the back, and you have a rifle (most likely a single use one unless the hammer is really robust).
Only problem, which guns addressed back then, is reloading, which a gun with no moving parts can't really address elegantly anyway.

Making a blunderbass or a musket is something anybody can do quite easily, and good luck tracking that.



I'm beginning to wonder if you were the prop designer for the John Malkovich character in "In the Line of Fire".
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Old 10 October 2012   #51
Originally Posted by wurger: I'll reply to this when I'm not on my phone.


I'm not looking to derail this thread with this particular tangent of discussion. I just don't want people coming into this international community and making blanket, belittling statements about multiple cultures that they don't really appear to know anything about.

I've always maintained that stereotypes are opinions for the lazy and the ignorant, so it really irks me when I see people epitomising them, because it just gives ammo (no pun intended) to idiots.
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Old 10 October 2012   #52
Originally Posted by leigh: I'm not looking to derail this thread with this particular tangent of discussion. I just don't want people coming into this international community and making blanket, belittling statements about multiple cultures that they don't really appear to know anything about.

I've always maintained that stereotypes are opinions for the lazy and the ignorant, so it really irks me when I see people epitomising them, because it just gives ammo (no pun intended) to idiots.


For what it's worth, you are doing an excellent job of stereotyping me. Next time I'll add some goofy emoticon so it's easier to understand I'm mostly joking.

Guess there was more subliminal baggage to my post than I realized.

This new for me. I'm used to being stereotyped as an ignorant libtard, not a hopeless reactionary.
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IPA time...

Last edited by wurger : 10 October 2012 at 01:51 AM.
 
Old 10 October 2012   #53
Originally Posted by wurger: Funny, I'm frequently in the minority since I'm politically liberal, despite the fact that I've been shooting for over 40 years. Granted, there are a lot of huckleberry gun owners, but you would be hard pressed to find more ignorance and predjiuce than there is in the anti-gun community. More than a little ignorant dismissal of gun owners.


So you were "mostly joking" when you did the very stereotyping you supposedly railed against? Oooo-kaaaay.

Any-hoo, here's an article in The Economist about potential copyright pitfalls regarding 3D printing (which, seriously, will likely cause far more trouble than printing guns).

From the article:
Quote: Today’s 3D printing crowd—tucked away in garages, basements, small workshops and university labs—needs to keep a keen eye on such policy debates as they grow. “There will be a time when impacted legacy industries [will] demand some sort of DMCA for 3D printing,” says Mr Weinberg. If the tinkerers wait until that day, it will be too late.
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Last edited by Artbot : 10 October 2012 at 04:11 AM.
 
Old 10 October 2012   #54
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ated_death_rate

Nice to see US sharing company with such non-"gun phobic" countries like Mexico and Panama. I guess having a phobia of guns is a good thing when you have twice less chance to die from one?

Maybe this can be brought up during the next NRA meeting.
 
Old 10 October 2012   #55
Originally Posted by wurger: For what it's worth, you are doing an excellent job of stereotyping me.

The only one stereotyping (is that actually a word?) you is you.
In germany every small town has at least one or more gun clubs. Owning and using a gun is common and the only thing realy frowned upon is carelessness with them. It's just not part of german culture to make guns a fetish, or to see them as neccesary means for everyday survival. The latter i find deeply disturbing in a first world country.

3D printing is a hobby for me and i'm not surprised in the least that someone used it to create a weapon or a part of it. One of the first things i tried to print was a catapult and currently i'm planning to print a 1:1 size model of a 60s SF raygun. Some people just take it a step further.
As for the legal aspects, if you want to build a working, deadly gun, everyone with a lathe and a bit of knowledge can do it, 3D printing isn't a game changer here.

Cheers
Björn
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Old 10 October 2012   #56
Originally Posted by Srek: As for the legal aspects, if you want to build a working, deadly gun, everyone with a lathe and a bit of knowledge can do it, 3D printing isn't a game changer here.


I think the point is that 3d printers, in theory, may make all this things easily accessible without the need of doing research, owning tools, buying materials.
If I look at random internet comments at facebook or youtube, the degree of stupidity and aggression is staggering, I'm not looking forward to this kids 3d printing weapons at a mouseclick.
The random idiot is not going to build a working bomb or a weapon with traditional tools, because he is that, an idiot.
However, I really doubt this 3d printing stories are going to be relevant anytime soon. It's not technology like a microchip, which in the end costs next to nothing to produce. It will always be a big and complicated machine, at least for serious stuff. Maybe there will be 3d printers at gas stations or mc donalds. And little lego 3d printers for home.
Right now the only thing you can do with 3d printers are little pieces of rough plastic, it takes forever and the result is not that great IMO. It's not like we're anywhere near printing cellphones, weapons, furniture.
And if there ever is a machine that can print a cellphone, it's for sure not something to find in every household.
 
Old 10 October 2012   #57
Originally Posted by plastic: I think the point is that 3d printers, in theory, may make all this things easily accessible without the need of doing research, owning tools, buying materials.
If I look at random internet comments at facebook or youtube, the degree of stupidity and aggression is staggering, I'm not looking forward to this kids 3d printing weapons at a mouseclick.

Current 3D printing technolgies are simply not able to produce a working gun. As soon as you try to print a chamber or barrel you are in for a very nasty surprise indeed. The technologies that can do this are way out of any privately affordable range and will remain there for the forseeable future. It will take many years until 3D printed weapons will become a threat in any way and even then i think it will be much easier and cheaper to just steal one.

Cheers
Björn
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Old 10 October 2012   #58
Isn´t ammunition much more relevant? I always found it kind of bizarre how there´s so much controversy about guns, but virtually no ammunition control.
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Old 10 October 2012   #59
Originally Posted by wurger: For what it's worth, you are doing an excellent job of stereotyping me. Next time I'll add some goofy emoticon so it's easier to understand I'm mostly joking.


Wait, what? Where did I stereotype you? You waded into the thread making a blanket (and outright false) statement about an entire continent of people. In doing so, you not only disregarded the facts, but also considered Europe as a single entity as opposed to a collection of 50 different countries, each with their own culture, attitude and laws. You're epitomising a negative stereotype of Americans that gets bandied about here constantly, a stereotype of ignorant loudmouths who care nothing about making ill-informed statements about other countries. I didn't stereotype you, you stereotyped yourself. Next time you want to make statements about other cultures, find out what you're talking about first.

And I don't for one second buy your excuse now that you were joking. Because you weren't. At least have the decency to admit you were wrong instead of doing some feeble back peddling.
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Old 10 October 2012   #60
Originally Posted by plastic: However, I really doubt this 3d printing stories are going to be relevant anytime soon. It's not technology like a microchip, which in the end costs next to nothing to produce. It will always be a big and complicated machine, at least for serious stuff.


This is my perspective too. I fail to understand the fear that kids will be printing their own Nike shoes and guns. For the former, you'd need the raw materials, which would be far more hassle than simply buying a pair of shoes. You can't print leather or cloth to make shoes from. And as for guns, as a poster above me mentioned, you'd still need ammunition, and your printer can't make you gun powder.

People seem to be confused between a machine that essentially cuts shapes, and a machine that produces raw materials from nothing. A printer is the former, not the latter.
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