Resident Evil: Retribution Opens to $71.1M Worldwide

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  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by leigh: To be fair, if the female lead was unnattractive or even just of average looks, the film probably wouldn't have done as well. The fact that she's in a skin tight outfit showing off her body sells it. The posters don't sell her as a zombie fighting heroine, they sell her as a bimbo with a gun.

And before anyone says that male leads are always attractive too - they aren't. Male leads rely on wit, intelligence, courage, bravery, charm and other positive attributes for appeal. Women have to rely on their tits, arses and faces.

Sigh. Nothing changes.


Was that a crit or a reality check?
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  09 September 2012
Neither really. Just my thoughts on the matter.
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  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by fablefox:

I think the element was obvious even back then.


Come to think of it she also is in her underwear in Cutthroat Island (adjusted to the time period).
Although not for the entire movie.

Then again they used to have that in Prehistoric monster movies and the beach party genres and mixtures of the two like Horror of Party Beach
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by leigh: To be fair, if the female lead was unnattractive or even just of average looks, the film probably wouldn't have done as well. The fact that she's in a skin tight outfit showing off her body sells it. The posters don't sell her as a zombie fighting heroine, they sell her as a bimbo with a gun.

And before anyone says that male leads are always attractive too - they aren't. Male leads rely on wit, intelligence, courage, bravery, charm and other positive attributes for appeal. Women have to rely on their tits, arses and faces.

Sigh. Nothing changes.


Of courses nothing changes. Action movies are marketed to boys and men. Not girls and women.

Male characters are portrayed as such because the audience relates to the fact that they can step into the lead's shoes and be that hero somehow in a MacGyver type of way. "Wish i could do that"

Female characters cannot get a "Wish i could do that" from a male audience no matter what they do or how smart their characters are. They have to rely on things that women can "sell" to men. In an action flick, you're left with sexy outfits, limber acrobatics and explosions with sweaty women walking away.

Why do you think Michael Bay does so well. You give him a $10000 budget and he'll still be able to add two more 0's to that figure in revenue. He knows and plays the audience.

As for making an action flick with a "smart" female lead, that'll happen as soon as the majority of the action film audience is women.
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by Tamagoo: When did zombies grow worms in their mouths as extra mandibles?

Something they lifted from Resident Evil 4 the game. Instead of zombies they went with parasitic implants with an end-of-the-world cult built up around it. Pretty cool idea in the game.

What surprised me looking at the trailer was just how much they keep referring back to the games, that had to be Wesker. Last one I saw was the 2nd movie but I expect Hollywood to know best and ignore the source material.
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  09 September 2012
Wink

Originally Posted by evolucian: As for making an action flick with a "smart" female lead, that'll happen as soon as the majority of the action film audience is women.


I don't think so. Too long to write, and there are researches done into this (and some of them are secretly, since pointing out a gender to be this and that is politically incorrect), and also observation by many. But general rule is this:

Ever looked at women magazine? what posted at front? what are being pushed? what type of articles being included? They are targeted toward woman.

http://www.amazon.com/Decoding-Wome...e/dp/0312079710

http://incurablycurious.com/2012/07...tyle-magazines/

Too tired to google more, but you get the idea.

and some here:

http://vagendamag.blogspot.co.uk/20...out-tampon.html

13%? You don't make profit focusing on the 13%.

Last edited by fablefox : 09 September 2012 at 04:55 PM. Reason: more link:
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by evolucian: Of courses nothing changes. Action movies are marketed to boys and men. Not girls and women.


But that's little more than a social construct. To go deeper into this would require a discussion on the difference between sex and gender, and how society develops and caters to both (with a particular focus on gender and the social constructs of gender roles), but it's really a discussion in itself and frankly I'm feeling too lazy to go into it, as I'm relaxing on my sofa with a nice beer. Suffice to say, have you ever considered that action films appeal largely to men because society tells us that's how things should be?

Quote: Male characters are portrayed as such because the audience relates to the fact that they can step into the lead's shoes and be that hero somehow in a MacGyver type of way. "Wish i could do that"

Female characters cannot get a "Wish i could do that" from a male audience no matter what they do or how smart their characters are. They have to rely on things that women can "sell" to men. In an action flick, you're left with sexy outfits, limber acrobatics and explosions with sweaty women walking away.


Which is pretty lame, let's face it. A lot of this boils down to the pervasive cultural attitude which considers things which are "feminine" (another social construct) to be inferior. Therefore, men aren't interested in it, because they're discouraged from it. Whereas you'll find lots of females enjoy the likes of MacGyver, because there's no frowning down on aspiring to male inventiveness, adventure and intelligence. It's kinda like how nobody particularly cares if a little girl plays with toy guns or cars, but when a little boy plays with a doll - oh dear, we can't have that, now can we? This particular situation often gives rise to hysterical concern over whether the boy might be (shock! horror!) gay, and male homophobia is deeply rooted in mysogyny.

So it's not surprising that most men aren't inclined to have "I wish I could do that" moments with female characters, since most of society has indoctrinated them with the belief that anything feminine is inherently inferior, silly and not to be participated in.

