Getting a Degree due to Visa requirements

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Old 09 September 2012   #1
Getting a Degree due to Visa requirements

I get that this might be an utterly stupid question, but here goes.

Getting a Masters degree seems quite essential to getting a visa wherever you might go.
So, if someone has got sufficient practical experience in a field, is it possible to just "pick one up", so to speak?

And what degree would fit that of what we do for a living?

Again, feel free to slap the back of my head with obviousness.

Thanks
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Old 09 September 2012   #2
How about this, have any of you ever had use of your degree's? Or have ever been limited by not having one? I'm guessing most people don't have a degree, simply because there aren't that many educations directly relevant to cg plus that the portfolio does most of the talking anyway.
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Old 09 September 2012   #3
Any specific country? Dont think masters is much of an advantage over bachelor for most of them.
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Old 09 September 2012   #4
It's been said many times here before: Degrees don't really matter if you stay in the country you went to school in/live in. If you want to work in another country, then it's possible it could matter, depending on what that country's work visa policies are.

Try doing a search here on "degree" and you'll see a lot of similar discussions.
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Old 09 September 2012   #5
Originally Posted by katisss: Any specific country? Dont think masters is much of an advantage over bachelor for most of them.


This is true. If you want to work in the States, then a bachelor degree is sufficient to cover the educational requirement (which can be waived if you have 12 years of experience in your field). Different countries have different visa requirements, so if there's a particular country you're interested in, then it's best to look on their immigration website, as opposed to asking here.
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Old 09 September 2012   #6
I recently moved from the UK to the US and had this problem - despite 7 years in the industry, I had no degree so they didnt want to know.
Thankfully the company I applied for had recently opened a uk office which I went to work at, where after 12 months I (/they) were able to apply for a sponsored L1 visa. After about 6 months processing it came in.
This is valid for 5ish years, but I need to go back to the uk every 2 years to renew it in the embassy and it's only valid for as long as I work for this company - it cant be transferred, and if I were to decide to work for anyone else i'd have to go back to the UK and start the whole process again.
After 5 years it switches to another one which gives a lot more freedom (albiet still some way off a greencard), although i'm not sure how long I need to go back to the Uk for when that comes around - my impression is that it's fairly streamlined so long as i'm doing everything by the book.

I had a HND in civil engineering and distinctions coming out of my ears but it didnt make a difference.

Last edited by cubiclegangster : 09 September 2012 at 10:20 PM.
 
Old 09 September 2012   #7
I have a Masters in Digital Special Effects and it has come in kinda handy

On the visa front it can make it easier for companies to get you the visa as a Masters often allows you to apply for a different bracket of visa as a Post Grad.

But the most important thing is actual work experience for getting most visa's
 
Old 09 September 2012   #8
Originally Posted by marcuso: How about this, have any of you ever had use of your degree's? Or have ever been limited by not having one? I'm guessing most people don't have a degree, simply because there aren't that many educations directly relevant to cg plus that the portfolio does most of the talking anyway.

If it's a VISA question, re: any country with point based evaluations (Canada), or harder to get into ones that use non-scored individual evaluations for special talents (IE: O-1 in the States). Yes, a degree that's recognized in that country to some or its full extent is -always- worth something. Some times a lot.

IE: for non special talent visas in the States you used to have to prove three years of on the field experience for every one of four accredited years of uni you wouldn't have, and you could only offset less than two of those through special merit/recognition before you'd have to change that to an O-1.

If you're not well seasoned (and they do require you prove the track record), then degrees help. But don't think that if you're going for a software engineer position in SanFran they will take a masters in fitness training seriously

For everything else not visa related, the "degree's worth" question is a dead horse that can't take another beating.
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Old 09 September 2012   #9
Originally Posted by taffy77: But the most important thing is actual work experience for getting most visa's

That depends from the countries actually.
For some visa's in the States specific doctorates combined with a year of lab and even just one or two of employment are practically a guarantee you will get a visa when compared with work experience, even a double digit number.

Last I looked into it for myself, my (at the time) thirteen years of experience with eleven of those on continuous and flawless record were a harder sell than a single uni degree combined with two years on the floor.

O-1 the clout and lawyers of the company make a lot more difference than anything else apparently, especially when you see one specific studio getting people with hardly any higher education a visa within three months, and others struggling or turning staff down after a stretch of six.
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Old 09 September 2012   #10
Well, I would speak from my own case. I have been working for a canadian company for like 6 years remotely from Mexico, and this company wants me to move to Canada and they offered a nice salary and so on, also there is an agreement to get easily to Canada from Mexico, but when I was at university I sent them to hell because I was teaching 3d at the university when I was on the second semester and it never made any sense, so I left college and now after so many years and the chance to get to Canada to work I don't have a degree and without that all the doors are closed.. so.. not good at all haha

So, I really recommed to get a degree on something related to what you want to work at overseas, and if time is a big problem you can always try some online courses, there are some good options everywhere and since you only need the paper to show it any school would do.

Most important than school is the portfolio, but if you can study and produce a great one in a single shot it would be really good for you.

Good luck!!

B-
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Old 09 September 2012   #11
Originally Posted by ThE_JacO: That depends from the countries actually.
For some visa's in the States specific doctorates combined with a year of lab and even just one or two of employment are practically a guarantee you will get a visa when compared with work experience, even a double digit number.

Last I looked into it for myself, my (at the time) thirteen years of experience with eleven of those on continuous and flawless record were a harder sell than a single uni degree combined with two years on the floor.

O-1 the clout and lawyers of the company make a lot more difference than anything else apparently, especially when you see one specific studio getting people with hardly any higher education a visa within three months, and others struggling or turning staff down after a stretch of six.


I was just quoting my immigration laywer. Although the USA is a whole different ball game.
 
Old 09 September 2012   #12
Fair enough.

Canada still has a more streamlined, and incidentally easier to "game" in a good way, system in those regards.
You can score points per year of employment really easily, and even if they decide to take a special interest in your case it's nowhere as hard to prove experience as it can be for a USA H-1.

I wrote plenty references and even got a handful of calls from the States when people who were in my teams were moving over, and not everybody got one in time or at all in the end.
I have yet to provide anything more than a linked-in endorsment for those who applied for Canadian ones, or hear of somebody not getting a visa if they had a sponsor and a modicum of experience.
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Old 09 September 2012   #13
Originally Posted by katisss: Dont think masters is much of an advantage over bachelor for most of them.


Just using the quote here as a lead in. Assuming the OP is in the UK, having industry experience may allow them to get into an appropriate masters without an undergraduate degree. As I think masters are often just 1 year in the UK (the non-CG one I did was), that's less time and money to gain the needed qualification (and often less competition to get into).
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Last edited by Ordibble-Plop : 09 September 2012 at 01:25 AM.
 
Old 09 September 2012   #14
Having a degree is good enough for most visa applications. I will say though if your from the UK getting a US visa even with a degree is no easy task.

b
 
Old 09 September 2012   #15
Originally Posted by mr Bob: Having a degree is good enough for most visa applications. I will say though if your from the UK getting a US visa even with a degree is no easy task.

b

Do I sense some personal experience bubbling up there?
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