How the "Jaws" shark was built MOD EDIT: And How CG has taken it farther.

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Old 09 September 2012   #16
Agreed.
What I find intersthing how the art of Robotics advanced in the times since Jaws.
(BTW I Changed the title thread to avoid closure. As yo uguys who read my posts I LOVE hollywood history.)

Yes those are robots....And CG modeling tools had a lot to do with this progress.
http://www.popularmechanics.com/tec...ut-of-the-water

EDIT

Right now the GO TO guy in hollywood for robot fish is
Walt Conti.
http://waltconti.com/

Name a movie that had a aquatic fish or animal after JAWS and he did it.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0176408/


And yes to MAKE IT ON TOPIC.
His work involvesa LOT of CG, but not in the traditional way.
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Last edited by RobertoOrtiz : 09 September 2012 at 02:55 PM.
 
Old 09 September 2012   #17
Originally Posted by RobertoOrtiz: Right now the GO TO guy in hollywood for robot fish is
Walt Conti.
http://waltconti.com/


Apparently he did "Deep Blue Sea", which is a very underappreciated shark film imho.

The scene in DBS where a Shark snacks on Samuel L. Jackson is priceless.
 
Old 09 September 2012   #18
Originally Posted by DePaint: Apparently he did "Deep Blue Sea", which is a very underappreciated shark film imho.

The scene in DBS where a Shark snacks on Samuel L. Jackson is priceless.

I think that scene was dont by Hammerhead VFX.
EDIT: Fount it: http://www.hammerhead.com/dbs.html


You can take a peel at Conti's SCARY robotic Mako shark here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/telsta...in/photostream/
http://www.edgefx.com/
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Old 09 September 2012   #19
Originally Posted by Michael5188: Just out of curiosity, since I'm not a rigger and know very little about robotics, what exactly can you learn from this that can apply to CG? And I mean from the robots and mechanisms themselves, not the film-making of the time. (such as less is more)

Just keep hearing there's so much to learn from studying them, yet I haven't actually heard any specific examples, such as I was having trouble rigging an octopus, but then I saw one built for a film in the 70s and I had a eureka moment cause this was attached to this and so forth...


Precisely this.

Look, I'm not hating on the movie/shark rig. Jaws is one of my all-time favorites (just bought and watched the BR a couple weeks ago), and I own books on the making of the film. The history of motion picture vfx is fascinating and wonderful, but can we stop kidding ourselves that this has anything to do with CGI?

By the logic displayed here, any old monster rig, make-up appliance or miniature has some kind of (mysterious) significance in the modern CGI world, so they are all fair game for a new thread about that movie, too. I mean, are we just posting random stuff we like now?
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Old 09 September 2012   #20
Originally Posted by DePaint: I figured that VFX is VFX, and that the pictures would interest some people.



I don't want to sound douchy or anything, but "Visual Effects" (VFX) is Computer generated effects that are added in post and "Special Effects" is the term that's now used for stuff like this, practical effects that are shot on location. Just an FYI.

EDIT: I also don't really see what you can learn from this that transfers over to CGI, but then again I'm not a rigger. I would think it would be better to look at animals/skeletons/nature and use that as a base to rig, rather than a bad animatronic from an 80's movie.

Last edited by th3ta : 09 September 2012 at 03:43 PM.
 
Old 09 September 2012   #21
Originally Posted by th3ta: I don't want to sound douchy or anything, but "Visual Effects" (VFX) is Computer generated effects that are added in post and "Special Effects" is the term that's now used for stuff like this, practical effects that are shot on location. Just an FYI.


Point made guys.

The topic of the thread has been changed accordingly.

-R

EDIT here is some CG examples from Shark Night 3d
LINK
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Old 09 September 2012   #22
Originally Posted by Artbot: I mean, are we just posting random stuff we like now?
I know what you're saying, but it's not like it's a thread with a crotchet pattern for a life size horse.