Quote: As for making an action flick with a "smart" female lead, that'll happen as soon as the majority of the action film audience is women.


See my point above. It could just as easily happen if society at large stopped denigrating its own invention of "feminine" things.

Also, Ripley? She was awesome. Her popularity shows that a lot of men aren't full of shit when it comes to appreciating female leads.

And now I'm going back to my beer.
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  09 September 2012
I remember thinking Sarah Connor was a great heroine as well.
 
  09 September 2012
Wink

Originally Posted by leigh: Also, Ripley? She was awesome. Her popularity shows that a lot of men aren't full of shit when it comes to appreciating female leads.

And now I'm going back to my beer.


Interestingly, although I can't say for or represent other men, but I look at Ripley as mother figure. She is saving a child. And parental + protection is central to the movie. Ripley and the child and the queen alien protecting her kids.

And also for the fact I was a small child when I first saw Alien.

And, what I think quite important, is due to film censorship. I don't remember which film actually shows Ripley in a pant/underwear when I actually saw it on DVD, but when I was a kid, and on TV, all these things were censored out, and therefore kept Ripley in her 'motherly' image. Therefore, men, at least me, like her.

Enjoy the beer!
 
  09 September 2012
Wink

Originally Posted by JWRodegher: I remember thinking Sarah Connor was a great heroine as well.


Ah, yes, Sarah Connor. Again, she was protecting her son, so I looked at her as a mother figure too And what was the kid name? That emo hair style was cool too! (although a danger to your eye sight).
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by leigh: But that's little more than a social construct. To go deeper into this would require a discussion on the difference between sex and gender, and how society develops and caters to both (with a particular focus on gender and the social constructs of gender roles), but it's really a discussion in itself and frankly I'm feeling too lazy to go into it, as I'm relaxing on my sofa with a nice beer. Suffice to say, have you ever considered that action films appeal largely to men because society tells us that's how things should be?



Which is pretty lame, let's face it. A lot of this boils down to the pervasive cultural attitude which considers things which are "feminine" (another social construct) to be inferior. Therefore, men aren't interested in it, because they're discouraged from it. Whereas you'll find lots of females enjoy the likes of MacGyver, because there's no frowning down on aspiring to male inventiveness, adventure and intelligence. It's kinda like how nobody particularly cares if a little girl plays with toy guns or cars, but when a little boy plays with a doll - oh dear, we can't have that, now can we? This particular situation often gives rise to hysterical concern over whether the boy might be (shock! horror!) gay, and male homophobia is deeply rooted in mysogyny.

So it's not surprising that most men aren't inclined to have "I wish I could do that" moments with female characters, since most of society has indoctrinated them with the belief that anything feminine is inherently inferior, silly and not to be participated in.



See my point above. It could just as easily happen if society at large stopped denigrating its own invention of "feminine" things.

Also, Ripley? She was awesome. Her popularity shows that a lot of men aren't full of shit when it comes to appreciating female leads.

And now I'm going back to my beer.

yea society as a whole is pretty much as you described, but until there's massive change at a subconscious level in terms of consumers, we'll pretty much be stuck to going by whatever next trend pops up in the media and is "cool" for guys or "chic" for women. Whether it be objects or behavior.
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by JWRodegher: I remember thinking Sarah Connor was a great heroine as well.


Not me.
In the 1st film she was a survivor who was also likable.
In the second film she was psychotic and neither attractive nor someone you could sympathize with.
 
  09 September 2012
In the first one it was interesting to see her transform from the damsel in distress to a fighter.
In the second she's exactly what I would expect a woman in such situation to be. I'd be psycothic as well if there's an invincible robot from future trying to kill my son, and no one believes me and even send me to a psychiatric institution (where the guards abuse you for fun).

Under all that thick layer of crazy, there's a strong and pretty smart person, who is also emotionally unstable due to the unthinkable situation she has to face. But she's relentless, and will no stop for anything in the world. Is she a role model? Probably not, but then again, I enjoy movies where the heroes are less than perfect and very much human.
 
  09 September 2012
I think she was supposed to be more of a terminator than the arnuld one and only mellows out after reuniting with her son and taking some cues from the terminator/father (which they made clear in the voice overs).


Another thing with Alien, Resident Evil and the Terminator is that they are classifiable as monster movies which have always been popular and allow for a wide range of characters dealing with them--not just a standard hero. If its a crime drama or terrorist attack plot its usually a more rigid set of character types.
(cop, military person etc).
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by JWRodegher: In the first one it was interesting to see her transform from the damsel in distress to a fighter.
In the second she's exactly what I would expect a woman in such situation to be. I'd be psycothic as well if there's an invincible robot from future trying to kill my son, and no one believes me and even send me to a psychiatric institution (where the guards abuse you for fun).


I guess, to be fair, there were (2) Sara Conners: the films and the show.

In the films she was indeed psychotic... but the show shows a Sara that regained her humanity. The Sara of the show was more of a heroin in my book.
 
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