Jaws is a classic film and Spielberg's first foray into using special effects, I personally found this fascinating and I think there's much less harm in looking back at the history of special effects work (how it relates to the practises of today...etc.) than simply pulling down a shutter that says "NOT RELEVANT".

But to each their own.

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Last edited by AJ : 09 September 2012 at 04:03 PM. Reason: spelling erororrs
 
Old 09 September 2012   #23
Originally Posted by th3ta: I don't want to sound douchy or anything, but "Visual Effects" (VFX) is Computer generated effects that are added in post and "Special Effects" is the term that's now used for stuff like this, practical effects that are shot on location. Just an FYI.


I meant to say "Special Effects" but typed VFX instead... Simple typo.

On the other hand, since film is an optical/visual medium, all film FX, whether digital or practical, kind of wind up being "Visual Effects" at the end of the day...
 
Old 09 September 2012   #24
Originally Posted by AJ: I know what you're saying, but it's not like it's a thread with a crotchet pattern for a life size horse.

That actually seems more relevant since it's basically a low-rez pixelated pattern of an image.

Originally Posted by AJ: ....I think there's much less harm in looking back at the history of special effects work...

There's certainly no harm in it and I personally find the subject fascinating. But that's not what this thread was/is about. An on-going thread about cool stuff from the history of vfx/spfx is not a bad idea at all.

Originally Posted by AJ: (how it relates to the practises of today...etc.) than simply pulling down a shutter that says "NOT RELEVANT".


I agree. Still waiting for someone to post how this relates to practices of today.
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Old 09 September 2012   #25
Originally Posted by Artbot: That actually seems more relevant since it's basically a low-rez pixelated pattern of an image.
I think that's cross-stitch.

Originally Posted by Artbot: I agree. Still waiting for someone to post how this relates to practices of today.
The mechanical shark in Jaws was nicknamed 'Bruce', Bruce is the name of the shark in Finding Nemo. Ta-da!
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Old 09 September 2012   #26
Originally Posted by Artbot: I'll give you matte paintings, but mechanical fx are not the same thing, and don't have as much crossover connection. I'm not sure how a poorly articulated mechanical shark has any influence on CGI.


Realistic mechanical limitations and how our mind can accept the reality of it- something that CG can gloss over.

Consider the robots in the Transformers films: watch door panels and other parts "shake" when a robot takes a step. Would happen in reality, despite a prop master's best efforts- but forcibly put into place by an animator for enhanced credibility and realism.
 
Old 09 September 2012   #27
If we're just showing off old monster rigs, this reel from Tremors is about as good as they get. It has actual skeletons and mechanics, miniatures of all scales, and a foreground miniature to wrap it all up.

But I still say these old clips have little to offer the modern CGI industry (at least at the level of detail shown in the original Bruce pix). Practical rigs were built cheaply and quickly and controls were typically added only for what was called for in the script. This is where it diverges greatly from CG since a rigger or modeler or designer can add ribs or bones or other controls in a much more economical way than with practical fx. Cg models can more readily be made into specialized or hero versions and don't require the overhead of more skeletons/frames being built, more skins cast, etc.
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Old 09 September 2012   #28
Originally Posted by Artbot: That actually seems more relevant since it's basically a low-rez pixelated pattern of an image.


This comment really makes me wonder why you're digging your heels in.
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Old 09 September 2012   #29
Originally Posted by NanoGator: This comment really makes me wonder why you're digging your heels in.


Was meant to be funny, but I guess it should have been a crochet pattern of a dragon, orc, or space marine to make it completely relevant.
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Old 09 September 2012   #30
Sure... but even as a joke it shows you can find a reason if you look for it. I really don't understand why you haven't done it seriously yet.

I mean, really, a piece of crap mechanical fish that failed to convince anybody it was real became such a classic that 25 years later its re-release in high-res is celebrated. Anything interesting to be gleamed from the making of it? ERmm.. well, no. Nothing at all.

I'm sorry, I just don't understand where you're coming from.
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